Hot answers tagged

61

What about a piping bag? Fill the bag with a spatula, pipe into the bottle.


48

Jam is set with pectin or it is syrup. Period. If you are not adding pectin then you are relying on whatever pectin is available in the fruit you use. Strawberries don't have a lot. Oranges have a good amount but it's in the peel- thus the existence of marmalade. Pectin requires sugar and acid to set. The sugar is not going to prevent a normal jam from ...


37

I would probably just follow the recipes. If they're good, the amount of additional pectin they call for is what's necessary to get the jam to set well. If you use less than that, it might end up really runny. Different kinds of fruit have different amounts of pectin, and it's not evenly distributed through the fruit. For example, apples and pears have a ...


23

This step is not about food safety, it's about consistency and in fact about three properties of your jam: Jam comes in a wide variation of consistencies, one parameter is "stiffness", another "water content" and a third "smoothness". In baking, you want smooth (no lumps) jam that is speadable enough to form a thin layer (especially if used as a "glue"), ...


21

You don't mention what variety of banana you have access to. There is a host of banana varieties and they all have different characteristics in regard to flavor and texture. I will assume that you are referring to the Cavendish variety that is ubiquitous in the west. Cavendish bananas, when ripe, are very fragile. They go mushy easily and oxidize ...


18

this answer is an addition to Jefromi's answer To extract and activate the pectin from fruit, you need a certain cooking time - that's one of the reasons our ancestors cooked jam for up to two hours or until it visibly thickened. And the fruit will likely taste different after such a long time, which may or may not be desired. Modern recipes with added ...


16

Sure it's safe, there's no risk in putting jam in baked goods. It says refrigerate after opening so it doesn't spoil after being left out too long - some people don't realize it needs to be refrigerated after opening because it is stored in the cupboard before opening. The important thing for food safety is to make sure that the pastries are eaten soon ...


12

The important part of the system are the lids. The ideal lids are the Mason-type (no matter which company produced them), with a flat top and a separate side piece with thread. Another type that works is the older Weck style jar, which consists of a glass jar with glass lid, plus rubber steal and metal clamps, no threads. This system is as safe as the ...


12

Edited: Concerns were expressed about such items being suited for food use. I've added comments in the text on "Food Grade" items plus a note at the end. How can I get a very thick or viscous paste (e.g. caramel, ganache, thick mayonnaise) into small-necked squeeze bottles without heating it up? Consider using a "grease gun" as used by mechanics. These ...


11

You are thinking of jelly like actual jelly in a can: Sweetened fruit juice thickened with pectin. While some bakeries use special pectin to make glazes (look at LM pectins) most jelly fillings and glazes are made with starch. In the US, usually corn starch. Jelly donut filling is like canned pie filling: a sugar syrup that is thickened with starch. This ...


10

It sounds like the persimmons (or one of the persimmons) were not quite ripe enough. When you eat an unripe astringent persimmon (American or Asian) the mouth immediately draws up. Sometimes you'll get a hint of sweetness (if it is near-ripe) but the mouth-feel is immediate. Tannins in persimmons make your tongue, cheeks, and gums feel as though ...


10

The term rouhe in Finnish means "something coarsely ground" [1], [2]. (Google translates it as "groats", but that's a bit too simple.) Double-checking with the English, German and Italian version of the shop, they always use a version of "grain or granule" in the specific language: Note that "granello" in Italian, for example, which is about the shape, not ...


10

There are thick food grade syringes being made for that kind of application.. https://www.amazon.com/Syringes/dp/B07C71C1LH/ The plunger comes out at the back easily, so you can pour your sauce into the syringe, and then inject it into your dispensing bottle.


9

In addition to Sobachatina's very good answer: Some fruit contain a lot of natural pectin. Black and red currants are a prime example of that (they also contain a lot of acid, to set the pectin). I sometimes have the problem that my currant syrup becomes jelly by accident (one year even my currant juice started to set...). My grandma always mixed high pectin ...


8

No! A cup of salt is an enormous amount and would be dangerous for anyone who ate it, although they are unlikely to be able to swallow it in the first place as it would taste awful. Preserving vegetables can be done with or without preservative agents like sugar, salt, and acid but you won't be able to use your bread machine's jam making function. I would ...


8

In addition to the two answers already posted, I thought I should mention that pectin is not present in all fruits in great enough quantities to thicken jam, which is another reason a recipe may call for pectin. Generally speaking, the sharper fruits tend to contain the higher levels of pectin, such as apples, raspberries, and any citrus fruit. Fruits ...


7

There'll be a lot of variation depending on temperature, humidity, the exact nature of the jam, and pure dumb luck, but I wouldn't be surprised if it started growing mold within a week, if not within a day or two. When things say to refrigerate after opening, they tend to mean it.


7

If your jam has at least 1:1 ratio (1 kg of sugar per kg of fruit) or more, you do not have to can it. Then it is so overwhelmingly sweet that bacteria cannot live in it. If the jam has less sugar (1:2 are popular, 1:3 are found sometimes), then you have to either can it, or keep it in the fridge and consume it within a few days, similar to any other ...


7

Yep. No problem at all. This is standard practise for using up left over pastry: jam tarts. Just be careful to let the jam cool down before you bite into it. You don't want molten jam all over the roof of your mouth.


7

Most fresh fruits will lose their "sweet fresh flavor" when cooked. (*geeky stuff at end) When making jams, jellies etc., a good amount of sugar is added. This is done for a couple of reasons, the first is to combine with acid and pectin for thickening, the second is for flavor. When making jam, the proportion of sugar to fruit will be somewhere between 40-...


6

Yes. See the accepted answer for Can most sour fruits be jelled by cooking with sugar?. After getting that answer, I have successfully made apple jelly with fresh cooked and strained apple juice and sugar, and nothing else. You can search for apple jelly recipes and find directions.


6

Graininess caused by excess undissolved sugar is fairly obvious. The grains will be sweet and will dissolve on the tongue. Alternatively, with some fruit including blueberries, the skins of the fruit can be dry or tough and stay in grainy fragments in the jam. Again, this is obvious. The individual shreds will be dark and flat, etc. Another, in my opinion, ...


6

You just need to work out your forearms more. :) If food gets on the rim of the jar it can greatly add to the friction after the lid is on. It actually makes the whole process unreliable- the food might prevent a seal from forming or it might harden and make the lid difficult to remove- either way make sure the rim of the jar is clean. Canning jars create ...


6

The historical purpose of jam is to preserve fruit from a time of bounty to a time when it is less plentiful. Therefore, to be a candidate for jam making, the fruit must be reasonably plentiful in the region where it would be preserved. Technically, in order to form a jam or a jelly, there must be sufficient pectin and sufficient acid in the fruit to ...


6

From the description "Rock-solid" you guess correctly that you have overcooked your jam mixture. The process of overcooking your jam mixture results in most of the water content evaporating. In candy terms, your jam is probably somewhere between Hard-Ball stage to Caramelized stage. For jelly/jam you want the temperature around 220 degree F. Hard ball ...


6

You absolutely can make jam from frozen fruit. Freezing is like "stopping time" (or at least slowing it down almost to a stop) for the frozen food. Freezing water breaks cell walls, that's why thawed fruit is mushy, but so does boiling when making jam, so no problem at all here. You can also freeze leftover fruit before it spoils and combine various fruits ...


6

There are two parts to the process of making jams, marmalades (and the like) shelf stable for extended periods: The first part is the recipe - It must contain the correct combination of fruit, sugar, acid and pectin. (If the sugar ratio is not correct it may lead to mold or yeast growth.) The second part is the canning - Using sanitized canning jars and ...


6

TL;DR: likely because demand was too low to sustain commercial distribution Barring any relationship to a specific historical incident, it's very difficult to find out why a specific food is no longer commercially produced. In the absence of specific reasons, we can see a number of contributing factors as to why grape preserves would have gone off the ...


5

Recipes for preserving tend to be very specific. They're calibrated to balance factors like pH and sugar content in the final recipes, and of course to minimize the risk of spoilage. In general, you should always follow the steps as written in your recipe. What I've generally observed is that jam-type recipes don't always include the final boiling step ...


5

If it's getting cooked too much, well, stop cooking it. You can cover it to prevent water loss. If it's too hot sitting on the same burner (on an electric stove), move the pot. It sounds like your cast-iron pot might be part of the problem, too - if it's still staying too hot, you could pour it into something else. Finally, if you do still have significant ...


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