55

In terms of bulk price wood is about 3x cheaper than plastic. (I buy both plastic and wood materials for commercial and residential uses in my profession.) Also, wood is biodegradable which makes it safer for the environment if children toss away the stick after they eat the ice cream.


47

Besides the other things mentioned, wood is an insulator and is a poor thermal sink. To explain -- have you ever tried to hold onto something plastic that's been in your freezer? It can be quite uncomfortable. (as can walking barefoot on one of those new plastic decks when it's been out in the sun). Wood, however, so long as it wasn't soaked, can be held ...


39

One element is tradition. The popsicle was supposedly invented by Frank Epperson when he left a drink mixture on the porch overnight in with a wooden stirrer in it. (Some historians have questioned this narrative, however, given that Epperson claimed this occurred in 1905 in San Francisco, but weather records show that it never got cold enough in the 1905 ...


21

There are two main base recipes for ice cream. French style ice cream contains egg yolks, which help make it soft, rich, smooth, creamy, custardy. Philadelphia style ice cream (sometimes called American style) has no eggs, and relies on the fat in the cream to keep it soft, but will still never be as rich and smooth as French style, and will still tend to ...


18

It's perfectly safe to do this, it's not great for the ice cream's consistency to keep warming it and cooling it as you'll start to get big ice crystals. I'd suggest you get a metal ice cream scoop and put it in hot water instead. If you have to thaw it to use it I'd leave it on the counter for 10 minutes instead of nuking it so you get an even thaw, using ...


17

Ice cream is an emulsion and in it, you have air, fat, and ice. The smaller the ice crystals, the smoother the icecream and better chance of achieving a velvety, creamy, smooth texture. The flavor is also elevated given the smaller crystals. Put it in the freezer, and ice crystals start to grow bigger and you lose the benefits. Also, colder temperature ...


17

I've accidentally run my scoop, a Zeroll with conductive fluid inside the handle, through the dishwasher. I don't know this for a fact because I didn't cut mine open to check, but I believe what happened to mine (and what's happened to yours) is that the fluid is meant to work at normal body temperature and when it gets too hot, like in a dishwasher, it ...


17

I think the ice cream sticks better to wood than plastic


15

Is the liquid inside the handle? Some ice-cream-scoops are hollow and have a liquid on the inside to help heat conduction - this helps melt the ice-cream and prevent it from freezing to the scoop. Here's an example: http://www.amazon.com/Zeroll-1020-Original-Cream-Scoop/dp/B0002U34EW/ref=sr_1_11?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1407359424&sr=1-11 Note ...


15

You just need the ice cream to be soft enough to mold. Your recipe is referring to store-bought ice cream that tends to be very hard. A little time on the counter will soften it a bit without melting it completely. A microwave is right out. It would melt pockets completely which would solidify to icy chunks. If you are making the ice cream yourself then ...


13

One reason could be that dishwasher detergent significantly affects aluminum items. I learned early on that aluminum pans lost their shine and had a dark residue on the surface. Not 100% sure, but it seems like oxidation. With a good cleaning the shine can be restored. However, I no longer put any aluminum items in the dishwasher and no longer deal with this ...


13

Milk and cream are essentially made up of water, fat, and protein molecules. Within milk and cream, the fat globules are already emulsified in the surrounding water by casein (one of the proteins found in milk and cream). This means that casein molecules surround each fat globule and prevent them from coming together. This is why milk doesn't separate into ...


11

If you make homemade strawberry ice cream, the color is likely to be very, very pale, approaching white. Green food coloring in your mix should do the trick. It would be very difficult to retroactively turn commercial ice cream a different color. The pink is almost certainly from food coloring, and mixing in another coloring would be very difficult ...


11

Ice cream is an emulsion of air, water, and fat. As Jefromi points out you can make gelato or Philadelphia style without egg yolks. Besides the taste and texture, egg yolk protein helps firm up the ice cream emulsion as an emulsifying agent (same way gelatin helps set Jello). Not only you don't need the Egg Yolks to make ice cream, you don't even need the ...


10

The general things that can cause icy sorbet: Too much water Compared to other ingredients. Since you probably aren't going to take water out of your fruit, you pretty much have to add sugar or alcohol to compensate for this. This is tricky if you're improvising, and if the water content of the fruit varies. Bad churning/freezing: This is mostly determined ...


10

I read that as 2 cups of Greek yogurt made from whole milk (ie not low- or non-fat yogurt). The comma does make it confusing, however.


9

Evidently, there are some recipes for frozen confections based on oat milk. For example, Dia Designs provides "5 vegan ice creams", most of which are based on oat milk. They read more like sorbet recipes, due to the lack of fat in the mix. If you were to try to create your own oat milk based frozen dessert recipes, I would suggest modifying a base sorbet ...


9

As someone who uses liquid nitrogen as part of their daily routine (in a lab) and who has made liquid nitrogen ice cream on several occasions, my advice would be to not use a plastic container to hold liquid nitrogen unless it's designed to. Yes, the plastic vessel may become brittle and may fracture. I have seen some materials shatter with extreme ...


9

Ice cream depends critically on the fat in the dairy to form the structure and mouth feel. Ice cream mixes there fore are typically fairly high in dairy fat. You have substituted a comparatively low fat mock cream. which simply does not have the fat necessary to create the body of the ice cream. In fact, the so-called homemade cream recipe is just ...


9

Sugar does more than just make ice cream sweet. It also controls the way ice cream freezes. Without it, you tend to get bigger ice crystals, which have an unpleasant mouth feel. There are substitutes. Breyer's sugar-free ice cream, for example, has guar gum, polydextrose, cellulose gum and gel, and maltodextrin, among other things. Home ice cream makers don'...


9

When carbonated root beer comes into contact with the ice cream, carbon dioxide bubbles are released. Likewise, the soda helps to free air bubbles trapped in the ice cream. The fat in the ice cream coats all these bubbles, protecting them and allowing them to expand to create the huge heads of foam you see on root beer floats. https://wonderopolis.org/...


9

It's called "sweet cream" ice cream. If you make your own ice cream with something like milk, cream, eggs, and sugar, and you don't put any additional flavoring in it, it's called a "sweet cream base".


8

When I've done this in the past, I did two things differently. I used more of a fudge sauce that would thicken and get somewhat firmer when cold. Like a fudge sauce or such. Syrup just mixes too easy. Mixing a swirl into a deeper container like the churning tub proved somewhat diffcult. As I tried to swirl, it would mix instead. Instead, I spread the ...


8

My dad used to buy icecream after a long day work for us (it was a 3 hour drive.) He used styrofoam boxes with some dry ice. Not sure if it can hold up till 12 hours.


8

I don't have any direct experience to share, but it seems a little logic may be applicable. I suggest that your hot fudge is too hot and your ice cream is not icy (cold) enough. Rather than microwaving the fudge, try a hot water bath on the stove. Yeah, it's slower, but you also won't burn the bejeezus out of the sugar at the edges. Taste occasionally while ...


8

Eat it faster. Seriously. I am a huge fan of homemade hot fudge and much of the appeal is the contrast between the cold and the hot. Freezing your ice cream more solid will help but insufficiently heating the chocolate won't. If the fudge gets too cool it sets up into one solid chewy chunk. Perhaps your best solution would be to serve smaller portions ...


8

In a literal sense, rumtscho and SAJ14SAJ are right. However, if you're willing to be a little adventurous, then you can do this! and without an ice cream machine. And it'll be a fun party trick, to boot. First, buy strawberry ice cream with real strawberries that isn't fully pink (like Haagen Dazs). Second, use pistachio colouring/paste, it's full ...


8

There are a variety of frozen desserts which are all related. The main difference between ice cream and frozen custard is the amount of eggs used to thicken the base mix. Philadelphia style ice cream is made from a base mix of milk and/or cream, sugar, and flavorings. French (or simply plain) ice cream is made from a base mix which is essentially a very ...


8

It's a flavor. It's on the subtle side, particularly in the quantities it's often used in, and maybe if you've eaten a ton of vanilla ice cream you don't notice it anymore. (Or maybe you just haven't had very good vanilla ice cream.) The flavor is either from the vanilla bean if it's fancy vanilla ice cream, or more likely from artificially produced ...


8

FOUND IT! From The Sweet Home The Zeroll isn’t dishwasher safe. Often you’ll see that fact associated with the heat conducting core of the scoop, but that’s not really the culprit. The folks at Zeroll were able to explain a bit to me about how the core of the scoop works, and why it isn’t dishwasher safe. According to Zeroll, the fluid is a “non-...


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