Hot answers tagged

16

Heavier limes tend to be more juicy, but another important factor is the color and texture of the skin. Look for the brightest green (sometimes with almost a yellow tinge) and smoothest skin you can find. Many bumps or shriveled looking areas are good indications that there will be less juice. If that's all that's available in your store, though, just get ...


9

The three types of appliances you have listed have different primary uses, and best purposes, although they have some overlap in their capabilities. Blenders. Good at, well, blending: making smoothies, pureeing soup, grinding nuts to butter, and at the high end, making frozen ice drinks. By far the best device for this purpose, but not very versatile. ...


8

If you microwave bananas for a few minutes in a bowl covered with plastic wrap and then dump everything into fine mesh strainer to sit for about 15 minutes, you will get a bunch of juice out. Freezing the bananas before microwaving them works even better. This technique was used in a (really good) banana bread recipe from Cooks Illustrated several years ...


8

The most tell-tale factor I have found -- and this applies to lemons and oranges too -- is the thickness of the pith. When there's a half inch of that bitter white stuff, the pulp which contains all the juice is necessarily reduced in size. This seems to vary seasonally. It is most easily tested by rolling the fruit on a table under your palm, with gentle ...


8

Cold pressing is as the name implies, to press(instead of blending) juice from a fruit while minimizing heat generation. You can buy these cold pressing juicers from the market as they're quite common nowadays. Cold pressers from the market will likely have a rotating core (think drill bit) fixed in a tube structure. Drop your fruit from the top, and juice ...


7

It makes the lemon easier to squeeze. I think it has the most effect on the peel; it's softer and more flexible when warm, so you're able to get more juice out of it than you could otherwise if you're juicing by hand. That's especially true if you're trying to juice several lemons - you'll just get tired and stop being as thorough if it's harder. It ...


7

No, you cannot substitute fresh apple juice. Some of the compounds found in apple juice are very volatile. They evaporate a few minutes after the juice is made, or are broken down by still-active enzymes or oxygenation. These processes don't happen in the whole apple, because these compounds don't come into contact with the wrong enzymes or oxygen before ...


7

If your physician recommended the fresh apple juice specifically (and not, for example, bottled apple juice or eating apples, or just eating more fruit), you should ask him or her what the reasons for that recommendation are, and what reasonable alternatives you can use if you are finding it difficult to comply with the recommendation. Fresh apple juice is ...


7

Short of using an electric juicer, the squeeze press type of juicer is very popular for doing large quantities of citrus quickly and efficiently. They are both fast, and squeeze almost all of the available juice, getting the best of both worlds. These come in sizes that are best for limes, lemons, oranges, or even grapefruits.


7

The juiciest limes will generally be the heaviest ones. Water is dense, citrus peel and dry citrus are not so much.


6

For making large amounts of margarita, I've found it hard to beat a press like this one: It extracts almost all the juice in one easy movement. I don't see the benefit in a rotary juicer.


6

Theoretically, you could use a wine, apple, or or other heavy-duty fruit press to press 10-20lbs of citrus at a time. But you wouldn't want to. Both the peels of the citrus and the seeds contain bitter and/or intensely acidic compounds (those essential oils WS talks about in the comments). If you press citrus in any press that uses pressure on the whole ...


5

In my 900W microwave it takes 1/2 inch water 1 minute to boil and around 30 seconds to become hand-hot, (I know it may take a bit longer when heating a lemon with the skin acting like an insulator although this effect will be lessened due to the high oil content of the zest). You probably won't 'boil' the lemon however if you did it would produce by far the ...


5

I've made banana juice a number of times. And I'm referring to a relatively clear liquid extracted from the bananas. It's a pretty straightforward process that produces a high yield. The water in bananas is chemically bound to the starch in bananas and this liquid can be released by breaking down the starch using an enzyme called amylase that is present in ...


5

I have the brand of juicer (Champion) mentioned by the OP in comments. It's a rather unusual design that isn't used by most other companies. They are somewhat notorious for producing a lot of foam. I bought it perhaps 15 years ago, but rarely use it for this reason. (It still has other uses other than juicing.) Anyhow, the solution I found to this ...


5

I have owned both a citrus juicer, a masticating juicer, and a traditional centrifugal juicer, for a few years now. My feedback: Citrus juicer I have an industrial strength one (this one: http://www.israel-catalog.com/houseware/hadarit-zaksenberg-citrus-juice-squeezer). It's large and heavy, but it is sturdy, and withstands the weight of a "proper" pull ...


4

I haven't tried this, but in theory, it can work: Try adding a couple of tablespoons of flaxseed oil, coconut oil (or any other healthy oil you'd drink) to the froth jar and swish around. It'll likely destabilize the foam. Additional Info: Foams are similar to emulsions and are usually caused by proteins. Many industrial processes use surfactants to ...


4

The people of North West Tanzania and Southern Uganda have been making alcohol from banana juice for years. They blend ripe bananas with grass and mix with there feet or hands until the enzymes break down to get clear juice.


4

You may want to explain what you want to do with said juice, but since you tagged your question "cocktails", I am thinking that clarified juice might be good. One option (if you don't have a centrifuge, of course) would be to remove the pits, then gently blend (you may want to avoid heating too much in a powerful blender) with the enzyme, pectinase, ...


4

Passata still contains the pulp of the tomato, whereas juice is literally just the juice. So juice is thin like water whereas passata is thick like crushed tomatoes minus the seeds and skin. You probably wouldn't use tomato juice for making a marinara sauce.


3

I cannot think of any physical reason why this should be so, and I don't believe it Have you tried it? Buy two lemons, nuke one of them, and squeeze them both. Measure the juice that you get from each. Better, have someone else (who isn't aware that the lemons are different in any way) squeeze the lemons and tell you if they thought one was easier to ...


3

Some juicers are better than other kinds for different things. A dedicated wheat grass juicers probably isn't going to juice spinach, carrots, and kale well. A centrifugal juice usually doesn't handle wheatgrass well and in general isn't supposed to be as efficient as some other kinds for leafy greens. A single-gear or double-gear masticating juicer works ...


3

Hydraulic press juices such as the Norwalk first grind the produce into a pulp, then press the juice out of the pulp. The theory is that malic acid in green apple pulp can release more vitamins and minerals from the other vegetables and fruit. The hydraulic press action squeezes more juice out than other types of juicers. But you're looking at $2500 for a ...


3

Almost impossible to give a consistent apple, because even some of the most praised apples will vary radically by location and year to year. Do note though that many cider apples won't hurt you, but are generally not culinary apples as they are far too astringent. Even within cider apples there are three categories, sharp, bitter and sweet and the best ...


2

This depends on the type of juicer and how well it extracts the juice from the fruit. The best juicers leave a relatively flavourless pulp (which is, however, very high in fiber). If you're curious about the flavour, try tasting it! (I've heard of the pulp being used to make muffins, but other flavouring agents are definitely required). I am not sure about ...


2

With a masticating juicer, I've averaged 56% juice from unpeeled oranges (navel).


2

In some asian cuisine, you can sun dry the pulps (or remains) of fruits. Use the dry pulps to stir fry meat dish could be tasty because these pulps gives out fruity aroma to the meat and also absorb excess oil from the meat to balance out the dish ingredients.


2

We have a twin-screw masticating juicer (an older model Angel juicer) and although the seeds come out quite chewed up, I wouldn't want to drink them and we've never put the pulp back into the juice. One possibility that comes to mind is to cut the oranges, etc., into pieces and separate out the pieces that have seeds from those that don't. Run the seedless ...


2

hmm... I imagine that a method similar to getting liquid to make jellies could work for this. Freezing would break the cell walls and allow more liquid out, then you could blend it to a lovely mush and then put it into a jelly-bag or cheese-cloth and suspend it over a bowl in the fridge for a day or two and you should get some liquid out :)


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible