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7

I've been making kefir for about 2 years now and I've noticed a few things one of which is what you mentioned - kefir not thick and creamy. I've found when you use too many grains that's what happens. I make a pint (2 cups) so not as much as you but I only use two little pea sized grains. If they start to grow larger than that, the kefir starts to come out ...


6

No, you cannot. Kefir grains are a unique Symbiotic Culture of Bacteria and Yeast (SCOBY). Kefir grains are a gelatinous mass of microorganisms including Lactobacilli, Leuconostic, Acetobacter, and Saccharomyces. By looks, it is more like Ginger Beer Plant than sourdough starter. It is not possible to create kefir grains from scratch. You will have to buy a ...


6

There are different kinds of lactic acid fermentation which are done by different kinds of bacteria and/or yeasts. The simplistic picture is that yogurt is typically made with only two types of bacteria (lactobacillus bulgaricus and streptococcus thermophilus) that perform only homolactic fermentation converting sugar (glucose) into lactate only. In ...


5

In general, rinsing milk kefir grains is not recommended. Rinsing grains apparently washes off a layer of protective bacteria. An experiment showed that rinsing produced grains that were smaller, and kefir that was milder. I'm told that occasionally the grains build up orange fatty deposits that must be rinsed off, though I've never seen this so far. If ...


5

Most of the kefir recipes I saw online use whole milk, not low-fat milk as a starter. One source mentioned that commercial low-fat kefir recipes use large amounts of additives and stabilizers to make them thick. This might be related to your homemade kefir tasting watery, or being grainy, I don't know - but at least if you try and it doesn't solve the ...


4

The dynamics of the Grain growth are not currently well understood, much less its formation. Some researchers attempted to create grains in laboratory, but failed. There are over thirty or fourty strains of microbes in the kefir, and their ecological relationships are very complex. One could call the whole kefir culture an ecosystem of its own. The grains ...


4

During the freezing process, ice crystals can cause cell damage to microorganisms. This means that a lot of the bacteria in your kefir may have died in the freezing process, leaving your culture significantly weakened. It may take a few batches to get it back up to full strength.


4

The only safe thing to do is to throw it away. Preferably with a bottle or jar it is in, if you don't care for it. If you want to keep that jar, use dishwasher on it's hottest setting. I would also use sanitizers, but I have them readily available in my kitchen due to beer brewing. You can probably go without them. Seriously, mold is really hard to get rid ...


4

The damage is not so much as to the kefir but to the consumer of the kefir if it was made in a reactive metal. Kefir, being acidic, should not be in aluminum, brass, iron or copper as they react to acid. Stainless steel is preferred because it is inert to the milk kefir is made from. However, when first made stainless was unknown. Unless you have a real ...


4

Yes, you can refrigerate them for up to three weeks. Refrigeration slows down the fermentation without killing the culture. Three precautions: Use a jar with a tight lid. This will prevent cross-contamination with other flavors in the fridge. If you have other cultures there as well, such as yogurt, that's an additional reason for the tight lid. Use a ...


3

First off, not all kefir grains are alike. Maybe they're all descended from the same family tree long ago, but kefir grain activity will change significantly even in the same house from season to season (due to temperature and other environmental fluctuations), and depending on what you feed them (type of milk), and on the feeding schedule. So, in order to ...


3

From this comment on a passionate homemaking article, the commenter suggests that 2 Tbsp per quart of milk is an appropriate amount of kefir grains. In my personal experience, I've found that the amount is fairly variable, and that half to twice that suggested amount will produce kefir relatively quickly (how quickly, of course, changes with the amount ...


3

I have got a jar of kefir going that is made with whole milk powder. The grains seem to grow a lot faster then even with whole milk from the farmer. Try it, you don't have much to loose.


3

I have been making kefir for many years now. I always freeze grains using the dry milk powder mentioned above. Four days ago I cleaned our freezer of expired foods and found grains frozen 5 years ago. I was curious it they might be revived after so long since I've never left them for over one year. I rinsed them with tapwater (I admit to being abusive to my ...


3

If you'll drink it quickly, you can store it with an airtight lid, but this will make it "fizzy". Personally, I'd store it with a breathable lid to avoid carbonating it, and possibly causing it to explode. There's still live/active cultures, even when you remove the kefir grains. Edit: quickly, as in a day or so


3

If the taste is similar to yogurt, cheese, or sour milk as you describe then your kefir is likely good. On the other hand, if it seems moldy or rancid, it is bad. This site describes proper storage, shelf life and how to tell if it is bad. And this site describes kefir gone bad if "f there is noticeable fuzzy mold growing on it, if there are pink or ...


2

To freeze milk kefir grains, I place the unwashed grains in a pint glass bottle and fill the jar 3/4 full with fresh milk, put on the lid and place in the freezer compartment. To freeze water kefir grains, I do the same thing only I fill the jar 3/4 full with sugar water, (the same type as I use to make water kefir), put on the lid and place in the freezer....


2

Welcome! According to this site , you should refrigerate the kefir while draining and pressing. (See excerpt below.) While I can't find a specific reference to an exact PSI for the draining and pressing process, everything I read says to start with a plate on top and add more weight every few hours for the length of the process. Place the colander and ...


2

Your options are either to change the milk or cover the taste with any type of sweeteners like sugar honey cinnamon nutmeg. If you make smoothies you can add all types of fruit. Don't worry about the sugar intake as the kefir should be suppressing your candida.


2

Sounds like it "broke", as can happen with any dairy product. The protein in the kefir coagulated into the strings you are seeing. If you decide to try it again, try the highest fat kefir you can find, minimize acid in the dish, and incorporate the kefir at a relatively low temperature.


2

It probably won't work well, since you'll be missing the microorganisms that feed off milk sugars and what not. See this link for more details. Just buy some milk kefir grains rather than wasting milk. I'd guess that if you're starting with Lactaid, then water kefir grains may work better than they would in regular milk.


2

Since no one else answered, I'll give you what I can. Disclaimer: I never brewed with kefir grains. I brew beer, ciders, sometimes yogurt, and kefir started from commercial kefir. I'm a big fan of cinnamon. So what I tried: Filtration bags from brewers store simply fail to keep cinnamon dust in. Filtration bags, extra fine cinnamon dust and gunk glue them ...


2

The texture of kefir depends on many factors, so it's difficult to give a canonical answer. Based on the information you've provided, here are some possible reasons. I'm assuming you purchased the grains rather than got them from a neighbor, as in the latter case you could simply ask the neighbor for advice. So your grains are quite new. New grains need ...


2

I haven't made kefir myself, but this sounds very well explainable from a theoretical point of view. The reason why the milk in the kefir does not go bad is that the microorganisms in the kefir occupy the ecological niche which would normally be free for pathogens (and plain untasty bacteria) to invade. Obviously, you need a sufficient microorganism ...


2

in general, the process of fermentation is a conversion of sugars to alcohol and carbon dioxide. Lactose being a disaccharide composed of glucose and galactose is somewhat harder for the culture to digest, so as fermentation progresses the levels of all three sugars will fall but lactose will fall at a slower rate than galactose or glucose.


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The grains are really just a symbiotic colony of microscopic yeasts and bacteria that grow in and ferment milk into kefir, similar to the "SCOBY" that ferments kombucha, or the "mother" that ferments vinegar. The individual organisms are far too small to be harmed even by the intense action of a professional blender; if you managed to rescue some, then given ...


1

I've made kefir many times. When you first start using kefir grains, they take time to recover from not being in milk for a while (ie, if they were sent to you by courier or post) and to adjust to the conditions in your kitchen. It's normal for the first few batches of kefir to smell and taste like the milk went bad. Instead of going with fermenting the ...


1

To the person that wrote "I prepare Kefir with RAW milk, Boil it then cool it down, when temp reaches 22-24 C Put kefir grains in it (2 litre milk 5 tablespeen grains)" Why would you want to boil your raw milk before making kefir or for any reason? Heating the milk kills the enzymes and good bacteria and can alter the nutrient level also. I use 2-3 small ...


1

86 degrees Fahrenheit (with citric acid added before the heating process, if you want mozzarella/ricotta curds) or a culture added after this point (if using a culture give it 1 hour to start reacting and forming acids) rennet will need to be added in both cases. The temperature should be held at 72-77 degrees during the separation process. Humidity will not ...


1

With milk kefir, if you over-ferment it, you will see it break into at least two if not three layers. Slightly cloudy whey is one of them. Without that, you can strain out some grains, but getting a curd is going to be difficult. You can try acidifying the kefir with lemon juice or vinegar to coax out a curd, but it would be much easier if you let it over-...


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