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28

If you're just practicing piping, you can just pipe onto parchment paper (or a clean counter) and then scrape it off with a spatula and save the frosting. That way you can actually practice with the frosting you'll be using and not be thrown off by different textures and consistencies. ETA: This is what we've actually done in a few bakeries where I've ...


24

It's fine as written. Combining vinegar with baking soda (or any acid with any base) is usually done in baking to produce gas, which can lighten the finished product. This is an icing, which is applied after the baking process; it's not set to capture air bubbles, so any effect would be largely temporary and more easily produced through beating. The ...


10

Option 1: Canned frosting is a lot cheaper than making your own. It doesn't taste as good, but that doesn't really matter if you just use it to practice. Option 2: Make a batch of very simple buttercream frosting to practice with. After each practice session, scrape it off, and freeze. Defrost it before every use (it may need to be whipped for a couple of ...


9

No personal experience but: Cake making site recommends making your buttercream with crisco instead of butter. It's cheaper but it's not going to taste good at all. It can also be reused and stored repeatedly. A recipe - Source: Cake Central Forums: 1 cup vegetable shortening 2 to 4 Tbsp water 1 lb confectioner's sugar 1 Tbsp meringue powder Beat for ...


7

If you cannot find these ingredients, it will be hard to get this type of icing made. The first thing is the liquid glucose. If you used any old thing labelled "syrup", chances are that it contained water, and this is what made your mix a sugar. Liquid glucose is mostly sugar, with almost no wetness to it. Substituting something very wet will not work. ...


6

There is no absolute conversion as egg sizes were not standardized back then. For the USA, not England, the food timeline http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodeggs.html under the section "Egg sizes the USA" (about 1/10th of the way down) starts with (bolding added): What size hen's egg was used to make a cake in the 1840s? Excellent question with no simple ...


6

I can't be sure, but it looks like there are two different things going on here. For the ice cream cake, notice that there is no white chocolate in the bottom swirl (the white there is a reflection of the light). So I expect they are using an implement (quite possibly the tip of a spoon) and swirling it from the dark side to the light side. Then they lift ...


5

If you are talking about the sculptural elements, the icing used to create those is called fondant. The name fondant comes from the french for melting. It has a consistency somewhere between play dough and tootsie rolls. Here is a good tutorial on making fondant. It can also be purchased. You can find millions of tutorials on how to work with fondant. ...


5

Liquid glucose can be replaced with plain corn syrup, in most cases. The icing sugar is almost the same as powdered sugar, if you have access to that. If you can't find powdered sugar either, you'll need to put granulated sugar into a food processor with about 2 tablespoons of cornstarch per cup of sugar and blend it until it's a fine powder. The cornstarch ...


5

I usually add vegetable shortening to my frosting recipe so that it doesn't melt easily. I live in India and it's hot in here for crying out loud. Another helpful tip is to add 2 tsp Meringue powder to your each icing batch, that tends to avoid the weepy icing. Hope this helps. (Source: Years of commercial bakery experience and my fair lot of sad weepy ...


5

Pretty much any solid fat will work here. Since you're replacing something that's not just fat, you might prefer to whip the fat to lighten it up a bit, no matter which you choose. Since your recipe already has coconut milk, coconut oil seems like a really obvious choice - it's common in recipes like this, especially vegan/paleo ones that want to avoid ...


5

Yes you can. If you have unsweetened condensed milk, that is another name for evaporated milk and they are interchangeable. If you have sweetened condensed milk, you can use one 14 oz can to replace one cup of evaporated milk and one cup of granulated sugar.


4

Mille feuille (Napoleon), eclairs and petit fours, to name but a few, are definitely iced with fondant pastry - also known as poured fondant. Not a royal icing. There are 3 types of fondant: Pastry Fondant - known as poured fondant Confectioners Fondant - can be interchangeable as poured fondant. Rolled Fondant Both poured and confectioners are ...


4

The dessert discribed is not truley a "Tom Pouce", that is a different pastry. What is discribed in the question is a "Napoleon" dessert pastry. The Mille Feuille or Puff Pastry is topped with an icing called "Fondant". Fondant in it's simplest (shortcut) form is made by mixed powdered sugar and water until the desired thickness is reached. Some time in ...


4

I practiced originally with pure shortening back when I was learning how to pipe. Just scrape it back into the shortening container, as long as you use a spotless surface. Its also excellent for practicing making roses ans other flowers. If you want to practice really intricate bead or lacework - which you would do with royal icing - then unfortunately you ...


4

You could try adding a piping gel, such as the one found here, which contains no eggs or dairy. Alternatively, the colder you keep the whipped cream icing, the better it will hold its shape. You could refrigerate the icing until immediately prior to serving which would help.


4

If you can get a powdered substitute, or even pasteurized egg whites, and it will make you feel better, go for it. I understand that using meringue powder is actually a bit easier to work with, so if it's convenient to you, and if it provides some peace of mind, don't hesitate. It won't compromise your final product at all. I think there are official ...


3

You'll definitely want to freeze the cake. Once it's frozen, use a spatula to apply a layer of ganache to the side that will be the bottom of the cake, then return it to the freezer. Once that has set, put the cake, ganache/bottom down on a cooling rack on top of a sheet of parchment paper or acetate. Slowly pour your melted ganache over the cake, guiding it ...


3

You could use vegetable shortening or stick margarine as a substitute for the butter. Either would be much more economical for practice purposes.


3

Butter cream consists mostly of almost water-free fat (butter or shortening) and sugar. Whipped cream has about 30% fat, the remaining part is solids and mostly water. Everything that has significant amount of water will dissolve fondant since fondant consists of sugar. For example, cream, yoghurt, cream cheese, mascarpone and pudding (custard) are out. ...


3

It is true that you can use the cottage cheese, you could even use ricotta cheese which Italians have a Ricotta Cheese Pie and Sambucca Liqueur is used as a flavoring. It is delicious. Using cottage cheese, which I have, really does not taste good, not only in my opinion but others who have tried to cut calories. Either use less cream cheese with less ...


3

Vinegar also changes the consistency of a substrate. For example, it makes toffee malleable, or can be used in a pastry to make it stretchy. It potentially affects the texture of the icing too.


3

The main pitfall to whipped cream is that it has to be kept cold. Your hands will heat up the cream in the bag, causing it to lose volume and pipe sloppily. Stabilizing the whipped cream will help. See (Adjusting whipped cream to hold its shape longer?) But mostly, you need to keep it cool: Frequent rests, putting the bag in the fridge Refill frequently ...


3

I saw no degradation in image quality (custom printed ones) in a few days. If the icing is hard then you moisten it just enough for the rice paper to stick before letting it dry again you should be fine as there's no source of moisture to make the ink suffer. But of course check the instructions - I think mine used alcohol-based inks. But why not ice the ...


3

It depends on the type of recipe you want to use, but generally the answer is yes. Powdered/confectioner's sugar recipes for glaze or icing often just use a very small amount of liquid. With granulated sugar, it can be difficult to get a smooth consistency by just adding the liquid that way, so the more standard way with regular sugar is to add a small ...


3

The icing will seem like it's melting and soak though the pound cake. The effect will be similar to soaking the cake with simple syrup. A pound cake is fairly 'solid' so the consistency shouldn't be affected very much, unless you use enormous amounts of icing.


3

This is a pretty tricky question to answer without knowing what the climate is like in your area. Meringue is hygroscopic (absorbs water easily) due to the high concentration of sugars in the mixture. This means that any available source of water, including the air and the cake underneath, will donate water to the mix and make it soft fairly quickly and ...


2

Top tier professional bakers do a few things, some mentioned here but some not. Here is the run down: Most top tier bakers are using Italian buttercream. It's more stable than American buttercream and IMHO tastes way better. Otherwise use American buttercream. Make sure the buttercream is just soft enough to spread but if it's too goopy or spongy you'll ...


2

A cake teacher taught me this method and it works beautifully. Trace your image onto the rice paper (bumpy side up) with edible ink. Cut the image out with about an 1/4 inch border left on. Place picture on cake. Use a toothpick to outline the image. Remove image and spread piping gel (get at Michaels, Hobby Lobby etc.) inside the traced toothpick lines. ...


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