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9

If your jars aren't in the refrigerator already, I highly recommend unscrewing the lids as soon as possible...unless you want to be able to share stories about how you found glass shards and the smell of kimchi everywhere in your kitchen one day. Depending on when you mean to eat them, I'd recommend a mix of room temperature ripening and fridge storage. ...


7

I make kimchi regularly. It sits on a shelf at room temperature for a week or more, and slowly ferments. Some people ferment it for months. Sure, it likes a low oxygen partial pressure, but a few hours on a bus isn't going to hurt it.


6

Short answer is "yes". Sour pickles don't get sour because of yeast. Pickles get sour due to lactic acid produced by bacteria, the same way kimchi works. Propably you could even add a bit of real home-made yoghurt to boost the bacteria. The bacteria needed are already present on the cucumbers (even after you wash them, but you shouldn't srcub them too much!)...


6

Kimchi existed long before refrigeration. Infact the sole principle of kimchi is preservation through fermentation. So yes, you can leave it at room temperature for a few hours.


5

That's mold, and you should discard it. Kimchi keeps forever (well, years) if and only if it's not exposed to air, meaning there's always enough liquid in the pot to cover the cabbage. If you have bits poking up into the air and you leave them there for days/weeks, they'll dry out and start growing mold.


5

Sure. The containers should be clean, but because it's an active fermentation (very similar to sauerkraut, other than the ingredient lists typically differing) the salt suppresses the activity of certain undesirable bacteria more than the desirable ones (which are naturally present on the plant leaves), and then desirable ones take over and make things ...


4

The pepper used in Kim chi is actually pretty variable. Not being able to find the genuine Korean powder locally, I've had good luck with 1.5 tablespoons Paprika, 0.5 teaspoon smoked Paprika, 0.5 teaspoon Arbol chili (a medium cayenne also works) per two quarts napa/bok choy etc. mix.


4

You'd be better off trying to find the real thing. Kochukaru is slightly sweeter and smokier than standard 'ground chilli' and simply substituting it will give you variable results to what your kimchi should traditionally taste like. If you know what you're doing, and by that I mean you are able to know what Kimchi is meant to taste like and are able to ...


4

I figured out the problem myself. I used iodized salt. I was suppose to use sea salt or kosher. The fermentation prosess was inhibited by the iodine. I missed this tip the first time but when I looked at more recipes, I found it was a common practice. It took an extra day to show any activity but it is now going strong. Next time I will use sea salt or ...


4

I have quite a bit of experience making homemade kimchee. There are two distinct stages, for me, where salt is used. The first is the initial salting/wilting phase. The cabbage leaves are heavily salted and left to sit, some recipes call for pressing under weight, others do not. Then there is the "stuffing" that flavors the kimchee - chives, scallion, ...


4

This is not simply about water or liquid covering the veg, but brine (salted liquid) covering the veg. The brine is necessary for fermentation and safety. I would worry that your rinse and soak steps washed away too much salt. There is no way to know for sure from your description. When I make kimchi, I salt the cabbage, and leave in a colander overnight ...


3

When making kimchi (or other fermented products like it) it's best to ferment the whole batch together for the first phase (this depends on what you're making, how much of it you're making, and how sour you want it to be - but a week is a good rule of thumb). This helps to make the whole batch more consistent, as one batch will ferment at the same pace - as ...


3

At least in the U.S., there is no legal requirement to list "live cultures" or whatever on food labels. Short of contacting the manufacturer, there's no way to know for certain whether or not it may contain live cultures. Kimchi, like sauerkraut and similar cultured foods, will continue to ferment and change flavor and texture if it has live cultures. ...


3

Kimchi are not preferred to be added directly to soup. Usually you would fry the Kimchi (ideally in Sesame oil) to slightly transparent or having minor brown on the edges, before adding into the soup, and boil for . That is not only applicable to KimChi JiGae- but also other varieties of KimChi broth (e.g. hotpot, Kimchi ramen/noodles (BuDae JiGae) etc.) ...


3

Answer depends on how the kim chi is made. I make it using a variant on this recipe. The protocol there is to treat the leaves with a salty brine for 4 hours, then rinse them extensively. No further salt is added in the recipe, so any salt in the final product will have osmosed into the leaves. Most of that salt won't come back out except with a prolonged ...


3

Mc Cormick now makes Korean Red Pepper Flakes for sale at some Costcos (also in smaller containes at the Supermarket). I bought a large container and I am going back for more. Great flavor and heat for just about everything.


3

Chili powders are different. For one thing, the heat they produce can notably effect different areas of the mouth. Still, they are all chili peppers and many are hot and all are red, when ripe and dry. Also, there are sweet peppers, like paprika, that are not hot at all, or only very mildly, and these pack quite a flavor punch without heat, so it is not ...


3

You should use patience. The sour taste comes from lactic and acetic acid (more lactic than acetic) produced by the fermentation process. Kimchi is essentially "spicy sauerkraut" and both get their acidity from bacteria which are naturally present on the vegetables, aided (over other bacteria) by the right amount of salt (typically 2% by weight or slightly ...


3

Chlorinated tap water. The effect on the ferment may be negligible, but I've never bothered to test it, lest there be unwanted putrefaction. Boil the water that you're going to use to make your brine, then add salt and let cool. The chlorine should volatilize at the boil.


3

Patience. Unless the weather is quite warm, a week is a more typical minimum fermentation time; three weeks if you use a refrigerator method.


3

To mix, use any bowl that won't be damaged by the salt. I would stay away from metal or wood, anything else would be fine. To store, just use a glass jar. I usually use a half gallon canning jar, but if you're making a lot you can use a gallon jar. Cover the cabbage with a big flat cabbage leaf. (Or a grape leaf). Press down, so the leaf is covered ...


2

For a quick fix in case you can't get gochugaru I recommend cayenne pepper mixed with sweet paprika powder. The smoked component is not so strong as to require Spanish smoked paprika, but you may want to try. Despite what people say: If you are used to Indian, Thai or Caribbean cuisine gochugaru will be rather mild. It's content in capsaicin is 3000-8000 ...


2

I made Napa Cabbage Kimchi about 2 and a half months ago and had two containers in the back of the fridge. One was half full in a plastic honey container and a full one. I was worried that it had spoiled by this time but when I tried it, it was delicious. I am not Korean but I have enjoyed really sour kimchi for a long time. I'm so stoked that I have another ...


2

The county I live in produces a lot of chillies called Cheonggyeol (청결). They also produce gochugaru here. Here's a link. After some asking around, I can confirm that these are the peppers they use to make Gochugaru (고추고루).


2

Buy dried chilis and blend them into powder It sounds like this community doesn't know more about the specific peppers used (and their North American subsitutes) than what @janeylicious has proposed. Howeover, I propose a different methodology for finding a good fit. You can buy dried chilis of many varieties from Latino and sometimes American grocery ...


2

Yes. It's almost a required element for me any time I'm eating the standard cheap ramen or noodle bowls. I usually add it at the end so I don't cook all the crunch out of the kimchee. I often take five or six frozen gyoza/dumplings, add them to the small pot of water, bring that to a boil, then add the ramen noodles, then, after the noodle cooking time, ...


2

The Maesri brand will certainly work, as will many others. There are hundreds of kimchi recipes, and no version is any more authentic than another. Many contain whole or sliced fresh chiles (green and/or red) and may contain other ingredients, without any chile powder at all (sometimes called white kimchi). The first time I made red kimchi, the only thing ...


2

I am a bit late to be of use to OP but had to add that in my almost-50 years of native Korean kimchi experience i've never heard of a kimchi jar explosion at room temp - at least not the kind where you see pieces of glass and kimchi all over. The most that happens is juice overflowing the top of a plastic lidded jar. A mason jar with a tight metal lid I'd ...


2

It might not be mold, it could very well be bacteria or yeast. Lactic acid bacteria and yeast would be happy to grow in the acetic kimchi environment. Looking at the photo I'd suspect it's not mold. The advise to discard it is still spot on.


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