11

Wash, dry, shred, cut finely or julienne the carrots. Dry it on a sheet of parchment paper until almost all of the moisture is evaporated. Bake it in an oven on low heat until brown. Left: result, Right: brewed. Source


10

The tea will be stronger than you'd like if you steep it for too long. Over-steeping sometimes gives a bitter flavor as well. (I am guilty of frequently over-steeping as I have the attention span of a goldfish. Sometimes I remember to set a timer, sometimes not.)


10

A simple way to do this is to place 250 grams of whole bean coffee and 500 grams of butter in a ziploc bag. Then place that in a water bath with a sous vide device set at 90C. Cook for 3 hours. Alternately, you can do this on the stove top. Very low heat, same amount of time. The longer you cook, the stronger the coffee flavor. Strain, discard beans, ...


8

It depends on what your exact requirements are. If you can live with something which tastes like butter+espresso, but is softer, pick an emulsifier, add it to the double shot of espresso, and then knead the butter into it. Assuming that by "block of butter" you mean 250 g of butter, and by a "double shot of espresso" you mean 50 ml, the ...


6

Try to remove as much of the pith as possible before drying peels or using them fresh. You can use a microplane or zester to remove rind without cutting into the pith. You can remove even more bitterness if you boil the rinds for one minute, drain, add fresh water and repeat. Do this several times.


6

It's all about balance: the fresh bright and stimulating effect of the early part of brewing, first minute or so, versus the calming deep flavours of the later part of brewing. some folks use more tea for less time to achieve that first effect; conversely, less for longer for the latter. stewing for 10min spoils a proper English cuppa. One trick worth ...


6

If it's only been soaked briefly, these options might be for immediate eating even if they'd otherwise keep. They're necessarily fairly general solutions as I don't know what sort of fruit you've got. Drain well and cover in dark chocolate. This works best for pieces that are 1-2 bites; smaller would be nice to eat but fiddly to make. Very good with ...


6

Oil is used to extract pepper flavor, as piperine is relatively non-polar. Its solubility in water (a polar solvent) is only 0.04 grams per liter. It is more soluble in less polar solvents (67 grams per liter in alcohol, for example). A related post: How to infuse black layer of peppercorn into an oil? Piperine has amide and benzodioxole functional groups,...


5

Cooking and infusing are different processes. When cooking with a spice you want it to release flavor and aroma into the food you're cooking with it, and usually you also enhance the flavor of the spice by frying / roasting it. For infusing you want to be more gentle so you don't add bitterness and don't destroy subtle flavors. You want to slowly release ...


5

The hotter the pepper, the shorter the infusion time, and the less time for the tequila to pick up any unwanted green vegetal flavor the thick skin of a jalapeño can impart (serious eats) For presentation you could possibly get away with one nice-looking, thin-skinned (and not too hot) red chilli in the bottle, after straining the tequila off the real ...


5

The principle adverse affect is added astringency of your tea. If you like stronger tea, use a second bag and steep for less time.


5

In sum: YES, sugar DOES really help to extract fruit flavors. The answer quoted in the edit does NOT imply that "absorption is slowed down" in general. It merely states that in a sugar solution, sugar will generally not move out of fruit; it doesn't say anything about what else happens. Osmosis is simply a process by which the stuff on both sides of a ...


4

I know the carrot tea my grandmother did it* it's super deliceous ande easy to make, everyone must try it. All you have to do is to grate carrots as you would for soup or stew, and dry them in the oven at the 40-100 C. And when they are dryed out put some in a tea pot pour hot water, sweeten it with honey and milk (or simply drink without any added things)....


3

My Main question is this... At what point is the infusion done? This would largely depend on your definition of the word "Done". Your own research reveals a number of opinions on how long it takes for this process to reach completion. In any kind of infusion process the results are not linear. You likely get (something like) 70% infusion in 4 hours. Another ...


3

Every black tea bag contains around 25-110 mg of caffeine per serving. If you want more caffeine and tannins, of course 5 tea bags would contain more caffeine than a single bag. The reasons are: When you use a tea bag, caffeine, tannins diffuse out the tea leaves into the water. The longer you leave the tea bag/leaves in the water, the closer to ...


3

You might be better off using a synthetic jam-straining bag. These have larger holes and are less absorbent and easier to clean. You will also extract more of the pulp from the layer of fruit stuck to the peel.


3

You can't do it, it's physically not possible. Your meat will always taste of meat, not of sauce. Meat is not some kind of sponge which can soak up sauce, it's a dense muscle. If you want more flavorful meat, you can buy more flavorful meat. Most meat you can get in the supermarket is tasteless, because 1) people don't really like meat flavor if they are ...


3

There's another reason for using infused sugar, and that's complexity - preparing the sugar would let one deal with a single more complex (and more predictable) ingredient, instead of more than one individual ingredient. So, if I had, say, orange peel sugar - I don't need to have orange zest on hand (or have to dig it out of wherever it may be hiding) if I ...


3

Can you make bitters and spice-flavored tinctures at home? Absolutely you can! I do all the time - in fact, I've successfully engineered a couple of bitters recipes, and even gave a homemade "holiday" bitters to friends as a Christmas favor last year. The process itself is simple and easy; what is not easy is duplicating a commercial product such as ...


2

I regularly make various kinds of flavoured liquor. It can be difficult to get the exact same flavour as something you buy, unless they publish their recipe, but it is perfectly possible to get good results anyway. What kind of alcohol you start with depends on what kind of flavour you want to end up with. Vodka, at least the good quality stuff, lacks ...


2

MY OBSERVATIONS SO FAR: I once left sloes with intact skins (not pricked) in water overnight to clean them. Nearly all the bigger ones split their skins so I disposed of them in case they made the gin cloudy. After adding gin (37.5% ABV) to just cover the remaining small hard sloes, the colour is a beautiful clear red after 2 weeks. The sloes are still ...


2

If you use cheesecloth just make sure it either hasn't been used before or it has been cleaned thoroughly with scalding hot water. If you just smell it, you'll be able to tell if there is any residue on the cheesecloth that will transfer flavor/smell to the applesauce. Cheesecloth can be hard to clean, but with a new cheesecloth, you'll definitely have ...


2

I think you're getting a little caught up on minutiae. True, oil & water [or tomato purée] don't mix - however, oils & water can be emulsified. In other words you can create a mixture that appears to be a single liquid - like a solution - even though one is actually suspended in the other rather than being permanently intermixed. You can 'fix' ...


2

You should be fine. In fact, there is advice on preserving fresh herbs by freezing them in ice cube trays filled with oil - I tried it once, and enjoyed the results. So I'm pretty sure the flavored oil will also keep well. Maybe not as perfect as on the first day, but still plenty of aroma.


2

There are many chemical compounds in tea, and some more more soluble than others. So a short steep will extract the more soluble compounds, while not extracting much of the less soluble ones. The time when it starts getting bad is a function of both the tea and the water temperature. I personally like stronger teas (5-15 minute steep in hot water), but I ...


2

You can add some liquid to mayonnaise without breaking it. I've added smallish amounts of soy sauce and hot sauce and such to mayonnaise with success. The question would be, could you get enough coconut flavor into the mayonnaise before breaking the emulsion? Hard to say without trying. If it doesn't work, you can try using coconut cream instead of ...


2

Depending on the type of coconut milk you have access to, you could only use the upper, creamy part of the coconut milk. Here in Germany (and the Netherlands, as we often buy there) the out of the box coconut milk is not homogenized, so the fat and the watery part have split. Coconut Cream might be an option, but it is quite sweet. Perhaps a light variant ...


2

If you do not want to dilute the mayonnaise with liquid, coconut milk powder is an option. Depending on how much you add, you might find that your mayo is too thick. If that is the case, you could get around this by making up a paste beforehand with a little water. https://www.tesco.com/groceries/en-GB/products/268726658


1

You're right - a sauce of fried tomato concentrate or other water-based ingredients floating about in oil would not be very appetizing, taste of much, or adhere to the pasta very well. But tomato purée is often 'fried out' at a higher temperature than would be possible after adding water-based ingredients, to caramelize it, giving it a deeper, more complex ...


1

Good ol' Chef John has a solution right here. Basically, you want to enclose your garlic in some kind of container that lets them move around fairly easily. He uses two bowls, a commenter suggests a jar, I suppose it depends on the number of garlic cloves you want to peel. Close the container then start shaking away, maybe for 20-30 seconds or longer once ...


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