72

Microwave doors don't have an airtight seal; the window between the electronics and the cooking compartment is also not airtight, and the electronics are cooled by a fan. It would be surprising if some cooking smells didn't escape. In practice, every microwave I've ever had allows me to smell the cooking, from the very cheapest to some rather fancy ones with ...


46

There is one very different issue to be kept in mind - water in a microwave can overheat and "explode" once it is disturbed. Another poster had exactly this problem a short while ago: Water exploded in Microwave So follow the usual precautions, e.g. putting a wooden toothpick or a small, very clean stone (chemists have them in their labs) in your vessel. ...


41

Metal has a lot of potential issues in the microwave (electric charge buildup + arcing, and microwave reflection). There are too many variables to make general statements like "such-and-such metal is safe" or "smooth objects are safe" with confidence, hence the sweeping guaranteed-safe blanket advice to not put metal in the microwave. The reason it didn't ...


38

Probably generated some chloramines by reaction between the hot bleach and proteins on the stove surfaces. There's no telling exactly which chloramines you created, as we have no idea what amines were on your stove top. However, these things can be quite nasty. Open windows if possible, and leave home for several hours. Your eyes and lungs are giving you ...


33

The steam released by cooking the foods you mentioned, and boiling water outright, would probably damage the wood. Foil might prevent that, if you seal it completely (using some sort of moisture/heat resistant tape). However, that wouldn't eliminate the fire hazard from cooking in an enclosed wooden box--nothing short of adding a layer of fire-retardant ...


31

All cutting (slicing, chopping) knives should be as sharp as you can get them, really. A dull knife is much more likely to cause an accident and cut you. Dull knives are more difficult to use properly and any knife used improperly is likely to lead to accidents. The duller the knife the more pressure you need to apply in order to cut your food, leading to a ...


31

Spoons (most metal, in fact) are generally not a huge problem in the microwave. My microwave has metal parts...many do. Forks are sometimes a problem due to a build up of charge between the tines, which could result in sparks. As you note, shape can be a factor. The shape of spoons spreads the charge, the pointy edges of forks and narrow tines could ...


29

While an oven preheats, the heating element or gas burner will be running at full output. For an electric oven in particular, this will generate a great deal of radiant heat. Radiant heat increases the temperature of the objects it shines on, without directly changing the air temperature. So, if you place a pyrex dish in a cold oven and then turn it on, ...


24

NO! It would not. They will break, possibly violently. Unless they are labeled for that use, don't do it.


24

even the greatest knife masters will forget every once in a while to clean with the edge in the opposite direction No, they won't, not after cutting themselves a couple of times. It's natural to cut yourself while cutting food, occasionally, but I have never cut myself while slipping food from the blade. Always keep the edge away from you, place the side ...


22

I specifically would like to know if anyone has used a (verified) borosilicate glass pot on a gas burner stove top I have used borosilicate glass vessels on a number of different heat sources, both in laboratory circumstances and on a standard home gas stove. and if it is safe for regular use, and by "regular use" I would specifically mean: ...


21

There are actually two things worth considering with metal in microwaves. The big danger is arcing and that happens with pointy things like forks and apparently grapes. It's also worth considering, being in a plastic box, there was nowhere for the spark to jump to. With a fork there's a small enough spark gap for current to jump. With a spoon, there is not. ...


14

First off, if you're living in a dorm room then you've signed a contract saying what you are and aren't allowed to do in that dorm room. Read it. It's very likely that it will include cooking as something you aren't allowed to do, and cooking appliances as something you aren't allowed to own whilst living in that room. The risk of fire from cooking ...


14

I would absolutely not recommend heating Pyrex with any type of direct heat, ever. That stuff goes off like a hand-grenade, highly dangerous - not to mention messy. I've seen it happen too many times for it to be even vaguely worth the risk; even when accidentally placed on recently switched-off hobs. Pyrex is a low-expansion glass. However, low-...


12

It's totally normal to smell the food in a microwave as they aren't meant to be sealed. Microwaves have fans to circulate the air and keep the electronics cool, so they will circulate aromas.


11

No, this is a very, very bad idea. The thermal gradient can lead to uneven expansion and shattering. This is true of the modern product as well as the historical borosilicate product.


11

It needs to be sharp enough to cut easily and cleanly. A sharp knife grips the food, cuts better, and is easier to control. Food also has a nicer presentation with a clean cut. A sharp knife is safer because it is easier to control. It does not need to be razor sharp and cut hair. Cut paper is plenty sharp for meat, fruits, and vegetables. You can also ...


11

Probably not, plus it will get worse over time. I've an old George Foreman with similar marking. Neither oxygen nor chlorine bleach works - plus it smells. The only thing that very slightly works is a good hard scrub with something quite aggressive, oven cleaner or barman's friend etc, which will eventually take all the paint off. You'll just have to live ...


10

Is it safe? That depends on a lot of factors. Generally, no. It isn't. A blog post from the Healthy Home Economist has the opinion of a firefighter: One gal mentioned that her husband was a firefighter and that leaving a stockpot simmering overnight or while they were out of the house was completely out of the question. Source. The NFPA says the ...


10

There is no difference. Whether you boil water in a kettle or in a microwave, it reaches a temperature of 100 °C/212 °F at sea level. Not only that, but no method that doesn't involve pressure will get the water to reach a temperature of over 100 °C/212 °F. Water boiled in a microwave is just as safe as water boiled in a kettle.


9

There's so much heat around a turkey deep-fryer I wouldn't see how light or medium snow would affect your cooking. Any snow is going to melt and probably evaporate before it comes into contact with any hot oil, and any that makes contact will be gone in a flash. I've barbequed in 20 below and in snow, all that it really means is that you need more heat. My ...


9

Looking at it from a materials-science standpoint rather than a physics standpoint, I agree that plastic is safer than glass. The difference is in how they break. Glass is stronger than plastic, for any plastic that a blender jar is likely to be made out of, and is less likely to break from, for example, trying to blend a spoon you forgot to remove. ...


9

Bleach contains sodium hypochlorite. The fumes being released are almost certainly chlorine, which as you have observed, is quite hazardous. Bleach usually contains strong warnings not to mix with any other cleaning chemical, as some of them will tend to rapidly decompose its active ingredient and release a lot of gaseous chlorine. I expect applying heat has ...


9

In order to reliably set your kitchen on fire, make sure there is enough fuel available, and that some of its mass is either brought to its autoignition temperature, OR vaporized and heated to its flash point, then ignited. While electrical arcs of any kind reach tremendous internal temperatures, they are notoriously bad at heat transfer to surrounding ...


9

I doubt you have melted aluminum foil at the bottom of your oven. The melting temperature of aluminum foil is 660 degrees Celsius (1,220 degrees Fahrenheit) at standard pressure. It is possible that you have a layer of grease between some foil and your oven bottom. This combination will likely char and burn. I would clean your oven well, and use as ...


9

One element missing from other answers is how microwave ovens keep the waves inside. They use a Faraday cage https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faraday_cage . The size of the holes you can have in those cages is related to the wave's frequency. In the case of microwaves, millimeters-sized holes are ok. That allows the presence of a vent to let pressure, water ...


8

You can but you probably shouldn't. Stainless steel scrubs are quite coarse, rough and with sharp edges. They are particularly abrasive, suited for scrubbing the pan's metal surface and removing the outer oxidized or grimy layers and achieve a "shiny finish". Used on ceramics I imagine they will scratch the glossy surface quite easily; with continued use ...


7

TL;DR: Plastic is better than Glass. It won't break (don't sue me if it does). If it does, you have about 0.0000518 seconds to get out of the way. A blender I picked at random. It has a powerful 750W motor. A different blender that I saw with 35,000 rpm had a 1725W motor. This divides down to be ≈ 15,200 RPM. The size: 40H x 18W x 18D So the main box ...


7

Are you using non-stick cookware? Beware because there is a well-documented medical effect caused by the fumes released when various non-stick components are heated starting at about 300 °F (149 °C) and beyond. Polymer fume fever You should always have something in a non-stick pan when it is over a flame.


7

You have a few options to lower their explosiveness: Pierce the skin, like you do before baking a potato. Lower your frying temperature can help a bit, but you'll probably always need to use a temperature higher than the boiling point to get any kind of crisping action. Dehydrate the liver a bit before frying. You could use a dehydrator, a low-and-slow oven ...


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