53

In general, you wouldn't want to put a sealed glass bottle filled with any liquid in your oven. If you want to try and are still working on it, remove the cap, empty the alcohol into another container, bake the bottle and cap covered in clay separately leaving room to screw the cap on. Let the bottle cool completely, then add the alcohol back in. It's ...


31

A pointy tip is useful in a boning knife, particularly when getting between meat and sinew, or getting under silver skin. The pointy end of the knife is helpful when removing meat from the bone. I also use the pointy end of a fillet knife to get between the skin and meat of fish, starting the separation, when I want to remove fish skin from the fillet. I use ...


24

Use different modelling clay Two-part putties such as Milliput are just as well designed for fine model-making, and set in air at room temperature. If you start with a white putty then you can mix it with acrylic paint to colour it. It'll be weaker but this probably isn't an issue. It'll also set faster with the water in the acrylic paint though, so only ...


22

I don't know how hot or how long your polymer clay bakes for, so you might get away with it, but in general I wouldn't risk putting a sealed container in the oven, whatever the contents. The primary risk isn't alcohol igniting, but vapour forming in the bottle under pressure can break the bottle or more likely the cap. If the alcohol was going to ignite, it ...


20

Coring tomatoes, i.e. removing stemlike tissue, requires a pointy end knife, as does removing potato eyes and removing blemishes on fruit. Oh yes, stabbing a hole in the bottom of your can of refried beans, so you can simply blow into the can to get the paste out after you've removed the lid. Halving squash, or cutting beets in half etc. goes better if you ...


11

From a practical perspective, trying to sharpen rounded edges is much more challenging than the relatively straight edge you get with a pointy knife. With the rounded blade, you're also stuck with trying to decide, rather arbitrarily, where the sharp edge ought to end. To retain much of the same functionality it seems that it will be necessary to maintain at ...


9

A couple of my knives have lost their points (when my knife block got knocked onto a wooden floor - one tip is still embedded in the floorboards). I've still got the knives, because the lack of a tip doesn't really affect their use for everyday cooking. Luckily my pizza knives are undamaged, because cutting pieces of a pizza does benefit from a sharp point. ...


9

To further @Tetsujin's answer. The Lysol product you have specified as Lysol Clean & Fresh Multi-Surface Cleaner is made of a number of active ingredients. The primary decontaminating component is Alkyl (50% C14, 40% C12, 10% C16) dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride. This is a member of what are known as Quaternary Ammonium Compounds or Quaternary ...


8

It might cause an explosion and a house fire. A sealed bottle would explode without a doubt. The heat differential caused by different thicknesses of clay would stress the glass. The combination of heated alcohol vapour and the heating elements of the oven would probably blow the door off your oven and set your kitchen on fire. If you decide to go ahead, ...


8

Just rinse it off. It sounds simple, but unless it's a very porous surface, a quick rinse should work fine. I would say you're even fine to continue washing your things with a Mr. Clean. I'm sure it's toxic to take a bite out of the "eraser" but I doubt very little (if any) should be left over on hard surfaces like porcelain, and would not likely hurt you in ...


7

Cutting out potato eyes. Removing tomato stem attachment point. Getting started removing the membrane from pork ribs. Cutting a spanakopita into servings. Poking into the tamper-resistant seal on jars of spices. As to safety, I've had a lot more accidents with the sharp edge than the point. In fact I can't remember any accidents with the point.


7

For this onion dicing technique (which I'm using all the time), the tip is essential to get deep into the onion without completely splitting it in half.


5

When I was younger, whenever my mother cooked a leg of lamb she would slice a couple of cloves of garlic, use the point of a knife to create several incisions in the lamb, and insert a slice of garlic in each (similar to steps 1 and 2 of Roast lamb studded with rosemary & garlic from the BBC's Good Food website, but with not as many incisions and usually ...


4

So, let's try to make this into a complete list of what one uses a knife point for: Coring fruits & vegetables Removing eyes, seeds, and brown spots from fruits & vegetables Making holes in skin for marination Scoring skin for roasting Deboning fowl, fish, and meat Cutting slits in fish for roasting Cutting vents in pastry and turnovers Cross-...


3

You're making a pressure cooker. That's a very bad idea. The pressure will escape once it builds high enough. Either will happen: the glass and clay hold together, and the cap blows off, spraying flammable liquid into the hot oven, or the glass and clay shatter, not only spraying flammable liquid into the hot oven but also lots of sharp, high-speed ...


3

potter of 28 years experience here. What you are seeing is called crazing. It's caused by a slightly poor "fit" between glaze and clay body of the ceramics, usually because of too much silica in the glaze. With some glazes, it's intentional; celedons craze, as do white raku glazes. What you're seeing there is unintentional crazing. It's fairly ...


3

I don't think there's enough clarity in the video to answer definitively. So, a couple of critical points: The glass bowl should be floating in the water. Otherwise, it could contact a much higher temperature at the bottom of the pan than whatever temperature the water is at. The water should be heated with the glass bowl in it already. If the water is ...


2

Unless you have a very cheap or extremely cold (think -30 c) glass container, there's absolutely no problem. Even with an extremely cold container, I doubt you'd manage to get it to shatter. The water will heat progressively and so will the glass container. I melted chocolate this way in various container including glass, never had a problem.


2

Flames should not come out of the vents inside the oven. This should not be happening. It could indicate an incorrect or faulty regulator, or ventilation problems. In addition to fire, you may also be at risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. Your oven is not safe to use. Don't use it until you can get it fixed. Since you just bought it, contact the manufacturer/...


2

In the past I made such a mistake multiple times with the same microwave... the one I still use to this day. So if the sparks from the golden part of your mug was the only incident, I believe your microwave is just fine.


1

It is a sweet idea for a gift. But heating closed things makes them blow up. Here is how you can get where you want to be safely. Make a sleeve the size of your bottle. Or use an open empty bottle the same size. Decorate sleeve with polymer clay. Or decorate empty bottle with circumferential clay decor. Put decorated sleeve onto gift bottle with a ...


1

if it's wine vinegar it's completely safe. that's simply a layer of mother of vinegar (mycoderma aceti). If there is still some unfermented sugar in the vinegar it may form even if is a store-bought one. It's a natural process.


1

The "black stuff" is most likely mold. I have found it under the lids of many foods I preserved and ate without suffering any adverse health consequences, including various vinegars.


1

Lysol is a trade name, covering a whole family of quite different products. You will need to be more specific. In short, though… you rinse it with more water until it's gone. If it got inside places it shouldn't, then your choice is to attempt a DIY take-apart [really not recommended] or give it to a professional… or ignore it & eventually it the smell ...


1

I just used one Anchor Hocking glass bowl covered with foil, for a shrimp recipe on top of the trivet, and it cracked in half. :-( Big disappointment.


1

I ground peppermints in my grinder (the same type as shown above) and it did well but left peppermint stuck to the bottom. It was difficult to get out with a damp cloth, so the only way was to either melt the peppermint out with hot water or chip it out with a knife and I did not want to scratch up the inside. I was wondering if water was safe to put in the ...


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