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61

What about a piping bag? Fill the bag with a spatula, pipe into the bottle.


13

Edited: Concerns were expressed about such items being suited for food use. I've added comments in the text on "Food Grade" items plus a note at the end. How can I get a very thick or viscous paste (e.g. caramel, ganache, thick mayonnaise) into small-necked squeeze bottles without heating it up? Consider using a "grease gun" as used by mechanics. These ...


12

The important part of the system are the lids. The ideal lids are the Mason-type (no matter which company produced them), with a flat top and a separate side piece with thread. Another type that works is the older Weck style jar, which consists of a glass jar with glass lid, plus rubber steal and metal clamps, no threads. This system is as safe as the ...


10

There are thick food grade syringes being made for that kind of application.. https://www.amazon.com/Syringes/dp/B07C71C1LH/ The plunger comes out at the back easily, so you can pour your sauce into the syringe, and then inject it into your dispensing bottle.


6

TL;DR: likely because demand was too low to sustain commercial distribution Barring any relationship to a specific historical incident, it's very difficult to find out why a specific food is no longer commercially produced. In the absence of specific reasons, we can see a number of contributing factors as to why grape preserves would have gone off the ...


5

A wierd idea - if you squeeze the bottle, put its neck into the paste while squzeed and then let go, it will suck up the food inside? :o


5

Similar to the other suggestions, you can use a large mouth water bottle, sports drink bottle, or restaurant style condiment bottle as a syringe. I've used a large mouth funnel into one of these with dry ingredients, then put the lid/cap back on to use as a squirt bottle. If the bottle doesn't already have an opening, you can make one with a drill or knife. ...


4

For home pressure canning, you should always use a Mason jar (Ball is one brand, but there are others). A "Mason jar" is the kind with the two-piece lid. When using home equipment, the two-piece lid is important because it will seal properly inside the pressure vessel. If you use a jar with a one-piece lid, such as in your photo, the lid tightness needs to ...


4

The conservation issue aside: It depends heavily on what fruits you want to use. Fruits that contain a lot of fiber might not need any thickening agent to get a good, spreadable consistency. This includes for example certain variants of apples or pears, but also things like plums if you don't discard the skins. The consistency may be a bit different from ...


3

Well, if you're trying to minimize sugar overall, really the only substitute is low-sugar pectin. You can use grape sugar, or high fructose corn syrup, or other non-sugarcane-derived sugars, but unless you use low-sugar pectin you have to use some kind of sugar or the jam won't thicken properly.


3

Only recipes from trusted sources should be used for shelf stable canning, as they are proven to produce a product with a sufficiently low pH to be safe when stored at room temperature. The boiling water bath process is a way to create a vacuum seal, it is also a way to get the contents of the jar to near boiling for a certain amount of time, this will kill ...


3

For strawberry jam, the discoloration that happens over time is when the pelargonidin, i.e. the red color breaks down, leaving you with a brownish-red or greyish mush instead of a vibrant red jam. The breaking down is sped up by a warm environment and exposure to light, starting with long cooking time (probably not an issue in your case), and continuing in ...


2

I have a method, which I have used on salad dressing bottles in the past. Take a bamboo kebab skewer (needs to be wooden, not steel, for the texture). Put a funnel in the bottle's neck. Pour in the thick liquid. Put the skewer through the liquid and funnel hole to the bottom of the bottle, or as close as you can get. Move the skewer up and down. The liquid ...


2

Most commercial pint- and quart-size mayonnaise or salad dressing jars may be used with new two-piece lids for canning acid foods. However, you should expect more seal failures and jar breakage. These jars have a narrower sealing surface and are tempered less than Mason jars, and may be weakened by repeated contact with metal spoons or knives used in ...


2

One thing to remember with food safety is that questions like "is my food safe/contaminated/edible" can't be answered with a simple yes/no. There's no way to be certain if eating a given food will without question make you sick; even if you were to sample and test for bacteria and toxins, you could simply have missed a contaminated portion, or there might ...


2

I received the following response from Bonne Maman in France Dear Mr. XXX, Thank you for contacting Bonne Maman®. We are always happy to hear from our consumers. You are the reason Bonne Maman is such a successful brand. Bonne Maman is owned by Andros SNC, a privately owned, family run company, situated in the southwest of France. Our ...


2

It could also possibly be because the modern varieties of grapes commercially grown for eating do not make a good jelly or jam. Having made jam with a variety of grapes I have found that most of the grapes we buy as table grapes make a fairly ordinary jam whereas if you can get hold of older cultivars, grape jam/jelly is an amazing preserve.


1

For what it is worth, in case you want to make your own grape jam. The recipe calls for basically four things: grapes, sugar, lemon, butter. And as I have gotten a lot of recipes off of SeriousEats.com, I figure this might be worth a look. Check it out here.


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