5

As near as I can determine, "nacho sliced" is simply a marketing term for such pre-sliced, pickled jalapeno peppers. A quick Google for the term brings up several brands which appear identical to one another. There are also similar combinations of the words such as "nacho jalapenos, sliced". The bottle on the right is the only one labelled as such, but ...


4

Likely the bitterness has nothing to do with this particular combination of ingredients. Rather, the blending process can break down the structures of each of the ingredients far more thoroughly then chopping and allows bitter compounds to leach out and saturate the overall mixture. Garlic in particular can be bitter if it's been pulverized, but it gets ...


3

Freezing is definitely the way to go. It’ll soften the peppers, but smoking softens them anyway. Dehydrating them will allow them to burn before they’re smoked through, since the water in the peppers’ flesh is needed to keep the interior temperature under control during long smoking.


3

Cut the tiniest amount off the tip of the jalapeño and put it on your tongue: after a few times, you'll get a feel of how hot individual ones are and you'll just know after a few times if you have to add the entire big not-throat-burning one or half a tiny running-around-screaming-hot one. No, it's safe: the tip contains the least amount of capsicum (If ...


3

The heat of individual peppers varies. Add a little bit at a time, tasting as you go. You can put more in, you can't take any out!


3

After many attempts at trying to keep my batter on my stuffed poppers as they are deep fried, I finally found what works best. I roll the stuffed peppers in flour (I season it with salt and a bit of corn meal), then I dip them in milk. Then, I return them to the flour for a final roll. After that, I dip them completely in batter (similar to a pancake ...


3

Through experimentation, I got the answer. The answer is rice vinegar, a little sugar, a little salt (not so much salt and sugar as to make the vinegar seem like "seasoned rice vinegar" as for sushi, just a pinch of each) and time. After two days in the fridge the sliced fresh jalapenos mellow a bit, but they seem even a little crunchier than when they were ...


2

I'd go with Bird's Eyes, or as they're sometimes called, 'finger' chillies. I'd define it as skinny, thin skin, lots of seeds - finger tend to be larger, green; bird's eye smaller, red. The trouble with chillies is that they can all look a bit alike & trying to buy one very specific type is really not easy. Is it a jalapeño, is it a fresno or a serrano… ...


2

If they are less hot than jalepeno peppers and more crispy then they probably aren't jalapeno peppers, or at least not standard ones. There are hundreds of pepper varieties and many look very similar but have different heat properties, and different textures. Or they could be jalepenos but grown in cooler conditions or different soil from your typical ...


2

It might be a case of changing packaging; I've often seen two identical products from the same brand labelled differently, and by a few weeks later one of them has vanished due to a phased release of a new branding. Notice how the pattern on the label is brighter, and the whole label is slightly taller, giving more room for the photo of food on the top. The ...


2

You can certainly leave the seeds in (there is no food safety issue), but the peppers themselves will be affected by the freezing. Peppers have a tendency to be somewhat mushy when thawed out. That's usually fine in when they are cooked or put in something soft, but may not be great on something like nachos. Blanching is only needed if you want to peel the ...


2

This looks great, and if it was offered in a restaurant I expect it to be called a 'Fresh Jalapeño Salsa'. That would give me all the information I would need when deciding to order or not.


2

Yes you can. Just take the peppers out of the freezer and thaw and drain. Then use them as usual in your jelly or pepper mustard...whatever recipe you want. I freeze mine all the time.As a matter of fact, doing so now.


1

wondered what the name of that type of sauce would be? As you commented in another Q, salsa would be out, as that leads to tomato. Your dominant ingredients are peppers (chilies, jalapeno): pimiento or aji Your preparation is chopped: picada. Looks spicy: picante Combinations that come to mind: Picante Picada Pimiento Picada Pimiento Picante Picada Aji ...


1

I go through quite a lot of chillies, so what I would do is mince a bunch of jalapenos, and add it to your soup a spoonful at a time. Keep the rest in the fridge for later. The law of averages should mean that the chilli blend as a whole is neither too hot nor too mild.


1

If you peruse ethnic supermarkets, you'll often find pickled jalapeños that are cut into slabs (cut from stem to tip, often jarred with carrots and onions in the brine, too. It's also possible that the skin might be removed). It's often labeled as 'jalapeños en escabeche' I suspect that 'nacho sliced' is simply those cut into little circular sections ...


1

If it's a great big shiny Jalapeno, chances are it's a Texas A&M mild Jalapeno (TAM). Very popular with farmers because yield is good, and fruit is pretty. Stores lik3e it for same reasons. Organoleptically speaking, you may as well get a bell pepper. They're not hot. Usually best to kick it up a notch with something like Serranos, they're about as hot ...


1

You can recognize them by looking at strech marks more of them the hotter jalapenio ill be


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