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7

"High" gluten flour has, at most 15% gluten. "Indian" white flour, or maida has 7.5%. If you manage to pull it off, you basically end up with what's essentially a pan fried slab of mock meat, rather than a bread - basically seitan. You typically add gluten to flour to modify its characteristics - the only way you're going to be able to make naan that ...


4

No, I don't believe vital wheat gluten will work in this way for your recipe. When hydrated, vital wheat gluten is very sticky, and you can't roll or flatten it out very easily like you would need for naan -- and I'm not even sure it would cook and rise the same way as regular flour. There are gluten-free all-purpose flour that are made for baking. I would ...


4

I love Fathead dough!* No, don't microwave the egg. If the temp gets up to about 145°F, the proteins in an egg will solidify and you'll end up with bits of scrambled eggs smushed into the pizza crust. Unless that's your thing, I wouldn't microwave the egg. But...you are right. It can be hard to mix the cheese(s) and flour together and then to incorporate ...


3

First of all: you made me laugh because I misread the title as "Bitter Trump Fries"... :D Secondly: if they're too bitter, there are a few things you can do by soaking them overnight in the fridge with water with one of the following: a dash of honey (take warm tap water and let it cool down after you've added the honey) a dash of lemon (or better: lime) ...


3

You couldn't use only vital wheat gluten, as that would produce a rubbery mass, that would be too elastic to stretch out to a flat shape (and stay there). Though it can still be tasty, it wouldn't really resemble naan or any other flatbread. While I don't have an exact naan recipe, I do have a pizza recipe — which uses a large portion of Vital Wheat Gluten ...


2

Try this recipe⁠—I’ve played around and this works the best. Makes about 5 naans: 1/4 cup coconut flour 1 cup vital wheat gluten 2 Tbsp psyllium (or 1 tsp xanthan gum) 1 tsp baking powder pinch salt 1 Tbsp oil/ghee 1 cup warm water


2

The flour in this recipe is for thickening the sauce. You can use xanthan for this purpose, but in very small amounts...0.25 to 0.75% for a thin to medium running sauce. As you increase the amount, xanthan will make your sauce take on an unpleasant, mucous-like texture. This is most easily calculated in weight (and metric). I'll have a go, and convert it ...


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