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12

Fruits that are high in pectin are not necessarily sour and sour fruits are not necessarily high in pectin. However, pectin is typically found in high concentrations in firm fleshed fruit such as apples and in the skins of citrus. Unripe fruit has even more than the ripe. So- I can see why you would come to that conclusion. It is easy enough to find charts ...


8

Yes, though to be clear, you unseal, empty the jars into a pot, heat & add sugar, (while re-cleaning/sterilizing the jars) then fill the hot jars and process. You don't just add sugar to the jars. To suit the food safety fanatics, use new lids. I, personally, figure that if I use old lids and they seal, it's fine, because it sealed, and I know that ...


6

Yes, you can. In fact, many canning and jarring recipes specifically call for citric acid. Presumably you are using citric acid in its dried, crystalline form. In that case, a solution of around 4% citric acid (e.g. 4gm in 100ml of water) should be around the same strength as lemon juice.


6

I haven't made jam in years and don't know first-hand, but this website suggests it won't scale as the jam won't cook as well. This seems predicated on the idea that your cooking vessel remains the same size but the batch is larger. From the linked site: Most jam recipes already call for you to use the widest pot you have, for maximum surface area. ...


5

It's not working because you're trying to set jello to lukewarm water - from mixing the hot and cold and then adding the jello. The hot water needs to be added first, then the jello, then the cold water, then refrigerate, in that order.


5

Commercial peanut butter is shelf stable for several months in your pantry, however it is not acidic enough for home canning. When you remove most of the air in home canned goods you are actually setting up a good environment for botulism to grow. Botulism can’t thrive in an acidic conditions, that is why a low ph is essential for safe home canning.


5

TL;DR: likely because demand was too low to sustain commercial distribution Barring any relationship to a specific historical incident, it's very difficult to find out why a specific food is no longer commercially produced. In the absence of specific reasons, we can see a number of contributing factors as to why grape preserves would have gone off the ...


4

The answer is mostly just "it's tradition", as with most questions like this. I do think the pattern you've described isn't quite the actual one. What really happens is that we tend to eat peanut butter and jelly on sandwiches, and put one or the other on single slices of bread, because with a sandwich you can spread one thing on each half and put them ...


4

I buy bulk pure Stevioside powder online. It's much cheaper to buy the pure powder that way and make your own stock solution. I make my stock strong enough so that 1 drop equals 1 teaspoon (4g) sugar in sweetness, 3 drops per tablespoon (12g). For 100 ml: 23.5 gram Stevia powder 20 ml 95% ethanol Bring to 100 ml with water. The alcohol is added both ...


4

Fruit preserves have a lot going on. They have a lot of sugar and pectin and sometimes fiber from the fruit. They have already been boiled for a while and the fruit flavors that are left are there to stay. Liquid flavorings are mostly alcohol with volatile flavoring compounds. They are added late to a recipe because they boil off easily- at a lower ...


4

After some reading: are you sure your water-temperature is not tool cold at the start? This page says the following about gelatin: But gelatin proteins don’t readily form bonds with one another. Heat causes them to initially unravel and disperse just like any protein. They never form new bonds, though, so the liquid in which they’re dispersed stays fluid....


4

Apricots (Prunus armeniaca and peaches (Prunus persica) are botanically speaking “close cousins” and have a quite similar flavor profile. Fresh apricot tends to be both sweeter and tarter, peach is a bit milder overall. The difference is less pronounced with preserves. For your sauce, apricot alone (i.e. using more apricot to get the same amount as the ...


3

Your requirements are so specific that I would say: don't search for some existing product which has it all, just engineer your own. The simplest would be to take some base which is transparent and does not have a strong color in itself and whose sweetness can be varied. For example, make your own elderflower syrup with whatever proportion of elderflower ...


3

I found a site with another cranberry sauce maker complaining of the end product being too runny. What I learned is that cranberries have lots of natural pectin that is released when they are cooked past bursting. If it were me, I would: cook it some more, keeping it at a boil but watching it carefully so it doesn't boil over and does not start to ...


3

This link http://www.livestrong.com/article/520416-how-to-substitute-lemon-juice-for-citric-acid/ says 1/4 teaspoon of citric acid substitutes 1 tablespoon of lemon juice. So for half a cup of lemon juice, use two teaspoons of citric acid, and compensate for the missing liquid.


3

I made apricot/jalapeno jam in August, and I had directions from an experienced jam maker. She said, after it starts to jell, remove the pan from heat, let it set a minute, then thoroughly stir before putting the jam into your jars for processing. Then the fruit doesn't float to the top. It worked quite well. I used liquid pectin for that batch, too, don't ...


3

Correct Procedure for Jello: Heat water (boil) Dissolve the Jello powder in the heated water Add cold water Refrigerate to set from http://www.molecularrecipes.com Temperature (gels and melts): Will hydrate at 50°C/122°F, but it's pretty standard to just boil it. Sets at 15°C/60°F, but sets much faster chilled, around 1°C/34°F. Melts between 25°C-...


2

I use nylon straining bags for making wine. You can get them in various sizes at homebrew stores. (for example: http://www.midwestsupplies.com/nylon-straining-bag-18-x-32-coarse-mesh.html) I'm sure they'd do the trick for what you need. Although this may only work for passing juice, you might inquire at your local homebrew store if they have a slightly ...


2

All gelling agents work only under certain conditions. You need to be in the working range for: temperature sugar content pH alcohol Pectins are more sensitive than gelatine, working in narrower ranges. Also, not every pectin is active in the same range, the main difference is between HM and LM pectin. You can try if gelatine works with your recipe, ...


2

It seems likely that there was some form of residue left behind in the container; whether this was actual soap or just the scent is difficult to determine. I have found that soap scents do tend to cling a bit more stubbornly to plastic than they do to other materials, but that's just my experience. Next time you might try rinsing the container and drying ...


2

In terms of killing pathogens, it is a belt and suspenders thing. The additional processing ensures that any pathogens that entered the jars while you were filling them are killed. More importantly, as Jefromi has reminded us, the additional boiling with the assembled and lidded jars causes the header air to heat up, expanding in volume and raising the ...


2

The amount of sugar in this recipe looks a bit low for a 10 minute simmer. I estimate that the bulk of the ingredients consists of, ~200g sugar ~330g cranberries ~330g bell pepper That's less than 25% sugar. If this were a straight cranberry jelly, you'd need about 40% sugar content for optimal jelly strength and, I estimate, at least 35%. I think that ...


2

Sounds to me like a pineapple jelly would do the trick for you. It stays vibrant yellow, and a jelly instead of a jam would be clear with no floating pieces or chunks. Pineapple is a fairly unusual jelly/jam flavor, but quite good. It makes an interesting but delicious pb&j, and could probably be substituted pretty much anywhere you would use jelly ...


2

With gelatin on the glossy, bouncy, and stretchy end, and agar sort of on the opposite... perhaps OP can try konnyaku, a starch developed by the Japanese and currently much used in their (& Chinese & Korean) snack products... It's from a root plant, and behaves somewhere inbetween the gelatin and agar... Glossy and bouncy like the former (stretches ...


2

I've used agar agar before with this recipe. Although I've never tried it myself with coffee beans, the trick might be to use instant coffee, which is what I find is almost the case with other desserts with coffee flavor. I also add 1 teaspoon of vanilla essence right at the end, which lifts the flavor and also sieve before letting it set. I generally put it ...


2

Jams and jellies most commonly use pectin, not gelatin. But in either case, the purpose is to make it set, i.e. gel up. It's just about texture, not preservation. Without that you'd have a thick liquid, not really much good for spreading on things. The main ingredient that contributes to safety of canned jam and jelly are is acid: the natural acidity of the ...


2

Okay, so I think the obvious answer is dandelion jelly. Yes, that is a thing that exists. You could probably safely add some other edible, yellow flowers (like chrysanthemums, maybe? or even some oolong tea?) and almost certainly cut back on the sugar, but that's a little more risky and will require some experimentation. I have added gelatin to my jellies ...


2

Apple jelly with either food coloring or turmeric in it. Not sure if you can just mix stuff into a jar of already made jelly, and keep its nice original texture, but you can make the jelly from apple juice (many recipes available on internet, e.g.: http://www.cooks.com/recipe/x16tm5jm/apple-jelly-from-apple-juice.html) Turmeric has such a strong color, ...


1

I've seen a yellow garlic-lemon sauce... it was very good, and I put it on many sandwiches, though the color was not quite what you want. I don't have a recipe (it was commercially made) but perhaps you can develop something of the sort, tweaked for the appearance you want. The garlic lemon sauce I mentioned was opaque and pale, possibly mayonnaise based. ...


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