13

Induction cooking works by inducing a field in the metal of the cooking container so that the resultant currents cause energy dissipation. For metal in the order of say 3 to 10 mm thick, at low enough frequencies the induced fields occur throughout the metal. As the frequency is increased the heating zone occupies an area increasingly near the exterior of ...


8

Induction cooking works by generating an electric current in the metal cooking vessel and converting that current into heat, which requires a resistive material (i.e. a poor conductor). It's a bit of a catch-22, because you need a good conductor to actually distribute that heat. This is why some of the best induction cookware is clad metal - two layers of (...


8

Cracking? No, not in my experience. I own like 20 cast iron skillets (I've been told I have a problem). Warping? Yes. I have a 2,800 watt per burner commercial induction stove with a very small pattern like yours. If you repeatedly overheat a pan on high for searing, it will eventually bow outwards. Warping can be mitigated by preheating your pan gently. ...


7

Yes, it will work. The induction interface disks are practically the same thing as a griddle. Of course, both disks and griddles mean that the induction stove will behave like a resistive stove (slow heating, etc.) If you want to get your money's worth from the induction stove, replace your cookware. The combination with cast iron is great, as it gives you ...


7

I don't know if it will work with your induction cooker, but I have used a very old and worn out sheet of silpat, silicon baking sheet. I have an older induction cooker and used the silpat to protect the cooking surface from scratches and from the food/oil splatter that happens so often when I cook. I have not had a problem as long as the pan you are using ...


6

The phenomenon is called magnetostriction, and occurs when the oscillating magnetic field causes the cookware to change shape rapidly. This frequency will be twice that of the electromagnetic field of the cooker, which is typically over 20kHz, which means that the base frequency of the vibrations is well into the inaudible range of the spectrum. However, ...


6

Some approximate figures Energy efficiency while cooking Induction 90% Electric resistive 55% Gas 50% Energy efficiency while heating up Induction 99% Electric resistive 0% Gas 0% Time, total energy used, and cost to boil 2 l of Water Induction 2:20, 0.2 kWh, $0.034 Electric resistive 5:00, 0.34 kWh, $0.058 Gas 4:00, 0.37 kWh, $0.016 Assumptions Gas ...


6

You could use a thin disc of copper... Copper has a much higher melting point than does aluminum (1,984ºF or 1,084ºC vs 1,221ºF or 661ºC), is not ferromagnetic, and a thin (.025" or less) sheet should not have a profound effect on the magnetic field induced in the iron skillet. I have not tried this method, but it is scientifically plausible as well as ...


6

What kind of oil you're using would be helpful but, really, the answer is, whatever temperature it is you set it at, it's too hot. Turn the temperature down. The temperature gauges shouldn't necessarily be trusted to give you a perfect temperature reading. You can use an infrared thermometer to test it but your result tells everything, really. If your gas ...


6

You seem to be mixing up some things here. The difference is not between "normal" and "inductive". The difference is between pans which happen to have a ferromagnetic body, and thus work on induction, and all others. All pans with ferromagnetic body also work on resistive or gas stoves, so they are sold as "normal" pans, just like the non-ferromagnetic ...


6

No, your stove is fine to look at. If it is actually an induction stove, then the red would just be a light to let you know it's on. The actual induction heating won't make the cooktop glow red. You might just have an electric glass/ceramic cooktop, though, in which case the heating will make it glow red, but it's still safe. Things glowing from heat are ...


5

Most reputable sources say that curved surfaces such as woks don't work as well on induction stoves. They even make special tools and cooktops for inductively heating woks. This phenomenum could be because of the angled surface or the extra distance from the cooktop, but it's probably both. It's not that these surfaces are immune to induction heating, just ...


5

Depends on what you mean by "cost effective", and what expectations you have of cooking evenness. A solid fuel stove will probably be cheapest (grandma style wood or coal oven), followed by a resistive electric stove and the most expensive stove being induction electric. This covers the initial cost of the stove itself. The quality of heating goes along ...


5

I usually set the temperature to 150-200oC Forget the temperature setting of your induction stove. If it has any sensor at all (some don't), it is a sensor below the plate, far away from your pan and food. It has nothing to do with the real tempearature in your pan, and is a useless gimmick. Use the normal strength setting, and start with the lowest. If ...


5

Induction cooktops do not use lights to cook/heat. They use magnetic induction, which means there's a coil with electricity passing through it in the stove, which causes (induces) eddy currents to flow in the pan sitting on it, and as those dissipate the energy is turned into heat. All of this is completely safe, and in fact safer than other types of ...


5

I'm quite new to making omelettes, but when I make a thick/Spanish omelette on the stove (gas) I do a few things that help. I don't want to turn the grill on just to finish an omelette off, and the handle of my frying pan couldn't really take the grill anyway. Push the edges in at first as if cooking a French omelette (to make a thicker, stronger layer ...


4

One important factor in induction cooking is surface contact. This means that the base has to be sturdy. I have a carbon steel skillet similar to your option. After about one year, it's starting to warp. So, I wouldn't buy one, if I were you. You say that forged is thinner than cast iron... I'd go for the cast iron. As for the heat transfer, induction ...


4

For the most part and not denigrating anybody else's very valid opinions, I can definitely say that in my case the "noises" were caused by the fans getting slightly out of balance from collected grease etc. A good service and re- positioning of the fans on their axles always clears my noise problems. Do not forget that there are normally at least two fans, ...


4

I don't think there is any single answer to this question, because it would depend on: The type and thickness of the steak The starting temperature of the steak How well you like it done (because the goal is to get enough browning and crust development on the outside, without crossing over into burning, while still cooking the steak through) The ...


4

I am guessing you had a bit of fluid either on the bottom of the pan or on the top of your stove. It could have been almost any fluid including water. Even though your pans can get really hot, water trapped under a pan doesn't seem to boil away very quickly, and the longer the pot sits on top of the fluid, the thinner it is pressed, thus turning into a ...


4

Low, Medium, Medium-low, Medium-high and High are weasel-words so that manufacturers/recipe writers cannot be blamed for misuse of equipment/recipes, so a specific temperature range for medium heat cannot be given for just any cooker out there. For an oven, I use as a rule of thumb: 50-100°C (100-200°F) Low heat, 100-150°C (200-300°F) Medium low, 150-200°C (...


4

The things you need in a good induction pan are: The metal must be iron/steel, because induction stoves work using magetic fields they need a good sized flat section on the bottom, this is so that the material of the pan is as close to the field generator in the stove When shopping for induction pans bring a magnet, if it sticks to the bottom of the pan it ...


4

Considerations that apply to glass-ceramic cooktops also apply with induction: -Bottom should be relatively smooth so it does not scratch or break the cooktop -Bottom should be relatively flat (more important compared to gas, but less important compared to cast-iron electric) -Bottom should have a heat capacity suitable to the task (since the cooktop does ...


4

An induction cooktop is already more efficient than a conventional electric range, but there are some "gotchas" due to the way it works. The way an induction heating element works is via magnetic induction (hence the name), which means it's causing electrical currents to flow within the pan itself, which heats the metal (but don't worry, there's no way these ...


4

It seems really unlikely it somehow rusted shut or anything like that while you were boiling, so it seems most likely that there's just a partial vacuum inside. While boiling, it'd have been full of hot air and steam, and now that's all cooled down, and the steam has condensed, so it could shrink down you end up with low pressure inside sucking the lid down. ...


4

What I would do is invest in a $30 - $50 single induction hob that can be put on your counter, and see if the problem persists there. At the worst case, you just have an extra hob for stocks or something, but it could very well be that you'll have some success there, which gives you a hob that you could use for searing and such. It helps you to eliminate the ...


3

It sounds like the only thing you can do is use an interface disk - basically a piece of metal that is compatible with the induction cooktop, which will then transfer the heat to the espresso maker. You can also potentially use an induction-compatible pan as an interface - see this question. Unfortunately either way, you'll lose the fast-response benefit ...


3

I have an induction stove and have had similar marks. I think rumtscho is right; these are mineral deposits from water. Water gets between the surface and the pan, most likely because the base of the pan was initially wet (spillage from the pan will mostly end up beside it, and only areas directly under the pan will get significantly hot), the heat of the ...


3

You're perhaps missing a point about induction cooking when you bring heat transfer into the equation. Induction cooking is magnetic flux generating heat in the material, so the heat generation is virtually instantaneous; in fact, temperature "overshoot" is a bit of a problem in cast iron, so the skillet should remain on the "burner" surface for about three ...


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