8

Firstly, it has to be said - the way you learn to judge quantities is … practise. However, there are several factors at play here… "Indians" [sorry, I'm generalising a whole continent into one word for convenience] don't eat mouth-stingingly-hot food at every meal. Some food is mild, some is 'go-for-it'. Some is rich, some is bland, some has heat, ...


5

There's a few factors that may be at work here: Quality of spices: how good your spices are to begin with, as in how much flavor they impart to food is an important factor in the result. Better quality means more flavor. Where you are in the world and where you shop can make a difference Freshness of spices: If you have spices that have been sitting for ...


2

Most of the dals I know are made by boiling the lentils (with or without vegetables, tomatoes, salt, green chillies, turmeric, even whole peppercorns) and then frying spices and/or aromatics separately and adding them to the dal. There are some exceptions, but in any case you can always get away with frying an extra pinch of chilli flakes/powder in oil and ...


1

Yes those three are very different. Paneer butter masala is paneer in tomato sauce, kofta is fried paneer balls and nabratan korma is made with vegetables.


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