46

If you premix to make a rub, it's easier to apply spices evenly. Otherwise, you must individually apply a small amount (for example, 1/4 tsp) of several spices evenly. With a rub, you make the spice mixture with the desired proportions, and there is a larger aggregate amount to spread.


33

The answer it seems is - no, you can't just use any variety of corn. It seems that you need in particular a hard shell around the kernel that is not present in sweetcorn varieties. I also suspect that it is harder to make than one might imagine, you need a specific percentage of water in the kernel to get it to pop - this is why you can't store unpopped ...


31

Your question goes near the answer. As you can read on those nifty tables on products, calories come from mainly three sources: Fats, sugars and protein. There are also fibres, alcohol (that are not counted as carbs) like ethanol and organic acids but the first three is packed with them. So fat have 9 kcal/g, carbs 4kcal/g and proteins also 4 kcal/g (...


30

The primary use of beer in a beer batter is its alcohol, which disrupts gluten formation and needs less heat than water to evaporate, improving the texture of the final crust. For flavor, most recipes using beer do best with a malty, low-bitterness beer, like a marzen, scotch ale, or (maybe) amber ale. Highly-hopped "put hair on your chest" IPAs are a bad ...


26

tl;dr: Yes, there are significant differences ... but use them as guidelines, don't just blindly follow recipes. (Jacques Pépin agrees) Part of the size issue that Jefromi mentioned is not only growing conditions (hotter/dryer/morning sun/in a greenhouse/etc), but there are typically different varietals of things. Eggplant is one of the most significant --...


26

Yes, there are differences. Unfortunately, many potatoes have been bred for crop yield and storage over flavor ... and so the flavor differences that you might see in South America don't tend to be so prevalent in the US and Europe. "Factory farming" in many ways started because of potatoes. McDonalds wanted to get rid of regional differences in ...


24

The role of buttermilk in most recipes, including waffles, is to provide acid into the reaction with baking soda to cause it to 'rise' more. The thickness helps the batter retain the air pockets that the acid + baking soda creates when heat is applied, resulting in a 'lighter fluffier' waffle.


24

It's a children's book, but The Popcorn Book by Tomie de Paola is actually a very comprehensive summary on the history and science of popcorn. Popcorn pops because the kernels contain small amounts of moisture which, when heated, cook the starches inside the popcorn, causing them to rapidly expand and exploding out the kernel. (This is my basic ...


23

If the potatoes are the same in different packages, it's just marketing. Some potatoes are better for baking, some for frying, some for mashing... It mostly depends on the starch content. See. https://www.thekitchn.com/know-your-potato-which-variety-is-best-for-mashing-roasting-baking-178265 or "Potatoes fall into two important categories that impact ...


22

In the UK there are two main cuts of bacon. There's "streaky bacon", which is cut from the pork belly. This is mostly what you get in the US. There's also "back bacon" which is cut from the pork loin. This is generally more popular and is very much leaner than streaky bacon. In the US you call it "Canadian bacon". You can also get "middle bacon" which ...


19

Italy is very protective of its food heritage and there are many examples of recipes being officially codified by various authorities, e.g, the EU designation, Traditional Speciality Guaranteed, was applied to pizza margherita in 2009 and strictly mandates the ingredients that may be used. The recipe for Ragu alla Bolognese doesn't have the weight of the ...


19

The Environmental Defense Fund has made a few recommendations based on EPA guidance: Canned white, or albacore (0.32 parts per million of mercury). Children under six can eat up to one 3-ounce portion a month; children from 6–12, two 4.5-ounce portions a month. Adults, including pregnant women, can safely eat it up to three times a month (women, 6-ounce ...


18

An additional factor is prep time. You can make a large batch of spice mix quickly, spooning tablespoons rather than quarter teaspoons and then it's made ready for many portions. Dry mixes keep as well as unmixed spices so you really can make big batches even if you don't get through it very fast.


17

More explicit answer for the USA: USDA says that bacon is not graded. Is bacon inspected and graded? All bacon found in retail stores is either USDA inspected for wholesomeness or inspected by State systems that have standards equal to the Federal government. Each animal, from which the bacon is made, is inspected for signs of disease. The "Inspected ...


15

No, you need popping corn. Popcorn works because it contains the right kind of starch; it has a hard husk that is quite waterproof; it contains the right amount of moisture (14–20%, according to Wikipedia). When you cook the corn, the water turns to steam, and the husk stops the steam escaping until the pressure builds up enough to make the kernel explode ...


15

Notwithstanding the two current answers - that it's really hard to guess - there's an additional concern. In terms of actual flavour rather than simple heat, you can taste (& smell) habanero in pretty much anything, even at low concentrations. It's a fabulous aromatic. Cayenne, on the other hand, is really almost flavourless in comparison. So, as well ...


14

The culprit is the pineapple. Raw pineapple contains bromelain, an enzyme that breaks down the protein in your milk, making it bitter. The same principle is applied when bromelain is used as meat tenderizer, either as powdered additive or as fruit-based brine. This process takes a short while, so if you used pineapple in your cereal and eat it right away, ...


12

As far as I am aware, you cannot recognize this in advance. What you describe is due to very damaged cell structure in the fish. The "water" are the fluids contained in and around the fish cells, which make the filets juicy. They flow out when the cell walls in the fish rupture. The reason for rupturing is that the fluids are water-based, and water ...


12

@Stefano's answer is obviously the accepted one, linking to the thing closest to being an official recipe. I still want to add an alternative answer though, that includes some empirical evidence. It combines the results from recipes highly ranked by Google with the ingredients from that official recipe. After gathering the recipes (and assigning the "...


11

East Asian soy milk and American soy milk taste very different, and not just because of added ingredients like sugar and emulsifiers. Soy beans contain an enzyme called lipoxidase, which breaks down unsaturated fatty acids into shorter chain lipids. For American markets, manufacturers presoak the beans in solvents such as calcium hydroxide in order to ...


11

We metropolitan French distinguish "levure chimique" and "levure organique" (also called "levure de boulanger"). The first one is baking powder (the carbonated molecule), the latter is yeast (the fungi). If there is only "levure" written, it generally means "levure chimique" (baking powder), as it is more readily available, rises faster, and doesn't need to ...


11

In general, things should be quite similar, and the biggest thing you'll have to worry about is size. There can be really drastic differences in the "normal" size of a given thing from country to country; a large onion in Egypt might be half the size of a large onion in the US. So if you can find recipes that specify actual quantities, whether weight or ...


11

I don't think the alcohol affects the tase in this kind of perparation. The point is to create surface of contact by using the gases in the beverage. Usually in restaurants that serves this kind of dish they use sparkling water or any cheap beer. And for a extra crispness you can add the batter into a whipped cream dispenser charged with CO2 cartridges ...


10

Most of the popular soy milk in the US is sweetened, thickened and flavored. It's also may have ingredients added as stabilizers, preservatives, the usual. East Asian style soy milk is simply the result of grinding mature soy beans (usually dry ones that have been soaked in water) and water and then straining the result. The differences would be pretty ...


10

Fat + flour form a roux, the base for creamy/starchy soups and sauces. You don't give details, but Cajun recipes often let the flour/fat mixture get rather dark, which will contribute more flavour while significantly reducing the binding properties, so I suppose this is the case here, too. Rule of thumb: Lighter for thickening, darker for flavour. The ...


10

I am going to say that in most cases, labels like premium, artisan, etc. are marketing gimmicks. I do not know of any labeling rules that will tell you a given bacon is from a better quality pork belly than another. But, there is certainly a difference, and cheap bacon is just that, cheap and been made from the cheapest pork bellies obtained in mass. In ...


9

My grandparents were Western Nebraska farmers who grew corn (and other things.) Most was "field corn" which is suitable only for livestock feed. Some was sweet corn, which is for humans. Grandma used to make what she called "parched corn." Sweet corn was dried out by pulling the husks back and hanging the ears down by tacking the husks to the side of the ...


8

All crisp-bread recipes use water (or at least some ingredient with a high water content), but the bread is baked and then hung from the ceiling to dry further until the water content is very much reduced. The real mystery is how structure is introduced without leavening. Wikipedia has good information on this point, [...] bubbles are introduced into the ...


8

You can easily replace the liquid in most bread recipes with beer. This can have a very pronounced effect on your final dough as there is a lot more chemical and biological fun happening in beer than there is in water. In my experience, the dough with beer will usually rise faster than a similar dough with water. Generally, the flavor difference won't be ...


8

My partner has a very sensitive "dirt-flavor" sense... One of the ingredients that may be found in salsa that often triggers it for her is cumin.


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