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48

Jam is set with pectin or it is syrup. Period. If you are not adding pectin then you are relying on whatever pectin is available in the fruit you use. Strawberries don't have a lot. Oranges have a good amount but it's in the peel- thus the existence of marmalade. Pectin requires sugar and acid to set. The sugar is not going to prevent a normal jam from ...


12

The important part of the system are the lids. The ideal lids are the Mason-type (no matter which company produced them), with a flat top and a separate side piece with thread. Another type that works is the older Weck style jar, which consists of a glass jar with glass lid, plus rubber steal and metal clamps, no threads. This system is as safe as the ...


9

In addition to Sobachatina's very good answer: Some fruit contain a lot of natural pectin. Black and red currants are a prime example of that (they also contain a lot of acid, to set the pectin). I sometimes have the problem that my currant syrup becomes jelly by accident (one year even my currant juice started to set...). My grandma always mixed high pectin ...


5

TL;DR: likely because demand was too low to sustain commercial distribution Barring any relationship to a specific historical incident, it's very difficult to find out why a specific food is no longer commercially produced. In the absence of specific reasons, we can see a number of contributing factors as to why grape preserves would have gone off the ...


4

For home pressure canning, you should always use a Mason jar (Ball is one brand, but there are others). A "Mason jar" is the kind with the two-piece lid. When using home equipment, the two-piece lid is important because it will seal properly inside the pressure vessel. If you use a jar with a one-piece lid, such as in your photo, the lid tightness needs to ...


4

There could be a couple reasons for this: Leaving the tomatoes in sugar allows them to macerate, which breaks down the cell walls and pulls water from the fruit, making them much softer. If your recipe calls for pectin the sugar may be for gelling. Pectin needs sugar in order to gel properly, and the maceration probably introduces more sugar into the ...


4

Blueberries are generally low-pectin fruits, so many jam recipes and jam making guides specifically call for adding pectin. That said, some do not - but these use the whole pureed fruit. When you filter out the seeds and skin, you remove much of what pectin there is in blueberries naturally, leaving you with runny jam. The solution, then, is to add pectin ...


4

Beside the other answers, you are on the right track with the "add enough sugar and cook down more" part. Alton Brown has an episode where he prepares orange marmelade using a thermometer, and explains that it is actually a form of candymaking - you take your orange-flavored sugar to a specific stage below softball. I have seen marmalade from other fruit ...


4

I use apple. Just puree it in a blender, about 1/2 medium apple per 2 cups of other fruit (more if you like a thicker consistency). I like the natural pectin. Apple doesn't really impart much flavor or too big a change in the consistency of the other fruit. But if you are worried, just quarter the apple and fish the chunks out before canning.


3

There is no way to predict the amount you want. If you want to know it, the only way is extensive experimentation. You observed two outcomes, which I will call "amber" and "boiled" for short. If I got you right, you assume that the difference between them is determined by the amount of sugar, and are asking about the minimal amount of sugar to reach the "...


3

I'm posting this as an answer even though I really have very little experience, just some vague stuff I've picked up along the way. The pith is all about bitterness. Bitter is a big part of the flavor profile of marmalade. So, how much pith you want to use is very subjective. How bitter do you like it? That's the difference in recipes. Personally, I like ...


3

Speaking from a different dish: when I make citrus caramel I have to blanch the citrus peels a few times (three times mostly). It greatly reduces bitterness from the white part of the skin. Here's Kenji-Lopez Alt's take on it.


2

Most commercial pint- and quart-size mayonnaise or salad dressing jars may be used with new two-piece lids for canning acid foods. However, you should expect more seal failures and jar breakage. These jars have a narrower sealing surface and are tempered less than Mason jars, and may be weakened by repeated contact with metal spoons or knives used in ...


2

One thing to remember with food safety is that questions like "is my food safe/contaminated/edible" can't be answered with a simple yes/no. There's no way to be certain if eating a given food will without question make you sick; even if you were to sample and test for bacteria and toxins, you could simply have missed a contaminated portion, or there might ...


1

I received the following response from Bonne Maman in France Dear Mr. XXX, Thank you for contacting Bonne Maman®. We are always happy to hear from our consumers. You are the reason Bonne Maman is such a successful brand. Bonne Maman is owned by Andros SNC, a privately owned, family run company, situated in the southwest of France. Our ...


1

It could also possibly be because the modern varieties of grapes commercially grown for eating do not make a good jelly or jam. Having made jam with a variety of grapes I have found that most of the grapes we buy as table grapes make a fairly ordinary jam whereas if you can get hold of older cultivars, grape jam/jelly is an amazing preserve.


1

For what it is worth, in case you want to make your own grape jam. The recipe calls for basically four things: grapes, sugar, lemon, butter. And as I have gotten a lot of recipes off of SeriousEats.com, I figure this might be worth a look. Check it out here.


1

My mother and my wife have been making jams for a total of about 90 years. Based on what I have seen, I think all jams made with either hot bath or open kettle method oxidize a bit near the top of the jar. Lighter coloured jams, such as peach, show it more obviously. The taste is generally unaffected. We have always eaten these and never had any problems. I ...


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