Hot answers tagged

28

If you're just practicing piping, you can just pipe onto parchment paper (or a clean counter) and then scrape it off with a spatula and save the frosting. That way you can actually practice with the frosting you'll be using and not be thrown off by different textures and consistencies. ETA: This is what we've actually done in a few bakeries where I've ...


24

It's fine as written. Combining vinegar with baking soda (or any acid with any base) is usually done in baking to produce gas, which can lighten the finished product. This is an icing, which is applied after the baking process; it's not set to capture air bubbles, so any effect would be largely temporary and more easily produced through beating. The ...


15

Professionals ice on a turntable. Turntables for home use are affordable, and make icing much easier. Your spatula should reach to about the centre of the cake when held steady and comfortable. As @rfusca suggests, heating it for buttercream is a good idea. You can also wet it for other icings, to make it glide smoothly. For the icing process itself, ...


10

Option 1: Canned frosting is a lot cheaper than making your own. It doesn't taste as good, but that doesn't really matter if you just use it to practice. Option 2: Make a batch of very simple buttercream frosting to practice with. After each practice session, scrape it off, and freeze. Defrost it before every use (it may need to be whipped for a couple of ...


9

No personal experience but: Cake making site recommends making your buttercream with crisco instead of butter. It's cheaper but it's not going to taste good at all. It can also be reused and stored repeatedly. A recipe - Source: Cake Central Forums: 1 cup vegetable shortening 2 to 4 Tbsp water 1 lb confectioner's sugar 1 Tbsp meringue powder Beat for ...


8

There actually are a few tricks that haven't been mentioned, other than years of practice: First, you need to start off with a crumb-free cake. That is, you don't want any loose crumbs from poking through the icing, ruining the coat. After stacking, I first brush it off with a pastry brush, then I apply a 'crumb coat', a thin layer of icing that's let to ...


8

Fondant is nearly solid -- it's rolled out, and placed onto the cake (with a buttercream underneath as an adhesive). The advantage is that it goes on really quickly and smoothly over large items. It can also be cut into shapes with rather clean edges (modeling chocolate gives sharper edges, but it's not flexible enough to cover a round cake). You often ...


8

When heating sugar up in boiled icing or in making candy, the problem is sugar crystallization. This happens because the solution becomes supersaturated and any movement can cause it to shift back into a crystal state. The corn syrup is there to prevent this from happening by providing glucose to 'get in the way'. You can get just 'glucose' at the ...


7

Well you're kinda right about it lasting a long time due to the sugar content. That will help the preserving process to the extreme. However, to be pratical you should be looking at how long the butter fat will survive in the fridge before it starts to take on funky flavours and loses it's moisture. You'll be fine in an air tight tub for a month or so but ...


7

If you cannot find these ingredients, it will be hard to get this type of icing made. The first thing is the liquid glucose. If you used any old thing labelled "syrup", chances are that it contained water, and this is what made your mix a sugar. Liquid glucose is mostly sugar, with almost no wetness to it. Substituting something very wet will not work. ...


6

If you're talking about buttercream or such icing - warm your spatula just a bit so that the icing melts just slightly as icing spatula hits it. I keep a bowl of hot water for this purpose beside the cake while icing.


6

When I've seen them used, they first frosted the cake, smoothed it out, then placeed the rice paper on top. My understanding is that the moisture in the frosting can end up melting the rice paper, so that it basically disappears into the frosting, with the ink effectively transfering into the frosting. As I've never done it myself, I have no idea if there ...


6

There is no absolute conversion as egg sizes were not standardized back then. For the USA, not England, the food timeline http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodeggs.html under the section "Egg sizes the USA" (about 1/10th of the way down) starts with (bolding added): What size hen's egg was used to make a cake in the 1840s? Excellent question with no simple ...


5

I usually add vegetable shortening to my frosting recipe so that it doesn't melt easily. I live in India and it's hot in here for crying out loud. Another helpful tip is to add 2 tsp Meringue powder to your each icing batch, that tends to avoid the weepy icing. Hope this helps. (Source: Years of commercial bakery experience and my fair lot of sad weepy ...


5

There are three considerations when it comes to icing: look, texture and taste. Royal icing is stiff and mostly used for decorations. Fondant looks smooth - think of how a wedding cake looks. It's also slightly stiff and chewy in comparison to buttercream or ganache icing. You would roll this out with a rolling pin and place it on the cake instead of ...


5

Many frostings incorporate more than butter as the fat in the icing. I recently made ones using shortening, coconut butter, and coconut milk solids. These three are all fats that have higher melting points and are more reliable at higher temperatures in comparison to butter. If you wish to retain as much of the butter mouthfeel as possible, you might ...


5

The reason this frosting uses unsweetened chocolate is because with all the sugar and sweetened chocolate (even dark, ie 70%) it would become cloyingly sweet. It needs to have double the amount of icing sugar to butter as this produces a smooth texture. If you don't have enough icing sugar it won't have a smooth texture and will have a hard texture almost ...


5

Meringue is a protein-based foam. The proteins form a semi-stable mesh with air bubbles trapped inside. The reason they are semi-stable is that they unravel a bit and hook into each other, Velcro-style. When you introduce fat, it lubricates and smooths the unraveled proteins, so they lose their hooking ability. If the fat is introduced before the eggwhites ...


5

Liquid glucose can be replaced with plain corn syrup, in most cases. The icing sugar is almost the same as powdered sugar, if you have access to that. If you can't find powdered sugar either, you'll need to put granulated sugar into a food processor with about 2 tablespoons of cornstarch per cup of sugar and blend it until it's a fine powder. The cornstarch ...


5

If you are talking about the sculptural elements, the icing used to create those is called fondant. The name fondant comes from the french for melting. It has a consistency somewhere between play dough and tootsie rolls. Here is a good tutorial on making fondant. It can also be purchased. You can find millions of tutorials on how to work with fondant. ...


5

Pretty much any solid fat will work here. Since you're replacing something that's not just fat, you might prefer to whip the fat to lighten it up a bit, no matter which you choose. Since your recipe already has coconut milk, coconut oil seems like a really obvious choice - it's common in recipes like this, especially vegan/paleo ones that want to avoid ...


5

Yes you can. If you have unsweetened condensed milk, that is another name for evaporated milk and they are interchangeable. If you have sweetened condensed milk, you can use one 14 oz can to replace one cup of evaporated milk and one cup of granulated sugar.


4

I would halve the amount of icing sugar and substitute in cocoa powder. As long as you sift the cocoa powder well you should still have a smooth icing at the end. Provided your chocolate isn't milk chocolate you should still have a 'proper' chocolate flavour as well.


4

Mille feuille (Napoleon), eclairs and petit fours, to name but a few, are definitely iced with fondant pastry - also known as poured fondant. Not a royal icing. There are 3 types of fondant: Pastry Fondant - known as poured fondant Confectioners Fondant - can be interchangeable as poured fondant. Rolled Fondant Both poured and confectioners are ...


4

The dessert discribed is not truley a "Tom Pouce", that is a different pastry. What is discribed in the question is a "Napoleon" dessert pastry. The Mille Feuille or Puff Pastry is topped with an icing called "Fondant". Fondant in it's simplest (shortcut) form is made by mixed powdered sugar and water until the desired thickness is reached. Some time in ...


4

Are you sure you want to use icing? The barbie cakes I have seen all have the skirt made from rolled marzipan, not from icing. The bodice can be a normal fabric top or dress (inedible, can be washed after the cake is eaten) or also molded from marzipan. I agree that it isn't as tasty as buttercream icing, but it surely makes a more beautiful skirt. This ...


4

It's most likely (in my opinion) that the air (and subsequently air bubbles) is being introduced into your fondant at the kneading process rather than anything to do with your rolling method or surface used to roll on. Perhaps experiment a little on a more gentle but firm (as opposed to vigorous) kneading method and see if that removes those air bubbles in ...


4

The crusting is important so that any flowers or other intricate decorations will fix their shape and not slump when left out in warmer temperatures. (you don't want to refrigerate iced cakes, as when you remove them from the fridge, you'll get condensation). An icing that crusts quickly means that you can use an icing that's not quite as stiff for your ...


4

If you use the buttercream option, let the icing dry a bit before putting the rice paper on, as too much moisture will cause it to collapse and the ink to run. Also, I wouldn't recommend pressing the rice paper down, but just patting it onto slightly tacky buttercream. White icing is best as the rice paper is quite translucent. The other alternative you ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible