Hot answers tagged

16

Some quick research indicates there are enzymes in freshly-squeezed juice that will degrade it fairly rapidly, and that they can be deactivated by heat. Of course, that also changes the flavor (especially since you're not going to be able to quickly heat and cool it, as it apparently only takes 30 seconds, but any method doable in a home kitchen will keep it ...


14

Fruit contains lots of water. When you take a piece of fruit at home and press it, you end up with sugars, vitamins and other solids dissolved in water. Let's assume that 100 g of just-pressed juice has X g of water and 100-X g of juice. A manufacturer who sells juice can do several things. pasteurize the juice and sell it as-is. This is 100% juice, not ...


13

What they mean is that they took some grape juice and concentrated it by evaporating some of the water contained in it (a concentrate is juice in which the sugar content is increased at least of 50%). This is good for producers because concentrated juice has a lower volume, is easier/cheaper to stock/transport etc. When they bottle the juice, they then ...


10

Apple juice will give you very little additional taste, but it will sweeten your smoothie. Especially filtered apple juice has a rather subtle flavor which is easily covered by other fruit flavors. Juice producers use this to make their juices cheaper - if a juice advertises 100% fruit, and a flavor from an expensive, non-juicy fruit like strawberries, it is ...


9

As I am from "Apfelschorle Country", I have to chime in. Note that some statements below are subjective to a certain degree. For me, a real Apfelschorle is apple juice and carbonated water, poured into one glass at roughly a 1:1 ratio (or a bit more juice), not stirred. Bottled Apfelschorle is in my very personal opinion not the real deal - that's a ...


8

You can neutralize the acidity of your drink by adding a half teaspoon of baking soda, but don't do this. Apart from fizzing up like a volcano, your lemon drink, or what is left of it, will taste pretty awful. What you want to do is reduce the perceived acidity. This can be done simply by adding more honey. I suggest adding a teaspoon at a time until it ...


8

Some fruit juices can be heated to drive off excess water (especially those with a higher sugar content) but citrus doesn't tolerate this well. Fresh-squeezed citrus will get bitter and acrid if reduced. Instead, squeeze your citrus as normal and freeze the juice in an open container. Once it's set into a solid block, place it into a funnel or strainer ...


8

I'd be very wary of this, if only because it seems to have fermented remarkably quickly. The fizz is likely the result of carbon dioxide being produced by yeast eating the sugars in the grape juice; this is the same process that carbonates beer or sparkling wines. The thing is, most of these yeasts are introduced deliberately, and they take a while to do ...


7

The peel is certainly edible, it's up to you whether you use it or not. If you choose to not peel them, try using large, juicy guavas. The seeds are edible as well, but perhaps a bit annoying in juice. So perhaps you could put it through a sieve after it's juiced (when using a juicer). If you don't find them annoying, there is no problem in leaving them in. ...


7

No, you cannot substitute fresh apple juice. Some of the compounds found in apple juice are very volatile. They evaporate a few minutes after the juice is made, or are broken down by still-active enzymes or oxygenation. These processes don't happen in the whole apple, because these compounds don't come into contact with the wrong enzymes or oxygen before ...


7

If your physician recommended the fresh apple juice specifically (and not, for example, bottled apple juice or eating apples, or just eating more fruit), you should ask him or her what the reasons for that recommendation are, and what reasonable alternatives you can use if you are finding it difficult to comply with the recommendation. Fresh apple juice is ...


7

You say you are substituting the juices for milk. You have to ask yourself, what roles does milk play in the recipe, and how well will the juices in question fill those roles? What does milk contribute? The milk adds: Liquid, to gelatinize the starch in the flour to create the structure of the cake; the water will also contribute to some gluten formation,...


7

Short of using an electric juicer, the squeeze press type of juicer is very popular for doing large quantities of citrus quickly and efficiently. They are both fast, and squeeze almost all of the available juice, getting the best of both worlds. These come in sizes that are best for limes, lemons, oranges, or even grapefruits.


6

For making large amounts of margarita, I've found it hard to beat a press like this one: It extracts almost all the juice in one easy movement. I don't see the benefit in a rotary juicer.


6

Apple cider has two meanings, but they both start with raw, pressed juice from crushed apples. Soft apple cider (normally just called cider) is simply the pressed juice, bottled. It is cloudy from suspended apple particles, and turns brown from the oxidation, much as apples themselves do when cut and exposed to air. Hard apple cider is an alcoholic ...


6

Yes, you can squeeze citrus too much. That bitterness you sometimes taste in citrus fruit comes from limonin, a compound that most people can detect at concentrations as small as a few parts per million. In many citrus fruits the limonin is created once the acids of the juice vesicles interact with LARL, a tasteless substance in the fruit's tissues (...


6

Lemonade is of course all about balancing the sweet and the sour. It stands to reason that if you're trying to amp up the sweetness, you can either add more sugar (the opposite of the goal here) or reduce its opposite, the sour. Reducing both sugar and the acid is equivalent to diluting your lemonade, so one of the first things you could try is simply ...


6

This is classic enzymatic-oxidation browning. Two main culprits - oxygen and a group of enzymes (polyphenoloxidases) that promotes a reaction between oxygen and polyphenolic compounds in the juice. The juicing action will inevitably end up stirring into the liquid a lot of air which will end up dissolved in it. Air has 21% oxygen in it. Solubility of gases ...


6

You are comparing two rather different things. A mixture of apple juice and water that is then carbonated (as your bottled product would be) is quite different from a mixture of still apple juice and carbonated water. I know that both alcoholic and non-alcoholic carbonated cider/apple juice typically have small bubbles. And you can purchase carbonated apple ...


6

Theoretically, you could use a wine, apple, or or other heavy-duty fruit press to press 10-20lbs of citrus at a time. But you wouldn't want to. Both the peels of the citrus and the seeds contain bitter and/or intensely acidic compounds (those essential oils WS talks about in the comments). If you press citrus in any press that uses pressure on the whole ...


5

I have the brand of juicer (Champion) mentioned by the OP in comments. It's a rather unusual design that isn't used by most other companies. They are somewhat notorious for producing a lot of foam. I bought it perhaps 15 years ago, but rarely use it for this reason. (It still has other uses other than juicing.) Anyhow, the solution I found to this ...


5

Visible cloudiness is a result of suspended particles of about 1 micrometer (micron) or larger in size. Technically, just about any juice could in theory be filtered to remove those particles. But there are a couple things going on here. First, any filtering, clarification, etc. does cause some modification of flavor. Flavor compounds can be much smaller ...


5

You can buy fennel seed extract, but I can't find instructions to make it. I assume you could just crush the seeds, put them in vodka and strain in a week or two. If you don't want to use alcohol, you could also use propylene glycol or glycerine. Another thing you might consider is using vinegar the same way. That could certainly be an interesting accent ...


5

Examining a commercial version (a not HFCS commercial version, for a wonder) it's mostly water, "27% cranberry juice", sugar, and "flavors." So if you have 100% juice, you'll probably have something the consistency of a syrup by the time you have enough sugar to make it sweet. The widespread solution is to dilute with water - thus, "cranberry juice cocktail"...


5

Just because industrial food producers can create a safe process for a given preservation method, it does not mean that you can do it too. The best you can do in this case is to make canned juice, which, as long as it is in a closed jar or bottle, will last on the shelf for months and years. But as soon as you open it, you will only have 3-5 days in the ...


4

You neutralize acid by adding a base. Generally bases are bitter tasting. Black tea is a base, as is baking soda (sodium bicarbonate). The problem is that when you add an acid to a base you get salts. What we call salt is NaCL, which is just one example of a salt, there are many others, and those salts can add all sorts of undesirable flavor combinations. So ...


4

I haven't tried this, but in theory, it can work: Try adding a couple of tablespoons of flaxseed oil, coconut oil (or any other healthy oil you'd drink) to the froth jar and swish around. It'll likely destabilize the foam. Additional Info: Foams are similar to emulsions and are usually caused by proteins. Many industrial processes use surfactants to ...


4

While the pith of citrus fruits can be very bitter, there is no juice in it. To extract any liquid from pith would require much more pressure than any squeezing-based juicing equipment at a bar is likely to generate. A centrifugal juicer is more likely to produce a bitter flavor if the pith is included with the fruit, as small bits of pith will end up in the ...


4

Still Tasty is making the assumption that you are freezing the juice AFTER opening it, not freezing the unopened cans. The heading of the info says "Sold in Unopened Cans", as it goes on in the text about freezing, it says, "Freeze in airtight glass or plastic container and leave at least 1/2 inch of headspace at the top, as juice will expand when frozen." ...


4

According to this government website from Canada, the date on your product should be read as 15th of December of 2014. http://www.inspection.gc.ca/food/information-for-consumers/fact-sheets/date-labelling/eng/1332357469487/1332357545633


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible