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15

Nobody is lying, different Doner meats have different fat contents, that's true of the ones in the stores as well as the ones in restaurants. Doner is a processed meat product made of ground meat and fat mixed with spices and usually preservatives. Sometimes fillers and binders are added as well. There's no rule saying a doner must have a specific amount of ...


9

Common sources of fat-soluble yellow colours are curcuma (curcumin as colorant, tends to give an almost fluorescent yellow), and chilli peppers (lycopene, tends more towards the orange in higher concentrations). But a lot of other carotene-containing items can give a yellow to orange colour (cumin among them, but it's less known as a colorant).


8

Easy! You want fairly broad, flat skewers, which will prevent the meat from rotating around the axis, like these: Quite appropriately, I've seen these referred to as "Persian-style" skewers. Not having a decent Middle Eastern grocery nearby, I instead use flattened bamboo skewers that I can find at my local Asian market, which look similar but smaller, ...


6

Fat doesn't just leave meat when it's cooked; plenty of it stays in the meat. Sure, some amount of water and fat comes out of meat during cooking. But it's by no means all, or even most of it! So there's nothing weird with cooking temperature or food safety going on here, and nothing special has to be done to keep that fat. It's just what happens when you ...


5

I strongly suspect that you are looking at a capsicum seed. In other words, you either had a piece of jalapeño, pickled pepperoni, or a sprinkle of pul biber (crushed red pepper). They are flat, about 2mm wide with that little tip. The “worm” is actually the embryonic part of the seed. There are a few edible seeds which seem to have a “worm”, e.g. this Q/A ...


4

For reference, a sheekh kebab is spiced minced meat pressed onto a skewer and barbecued. There are no binding agents like egg or breadcrumbs in a traditional recipe, so you want to avoid any extra moisture in your ingredients or it may not hold together. An authentic recipe will call for green chilies, not green peppers. The chilies need to be the your ...


4

There are no "secret ingredients" in making soft and juicy kebab. Much like sausage, meatballs, or meatloaf, this ground meat based food relies on salt, fat, and proper cooking to remain juicy. I recommend Chapter 5 of J. Kenji Lopez-Alt's The Food Lab for an explanation of how these elements interact (though I do not believe the book has a kebab recipe). ...


3

Absolutely! Metal skewers contribute to cooking the meat from the center as they pick up heat from the exposed parts and conduct it throughout. It is a good idea not to crowd your metal skewers with pieces of food to promote this. Not crowding the skewers also exposes more surface area for the food to caramelize. Doing this on a wooden skewer runs the ...


3

There is no way for us to give you absolute cooking times. There are too many variables, among them: How do you like your meat cooked? How hot is your fire? How far are the kabobs from the fire (since kabob cooking is essentially 100% radiation heating, distance is a huge factor) What is the size of your meat chunks? What is the starting temperature of your ...


3

Well I am Lebanese, and there is few small steps to make a good authentic Lebanese bread that looks like that: There is another type of bread called Saj Bread: Here is a video about it. Another type of bread is the tanour bread, where an indian tandour is used to make the bread. Well Lebanese and most of levant countries think that the tandour is their ...


3

In Melbourne, Australia, there are several types of flatbread termed Lebanese and one I know is stretchy-like. If you check out Australian chefs for recipes - Donna Hay, Greg Maloof and you'll need to check others online. If I find out what the brand is I'll put up another note.


2

Chelo (or Chellow) kebab refers to the entire dish which consists of the kebabs (usually 2), rice, and usually grilled tomatoes. Sometimes other accompaniments are included as well. The most common types of kebabs used for this dish are koobideh (ground beef) and barg (ground lamb). It is sometimes served with one of each. There are exceptions and, though ...


2

I see no acidic elements to your "marinade." Chili pepper (mentioned in the comments) is probably basic, rather than acidic. As written (and as commented on) it sounds more like a rub than a marinade. Both rubs and marinades impart flavor to the surface of proteins. Being acidic is not a requirement of a marinade.


2

Overworking the meat is generally what you want to avoid for a burger, but in the case of kebab meat it may help. It will give it a denser and bouncier texture. To do this, when mixing in the other ingredients, just mix for a bit longer than you normally would, especially with your hands as the heat will probably melt the fat slightly and help to bind it. ...


2

From things that goes into seekh kebbas that dye things yellow are: paprika cumin ginger bird's eye chilies (also garlic, and onions) Yellowish color is also strengthen by caramelization of sugars.


1

For meatballs, you can take 1/2 to 1/3 of the meat and process it in a food processor to make it almost gluey. Mix this with the flavourings/herbs and process again if you want the meat to homogenized or keep the herbs with the unprocessed part if you want chunky herbs. It also gives the meat a springier texture. You can achieve the same effect by working ...


1

What probably went wrong for the meat to turn hard is that it was overcooked and dried (which happens easily with chicken). Having said that, you could experiment with reducing temperature/time for better results. Also, a trick I use with chicken kebabs (but I grill them, so this might not work for frying) is that I cover them in yoghurt, which works as a ...


1

A traditional appropriate Persian skewer is flat and metal. Maybe butter on very cold skewers so when you "skewer" the meat the butters stays on the skewers. My other thought is- are you cooking enough? Meat releases when it is sufficiently cooked. Are you making the mixture? You may need more fat.


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