13

You use the leaves, not the carrot themselves. I don't know for sure this is what your Russian Civil War book was talking about, but I know it works, and besides, if they were desperate enough for acorn coffee and carrot tea, I imagine they were eating the carrots. This site suggests that you might need 1/4 cup of carrot greens per 1 cup of water; you can ...


13

This is a kind of emulsion called the Ouzo Effect (ouzo and other aniseed drinks also do this). I won't pretend to know enough to explain it, but it's essentially down to how oils (like those in fruit skin), water, and alcohol interact when stirred or otherwise agitated. Wikipedia has an article that explains it fully.


10

The tea will be stronger than you'd like if you steep it for too long. Over-steeping sometimes gives a bitter flavor as well. (I am guilty of frequently over-steeping as I have the attention span of a goldfish. Sometimes I remember to set a timer, sometimes not.)


9

wash, dry, shred, cut finely or julienne the carrots. dry it on a sheets of parchment paper until almost of the moisture is evaporated. then bake it in the oven on low heat until brown. http://img1.liveinternet.ru/images/attach/c/0//51/793/51793738_091127_ljv2.jpg result http://img1.liveinternet.ru/images/attach/c/0//51/793/51793915_091127_ljv3.jpg brew


8

It's down to oxidation reactions that are remarkably similar to those that cause meat and fats to go rancid. From Modernist Cuisine (2-98): ...[B]raised and pot roasted meats often develop a richer, more complex flavour if they have been cooled and aged after cooking, then later reheated for service. Surprisingly, the oxidation reactions that cause this ...


7

Adding herbs directly to baked goods usually results in very strong flavours. Infusing the sugar with the herbs gives a more subtle overtone rather than a full-on explosion. In some cases, of course, you might want a strong herb flavour, but where you just want a hint, infusing the sugar is great. The classic example is using stripped vanilla pods to make ...


6

While the amount of flavor can be a factor, often a bigger factor can be texture, or liquid released from the herbs when adding them directly. For example, when you infuse mint directly into cream, the mint will release enough liquid that the cream will no longer whip properly. Or with a meringue, you would rather have a smooth texture and even coloring ...


6

Try to remove as much of the pith as possible before drying peels or using them fresh. You can use a microplane or zester to remove rind without cutting into the pith. You can remove even more bitterness if you boil the rinds for one minute, drain, add fresh water and repeat. Do this several times.


6

It's all about balance: the fresh bright and stimulating effect of the early part of brewing, first minute or so, versus the calming deep flavours of the later part of brewing. some folks use more tea for less time to achieve that first effect; conversely, less for longer for the latter. stewing for 10min spoils a proper English cuppa. One trick worth ...


6

If it's only been soaked briefly, these options might be for immediate eating even if they'd otherwise keep. They're necessarily fairly general solutions as I don't know what sort of fruit you've got. Drain well and cover in dark chocolate. This works best for pieces that are 1-2 bites; smaller would be nice to eat but fiddly to make. Very good with ...


5

In sum: YES, sugar DOES really help to extract fruit flavors. The answer quoted in the edit does NOT imply that "absorption is slowed down" in general. It merely states that in a sugar solution, sugar will generally not move out of fruit; it doesn't say anything about what else happens. Osmosis is simply a process by which the stuff on both sides of a ...


5

This would be a really, really bad idea. The alkaloid compounds that make nightshades toxic can be toxic even at low levels, and a few of them are specifically alcohol soluble. This means that while chomping down on a tomato leaf might not hurt you, the toxins are readily extracted in alcohol, so you'd be maximizing your exposure to them by making a liqueur. ...


5

In addition to oxidation as put forward by @Stefano, you also have Slow chemical reactions between compounds. Oxidation is only one chemical reaction that happens, there are many more Concentration of flavors due to the evaporation of water will give a more intense flavor


5

Pasteurization will not do anything to reduce botulism risk. Botulinum spores are very hardy, requiring high temperatures (250f) to destroy them. If you use the method you describe, any spores that may exist will still be there, and a nonacidified, oxygen-free environment would be ideal for them to become active. So my recommendation would be to not take ...


5

The principle adverse affect is added astringency of your tea. If you like stronger tea, use a second bag and steep for less time.


5

The hotter the pepper, the shorter the infusion time, and the less time for the tequila to pick up any unwanted green vegetal flavor the thick skin of a jalapeño can impart (serious eats) For presentation you could possibly get away with one nice-looking, thin-skinned (and not too hot) red chilli in the bottle, after straining the tequila off the real ...


5

Cooking and infusing are different processes. When cooking with a spice you want it to release flavor and aroma into the food you're cooking with it, and usually you also enhance the flavor of the spice by frying / roasting it. For infusing you want to be more gentle so you don't add bitterness and don't destroy subtle flavors. You want to slowly release ...


4

Refrain from muddling, use more (fresh) basil, (try agitating,) and infuse for a longer duration; I quickly found one recipe for basil-infused vodka requiring a four day sit and two "fists" of basil. Vanilla and ginger can take a week, cucumber vodkas can entail a fourteen day sit. Some constituents will infuse quickly (habanero, strong flavor), some will ...


4

1) I do not think so, the technique was described in e.g. modernist cuisine, they suggest using a ISI siphone and if I can remember correctly does not describe any other tool. Any pressure chamber would work, if you have access to one :-) 2) I have something like this which can be charged with both soda and cream charges, that is what I woudl suggest. (mine ...


4

I know the carrot tea my grandmother did it* it's super deliceous ande easy to make, everyone must try it. All you have to do is to grate carrots as you would for soup or stew, and dry them in the oven at the 40-100 C. And when they are dryed out put some in a tea pot pour hot water, sweeten it with honey and milk (or simply drink without any added things)....


4

According to Harold McGee writing in the Curious Cook column of the New York times, despite widespread belief that tomato vines are poisonous, there is little actual supporting evidence that they are in fact poisonous: [T]here’s scant evidence for tomato toxicity in the medical and veterinary literature. I found just one medical case, an undocumented ...


3

It is almost certain that you do not have a gelatin in your mango infusion: gelatin is formed when an animal connective protein called collagen is hydrated at moderately high temperatures in the presence of water. Instead, what I suspect happened is that the pectin, a gelling agent present in fruits, including mangoes, has had long enough to dissolve into ...


3

Can you make bitters and spice-flavored tinctures at home? Absolutely you can! I do all the time - in fact, I've successfully engineered a couple of bitters recipes, and even gave a homemade "holiday" bitters to friends as a Christmas favor last year. The process itself is simple and easy; what is not easy is duplicating a commercial product such as ...


3

There's another reason for using infused sugar, and that's complexity - preparing the sugar would let one deal with a single more complex (and more predictable) ingredient, instead of more than one individual ingredient. So, if I had, say, orange peel sugar - I don't need to have orange zest on hand (or have to dig it out of wherever it may be hiding) if I ...


3

It's oil, not vinegar. The organic matter (herbs, garlic, whatever) that you put into the oil needs to be exceptionally clean and the infused oil should be used quickly, not stored, because stuff can grow in it. I would wash the fresh herbs or garlic very well and let them completely dry. Then, put into a pouch with the oil and vac seal. Cook at 147F to ...


3

You might be better off using a synthetic jam-straining bag. These have larger holes and are less absorbent and easier to clean. You will also extract more of the pulp from the layer of fruit stuck to the peel.


3

Every black tea bag contains around 25-110 mg of caffeine per serving. If you want more caffeine and tannins, of course 5 tea bags would contain more caffeine than a single bag. The reasons are: When you use a tea bag, caffeine, tannins diffuse out the tea leaves into the water. The longer you leave the tea bag/leaves in the water, the closer to ...


3

My Main question is this... At what point is the infusion done? This would largely depend on your definition of the word "Done". Your own research reveals a number of opinions on how long it takes for this process to reach completion. In any kind of infusion process the results are not linear. You likely get (something like) 70% infusion in 4 hours. Another ...


2

If you have access to an iSi or other whipped cream charger, you can use it to infuse very quickly, eliminating any off-colours or off-flavours that would develop from steeping. There are several posts on this process, including one at Cooking Issues and another at Playing with Fire and Water. It's really very simple, just add your flavouring agents to room-...


2

I regularly make various kinds of flavoured liquor. It can be difficult to get the exact same flavour as something you buy, unless they publish their recipe, but it is perfectly possible to get good results anyway. What kind of alcohol you start with depends on what kind of flavour you want to end up with. Vodka, at least the good quality stuff, lacks ...


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