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2

It is likely that it was a different metal that supports inductive currents, such as aluminium. The problem with aluminium is not that it can't create inductive current and heat up. It can, but it is rather inefficient on induction. Also, it has a very low melting point, so with thin aluminium, you risk melting it. Many induction units have artificially ...


4

Let me add to the other answers - this is mostly a too long comment trying to clarify some of their points. We have 3 physical effects that are important for heating the food inside the pot heat conduction: heat will flow from a hotter material to a colder material - the power (energy per time) depends crucially on the contact surface area. this contact ...


8

It would not work As Benjamin Kuykendall stated, you may place magnetic iron or steel under the pan. I will tell you why placing it in the pan won't work. Induction As the name states, induction cooking works through induction: The stove runs an alternating current through a coil, producing a changing magnetic field. This changing magnetic field then ...


46

The usual approach would be to put the steel disk under the pot. Such disks are even produced commercially for this purpose: look for an induction interface disk. The basic mechanism is straight forward. The disk heats due to electromagnetic induction; then heat moves from the disk to the cooking vessel via conduction. As long as your cooking vessel is a ...


0

Don't use newspaper. I tried it placing it on the burner to protect the cooktop as well as to catch spills and splatters. Though it did not catch fire, it did char and even got "ashy." Which I don't understand (how do you get ash if you don't have a fire?). I thought the newspaper would be ok because the salesman had demoed induction by placing a $10 bill ...


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