20

Beef cut does matter. Sirloin tip is a relatively tender cut, cuts that have done more work like shoulder, round, leg cuts have more connective tissue and need a significantly longer cooking time. In a pressure cooker this isn't that long, 1 hour is what I've seen for instant pot recipes using working cuts. Also what matters is fat content. Whatever you ...


17

I've actually tried it. It didn't work very well for me, but it might work better for you. The problem is, cookers like the Instant Pot are designed for quick pressure cooking first and foremost. While they have a "slow cook" or "keep warm" setting, the heating element is still driven at high power, just at a lower duty cycle. Over time, ...


14

I agree with Sneftel's answer that the quality is likely to degrade over time due to contents settling and breaking down into stuff that doesn't taste good. But just to add a thought regarding safety: food that's kept above 140F should in theory be safe indefinitely (see my answer to related question here). However, I'd be concerned about the proposed idea ...


8

Hard to know how this translates to the pressure cooker context, but I've made stroganoff many times over the years in a skillet using a variety of cuts of beef, and I've never noticed that much of a difference in the quality. I've used London Broil, flank steak, skirt steak, flat iron steak, sirloin and probably others that I'm not remembering. What's ...


4

Your digital thermometer may come with a calibrate function where you place it in either ice cold or boiling water and adjust accordingly. Once you have done this, compare the temperature with your IP and this should show you which is the most out (if recalibrating has been required). https://www.foodrepublic.com/2011/04/04/how-to-calibrate-your-food-...


3

I don't see why not. I make channa masala from scratch - fry onions, garlic, chilli, add spices, drop soaked chickpeas ...and enough extra water so it will absorb and evaporate in the required time. That's your only bit of guesswork, but for soup that's probably not as crucial as for a dish which is served almost dry. What may be your sticking point - ...


2

There is no such thing as a mixed material containing "x percent steel", unless you are talking an inhomogenous composite material (which would be most certainly more expensive than using all steel, and wouldn't look metallic). A metal alloy is either a steel (stainless or not stainless), or it isn't a steel. There are thousands of stainless steel types (...


2

In all good conscience, the only recommendations I could follow would be USDA or an equally authoritative source, and they only recommend pressure canning at a minimum of 240F. At 4000-6000 feet, that requires 13 lbs pressure for dial or 15 for weighted (as the weights are normally only 10 or 15 lbs). They make no allowances for increasing time as you can ...


1

Considering this in the context of the earlier "everlasting stew" discussion, it's worth noting that there are certain ingredients which must be cooked using sustained high temperature. One notable example is red kidney beans which contain a protein which must be denatured (by boiling for ten minutes or so) before they are safe to eat. The ...


1

When reheating any kind of rice, you will need to add water to it (with white rice, just covering the container with a damp paper towel works). However, brown rice does not reheat well at all; and from personal experience it is exactly how you describe it. So what we do when we cook rice for our meals, is we throw it in the rice cooker as we shower and get ...


1

The answer is you may have to experiment. I believe the problem lies in the fact that more water takes longer to reach temperature, given the same burner arrangement. This means whatever you have inside the pot is exposed to the lower grade heat for a longer period and by the time you reach full pressure, the food may already be over cooked. I have not ...


1

I have't done it, so I don't know if this will work, but here's what I would suggest: Pasta will cook more quickly if you soak it before cooking. (it also allows you to get 'al dente' with gluten-free pasta) You can then put the pasta in the inner pot, while the meatballs are closer to the heat. But you might have to experiment for just how long to soak ...


1

The cut of beef used for stoganoff matters somewhat. I learned how to make Beef Stroganoff from a Graham Kerr TV show back in the 1980s (back before he went all healthy and still made great food). I still use that same recipe today with only a few tweaks and one major one. On that show he used a tenderloin of beef. I thought that, for me, this was a ...


1

You're correct, the water ratios may be slightly different between different types of noodles. In general, you're covering the noodles so that they will actually have a chance to soak up the water though, as with a pressure cooker, you don't have a chance to stir the noodles and ensure equal saturation. When making pasta in the instant pot, you'll also need ...


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