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28

I wouldn't actually call a soup with thickened liquid "a stew", for me a stew is a cooked dish with very little liquid altogether, be it thick or thin. Because of this, I would suggest a very simple solution: pass your soup through a colander, catching the liquid. Then return as much liquid as you like to your vegetables, to get your stew. Keep the ...


28

Let's leave aside the question of what separates a soup from a stew (there's no real answer, only mostly arbitrary opinions - which seems to be a somewhat widely shared belief around here: https://cooking.stackexchange.com/a/20963/70120). It sounds to me like you have a dish with some liquid in it and you want to thicken it. There are a number of ways that ...


12

Your pan is getting too hot. Cast iron has a lot of" thermal mass", which means that it takes a good bit of energy (and time) to heat up, then it holds on to that heat and takes time to cool down. Most likely, your pan is still heating up when you cook your first pancake. It's at the right temperature, but still on the upswing and getting hotter. ...


9

Add a can of chickpeas to the soup/stew and include some of the liquid (Aquafaba) from the tin. The Aquafaba is an excellent thickener, even by itself.


7

"High" gluten flour has, at most 15% gluten. "Indian" white flour, or maida has 7.5%. If you manage to pull it off, you basically end up with what's essentially a pan fried slab of mock meat, rather than a bread - basically seitan. You typically add gluten to flour to modify its characteristics - the only way you're going to be able to ...


6

You can mix it with mashed potatoes or with mashed pumpkin or butternut. You can overcook rice to the point that it becomes a mushy paste and use that as a thickener. You can even take stale bread pulse it a couple of times in the blender and then add it. Pea protein is another option. Can of peas, drain the liquid, mash the peas, use as thickener.


5

Give the pan longer to heat initially, but use a lower flame. It sounds like the temperature is still evening out on the first one & has settled subsequently. Alternatively, do the first as you normally do, but drop the temperature before the second goes in. 'Medium' is not really an accurate description, & every stove & every pan is different.


4

Some other suggestions, appending the list given by Juhasz: Psyllum husks can be used as a thickener but they might not be easily available. They don't have any taste whatsoever. The upside is that they are mostly non-digestible fiber which should play nicely with your condition. The downside is that they have a slight laxative effect, so use with ...


4

There are literally keto stew recipes when you search keto stew on google. From Delish.com: When making keto stew: choose low carb vegetables replace potatoes with less starchy root vegetables use onions and garlic judiciously small amounts of colorful vegetables add visual appeal add the vegetables at the last 40-60 minutes of cook time Also, you can ...


4

I love Fathead dough!* No, don't microwave the egg. If the temp gets up to about 145°F, the proteins in an egg will solidify and you'll end up with bits of scrambled eggs smushed into the pizza crust. Unless that's your thing, I wouldn't microwave the egg. But...you are right. It can be hard to mix the cheese(s) and flour together and then to incorporate ...


4

No, I don't believe vital wheat gluten will work in this way for your recipe. When hydrated, vital wheat gluten is very sticky, and you can't roll or flatten it out very easily like you would need for naan -- and I'm not even sure it would cook and rise the same way as regular flour. There are gluten-free all-purpose flour that are made for baking. I would ...


3

The flour in this recipe is for thickening the sauce. You can use xanthan for this purpose, but in very small amounts...0.25 to 0.75% for a thin to medium running sauce. As you increase the amount, xanthan will make your sauce take on an unpleasant, mucous-like texture. This is most easily calculated in weight (and metric). I'll have a go, and convert it ...


3

First of all: you made me laugh because I misread the title as "Bitter Trump Fries"... :D Secondly: if they're too bitter, there are a few things you can do by soaking them overnight in the fridge with water with one of the following: a dash of honey (take warm tap water and let it cool down after you've added the honey) a dash of lemon (or better: lime) ...


3

You couldn't use only vital wheat gluten, as that would produce a rubbery mass, that would be too elastic to stretch out to a flat shape (and stay there). Though it can still be tasty, it wouldn't really resemble naan or any other flatbread. While I don't have an exact naan recipe, I do have a pizza recipe — which uses a large portion of Vital Wheat Gluten ...


3

To turn it into a stew I use a family recipe that starts out looking like soup: tomato juice, V8 juice, beef, carrots, celery, potatoes and let it cook. Near the end we add red wine and some tapioca beads. Not many beads or powder is needed and that brings it to a stew consistency in 15-30 minutes. Add some dumplings or rolls and done. I used to cook ...


2

Try this recipe⁠—I’ve played around and this works the best. Makes about 5 naans: 1/4 cup coconut flour 1 cup vital wheat gluten 2 Tbsp psyllium (or 1 tsp xanthan gum) 1 tsp baking powder pinch salt 1 Tbsp oil/ghee 1 cup warm water


2

Seeing that there is also a list of gluten-free flours that you may want to experiment with.Comments by the OP mentions auto-immune disease which to me means gluten intolerance. You do get some gluten free flours that can be used as thickening agents Almond Flour Almond flour is one of the most common grain- and gluten-free flours. It’s made from ground, ...


2

Adding to many other fine suggestions: Add (cooked, drained) beans or (cooked or dry) lentils. The small red lentils, in particular, do a great job of thickening a pot.


2

First off, "Keto King's" bread recipe is basically an (unchanged) ripoff of Diedra's Ultimate Keto Bread version 1.0. Since version 1.0, she developed a much improved Ultimate Keto Bread v2.0. I've made that recipe probably a hundred times and have also tried tweaking many of the ingredients in order to better understand their overall effect. I can ...


2

It seems that what you are trying to produce is a thin mayonnaise. So: Will it be possible to create the emulsion with just a spatula and a pot? No. You will have to really emulsify the stuff, preferably with something with a motor. Look into ways to make mayonnaise. However, that would probably be wasteful, especially because the acetic acid would ...


2

When I was low-carbing, I would use almond flour mixed with plenty of seasonings. I also used crushed up pork rinds that I would mix with freshly grated parmesan or the green container parmesan when fresh was not readily available.


2

One option is foregoing thickener entirely. I regularly make sauces with those proportions and no thickener and find them perfectly fine, texture wise. Another option is substituting the half and half with full cream or even switch 1/3-1/2 of it for cream cheese. Or, similarly, add more parmesan or another cheese to thicken the sauce. All of those ...


1

Egg yolk is a possible alternative. One or two per cup of liquid works for gravy, so I would suggest two to four in your recipe. An out of fashion thickener is blood (totally keto!). It once was commonly used. You may be able to find it in an Asian market near you. I haven't tried it, so can't suggest an amount.


1

Try powdered gelatin. Using these two recipes as reference (1, 2) I recommend you start with a tablespoon. In candy making, gelatin is a very common way to create chewy textures, like in gummy candy or marshmallow. It turns out it can do just the same in baking. While candy recipes generally require you to "bloom" the gelatin powder to avoid ...


1

I'd recommend resistant wheat starch or resistant corn starch, if you're able to get your hands on them. They both look and function quite similar to regular starch. Resistant Wheat Starch 75 has about 1 g net carbs per 1 Tbsp (unfortunately, it looks like it's been out of stock for months). Resistant Corn Starch 260 has around 3 g of net carbs per 1 Tbsp. I'...


1

As far as I can tell from the recipe, the parmesan cheese is included mostly for flavor, plus a little crispiness as suggested in a comment. The mozzarella and egg are what keep the base together. Omitting the parmesan altogether should work. You can substitute any hard(er) cheese. I would also recommend breadcrumbs if cheese is too expensive, but that will ...


1

Both thicker and thinner can work as long as you roll it out evenly. In my experience, rolling it thinner makes it feel more like "real" wheat dough. However that way it feels more like flatbread than proper pizza crust.


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