65

Clean your hands before you eat. Often, you will be given a hot towel for the purpose. Return the towel to the server neatly folded. It is fine to eat sushi with your hand, as long as there is rice with each piece of fish. Sashimi (sliced fish not prepared with rice) should only be eaten with chopsticks. If you sit at the sushi bar, feel free to converse ...


38

They may have been trying to describe "salt and Japanese pepper". Japanese pepper is unrelated to black pepper, but closely related to Sichuan pepper; its flavor has been described as "lemony" and it has a "numbing" quality. It's also known as "sansho". Mixtures of pre-ground sansho and salt are readily available in Asian grocery stores. This mixture is ...


21

Yes, those spots are normal, they form as the nattou ages. They are amino acid crystals, and they are perfectly safe. Here's a picture. They're a bit crunchy, which you may or may not like. If you don't like the dots, get young nattou and consume it before the crystals form. If you do like them, get more mature nattou. With younger nattou, you should be ...


18

That item in the bottom right is Tamago nigiri, a slice of omelette on top of seasoned rice.


18

Olive oil is not native to Japan and is never used in traditional Japanese cooking. (Yes, olives are now grown in Japan and olive oil is readily available, but so are burgers and pizza.) Your recipe's "vegetable oil" is almost certainly a translation of the Japanese サラダ油 sarada abura, literally "salad oil", meaning any of a number of mildly flavored, ...


16

It sounds like you were served sushi rolls as finger food, and if chopsticks are not provided, then you are expected to eat it like the other finger food, with your fingers. There isn't really etiquette involved as this isn't a restaurant setting. If you are having a sit-down meal, and there are no chopsticks provided, you could always ask for a pair. ...


16

An info-graphic I found on the topic a little while ago that I believe answers your question quite well: Source: iLoveCoffee.JP In terms of etiquette is it alright to eat sushi by hand? If relevant I'm in North America. According to the info-graphic there is no wrong way to eat sushi as long as it makes it into your belly. I would agree with this ...


16

I think it's called furikake. Per Wikipedia: Furikake is a dry Japanese seasoning meant to be sprinkled on top of cooked rice, vegetables, and fish. It typically consists of a mixture of dried fish, sesame seeds, chopped seaweed, sugar, salt, and monosodium glutamate.


15

According to an article about Fugu at Maldova Welcome: Some people who’ve tried puffer dishes describe it as one of the most sublime flavors in the world. Others, apparently less enthusiastic, or simply more objective, describe fugu meat as a cross between crunchy and chewy, said by the Japanese to go “shiko-shiko” in one’s mouth when absolutely ...


15

You can do this with an air pump, egg white powder and xanthan gum :) http://www.molecularrecipes.com/culinary-foams-class/bubbles-air-pump/ The “bubbles with air pump” technique consists of injecting air using a fish tank air pump into a liquid with some viscosity. It works great with light syrups and juices by just adding a little egg white powder and ...


12

Welcome. According to the excerpt below from this page , kidney beans are an acceptable substitute. azuki bean = adzuki bean = Tiensin red bean = aduki bean = asuki bean = field pea = red Oriental bean = feijao bean = red chori Equivalents: 1 cup dried yields 3 cups cooked beans Pronunciation: a-ZOO-kee Notes: The Japanese use these small red ...


12

AFAIK, meat is not really used for Tempura. Do vegetables. (I assume you already do that). If you want to do fried battered meats, I would suggest cutting them as small as possible. Cut the meat into thin strips. You could also use cheese, look for grilling cheese like Halloumi.


11

Seitan texture troubleshooting Spongy when simmered The classic Seitan problem- make a dough and boil it, anyone can do that right? Not with Seitan- either you get it just right or it's inedible. Here's two tricks. use a container The surefire way to avoid watery Seitan is to constrain it in some way- commonly used methods are aluminum foil, a freezable/...


11

It will produce the same effect, however it might alter the taste (depending on the type of beer), and will almost certainly alter the color of the final product, as beer contains sugars that will increase browning.


10

Soy sauce, sake or mirin and sugar are the usual ingredients in a teriyaki sauce. The rice wines in particular are vital for an authentic teriyaki flavour. So the question is somewhat moot: onions aren't usually found in teriyaki sauce anyway. The onions naturally add flavour to your marinade: if you like it, leave them in, if you don't, take them out. The ...


10

The ingredient is Mizuame (水飴), a Japanese sweetener. It adds sweetness and gives a luster. When they need large amount, professional cooks usually scoops it with their bare hands, as she does in the movie. I'm not sure of the reason, but Mizuame is very sticky and it is troublesome to handle with tools. And this behavior explains that she has long ...


10

This appears to be a Japanese pickle mixture, made with daikon radish amount other things, called Furkujinzuke. Fukujinzuke is a mixture of Japanese radish (daikon), lotus root, cucumber and eggplant which are preserved in a soya sauce and sweet cooking wine (mirin) base. The sweet brown or red relish is served as a garnish to Japanese curry (kare raisu)....


10

The one I use is Aji-Shio-Kosho. It is a blend of salt, black pepper, and MSG. Here is a link to the specific one I buy on Amazon. A quick internet search may provide you with more results.


9

I've eaten a few of these before and while it sounds like furikake to someone who hasn't had them, I don't think that's what you're looking for in this case. Furikake is primarily used for seasoning white rice to be eaten otherwise plain, but I'm almost sure you're looking for something like this: (from http://jpninfo.com/22660) I don't think there's a ...


9

There are olive oils that are produced in Japan and used in Japanese cuisine. It just depends on the flavors you are trying to achieve in a recipe. Sesame oil has a very strong, distinctive flavor. Olive oil can as well, but it is clearly different. It is certainly possible that flavors would be masked or changed, but if that is all you have... This ...


8

There are many different kinds of "an" paste. Left unspecified, the generic type is "red beans", specifically azuki. I've found it pretty easy to find azuki beans in Germany, the US, Japan and Korea, so I can't imagine it being terribly hard anywhere else; in the US and Germany it was often sold by natural foods shops when there wasn't an Asian market nearby....


8

Natto shouldn't be salty by itself, because salt kills the culture that grows on the soybeans. Salted soybeans are fermented into miso; unsalted ones become natto. Normally, you'd season the natto with some combination of strong Japanese-style mustard, soy sauce, scallions or Japanese leeks, and maybe grated nagaimo if you want an even more mucilaginous ...


8

It's called an "omelet", but it's scrambled eggs, well formed into an omelet shape Cook scrambled eggs, and just before they set (20 ish seconds) fold them, and tip the pan to roll them in the curve of the pan to form the classic omelet shape and serve. Since the eggs are not yet fully set, the outer surface will form a smooth omelet appearance You need a ...


8

The Chinese cultural norm is to eat rice with chopsticks. It would be very inconvenient to constantly switch back and forth between eating with chopsticks and a spoon depending upon whether you were eating rice or vegetables or meat. To get around the loose grain problem, you can use the shovel method. You pick up your bowl and use a shoveling motion with ...


7

Since dashi is, after all, made with seaweed and dried fish, it will smell and taste a bit of the sea. If you don't eat or prepare much seafood, this smell might seem quite strong to you; for people, like most Japanese people, who eat fresh seafood five times a week, the smell and taste are subtle. The other possibility is that you made an error in ...


7

Food.com actually provides a recipe for making it, saying: Yushi doufu is tofu that has not been pressed and formed, but simply scooped out after tofu coagulates... The ingredients are soy beans, water, and nigari.


7

The nori that you buy as sheets is usually a different species than that of the form prepared as aonori. The form that you buy in sheets is, additionally, typically roasted, which changes the flavor. Aonori is usually of the genus Monostroma or Enteromorpha. Toasted nori for sushi is usually of the genus Porphyra. Because of those two details, I don't ...


7

No, azuki beans are very different in texture and flavor from kidney beans, you won't be able to use them as a substitute.


7

Actual traditional japanese knives are even less "all purpose" than european style knives. The knives referred to in the question are not japanese but chinese in style. They are commonly manufactured, though, by both the chinese and japanese makers. The japanese call a japanese-made chinese style knife a chukabocho (chuka means "chinese style cuisine", a ...


7

Mochi is a sticky rice cake that can be served both sweet and savory. Sweetened rice pudding is not an uncommon dessert in Japanese cuisine. I think your original premise, that sweetened rice is unacceptable in Japanese cuisine is flawed. Rice is a staple in Japanese cuisine, and is used in numerous ways. Sweet preparations are certainly common. Perhaps ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible