Hot answers tagged

56

Fruit fly trap ! Put some strong smelling vinegar, like apple cider vinegar, in a glass and make the trap by making a cone with a sheet of paper. The strong sweet smell will attract them and they won't be able to get out of the glass.


39

As I’ve recently tried to much success, sucking the bastards with a vacuum cleaner is easy, fast, ruthlessly efficient, and unlike sticky liquid contraptions, it doesn’t carry the risk of accidentally turning into a food source for the flies.


33

The steam released by cooking the foods you mentioned, and boiling water outright, would probably damage the wood. Foil might prevent that, if you seal it completely (using some sort of moisture/heat resistant tape). However, that wouldn't eliminate the fire hazard from cooking in an enclosed wooden box--nothing short of adding a layer of fire-retardant ...


14

Looks like a butter curler to me. A butter curler is a kitchen tool designed to produce decorative butter shapes for use in food decoration. It can also be used to make chocolate and wax shavings. In typical use, the material to be cut is chilled slightly while the curler is dipped into hot water to ease the cutting. Here's an example of a more modern ...


14

First off, if you're living in a dorm room then you've signed a contract saying what you are and aren't allowed to do in that dorm room. Read it. It's very likely that it will include cooking as something you aren't allowed to do, and cooking appliances as something you aren't allowed to own whilst living in that room. The risk of fire from cooking ...


13

Removing whatever it is that they were attracted to is the first step. The second is making traps for them: Find a small container with a tight fitting lid. (I like the ones you get for dipping sauces or other condiments at take-out places) Poke holes in the lid of the container. They should be large enough for the flies to crawl through, but not large ...


10

Try adding a few carnivorous plants that feast on flies not too far away from your fruit bowl: A Nepenthes Ventrata, for instance, requires regular watering and temperatures in the 15-25C range, but is an otherwise fairly low maintenance plant.


10

Other things you can try: add a tablespoon more water at the start reduce the cook-time by 2 minutes let the rice sit for a minute or two with the lid on, sort of "steaming in its own juices" The idea is that if the rice is just a bit damp, it won't stick.


8

I find that a silicone spatula is frequently better at getting the pan clean than a stiff spatula like a wooden one. If your rice is slightly burnt into the bottom, you might have to use both - scratch it off with the wooden spatula, then collect with the silicone one.


8

You can but you probably shouldn't. Stainless steel scrubs are quite coarse, rough and with sharp edges. They are particularly abrasive, suited for scrubbing the pan's metal surface and removing the outer oxidized or grimy layers and achieve a "shiny finish". Used on ceramics I imagine they will scratch the glossy surface quite easily; with continued use ...


7

The rack on the right looks just like a rack to hold tacos. See the below image:


7

A few fly traps can help matters tremendously. Take a plastic bottle, like for water or soda, and slice it in two just below the neck. Now take the neck of the bottle, invert it, and place it inside the base of the bottle. Add a few centimeters of "bait". When I had a terrible fly problem last year, I learned that flies really like the energy drink "Rock ...


7

Try putting a spoon of fat (oil, butter, etc) in the beginning... it will melt and coat the rice/bottom of the pan. I used to always have some rice stuck to the bottom of my pan when I moved into my new home with gas stoves instead of electric. This trick works very well, and now my rice all comes out of the pan clean and easily.


6

The rack on the left appears to be the "King Kooker 12-Slot Leg and Wing Rack for Poultry". It is used for roasting or grilling chicken drumsticks or whole wings.


6

Keep your garlic away from the refrigerator, or any cold storage. Garlic germinates after exposure to cold, which is why it's planted in autumn. This means that putting your garlic in the refrigerator is a bad idea as it will cause it to sprout, which creates undesirable changes in flavor and texture. The garlic you buy at the store has been cured (dried) ...


6

You can try some fly paper from a hardware store. It is cheap and not harmful to other animals or people. Hang it around the problem area and toss it when the problem is gone or replace it when it gets ugly to look at


6

For the rust you can try an oxalic acid cleaner like Barkeeper's Friend (try it on a small spot first!). It's worked great for my bakeware's cooked-on spots, and should be useful for rust as well. Using it will be a bit of trial-and-error, because leaving the metal exposed for too long will etch it, and not long enough won't clean much. For rust ...


6

I mean, I wouldn't eat off them like that. I suggest washing them with regular dishwashing equipment first. Your dishes aren't ruined or anything. A big reason they're made out of something non-porous, like ceramic or metal or plastic, is so you can scrub them clean with soap and water without any food or, uh, other stuff getting stuck inside them. The ...


5

For later maintenance, once the coarse rust is gone: Attack small rust spots with a cloth and a bit of toothpaste as soon as they appear. If you want to keep the cleaver oiled, use a food safe oil of the kind that is also sold to maintain cutting boards (eg food grade mineral oil. Not a cooking oil that could become rancid, not a non-food grade oil like gun ...


5

I live in a studio with a very small kitchen. I also frequently observe my mom when she cooks meals in a tiny boat galley. All of the tips that have been previously mentioned here are excellent, and there's only one that I feel is missing: prepare as many things ahead of time as you possibly can! (In my mom's case, this means doing as much of the prep work ...


5

If you want one, simple technique -- put ingredients away as you use them. When you start the recipe, take out all of the necessary ingredients, and put them on your counter (or somewhere nearby, if your kitchen is as tiny as the one in my first apartment). This gives you a chance to make sure that you're not missing anything critical. As you use them, ...


5

I've had problems with insects, even when I lived in a relatively cool place. (My apartment was next to the trash chute, and on the day they sprayed for bugs, it would drive them into my place for the better part of a week). To help prevent long-term visitors, you want to remove sources of food. A big one is areas of moisture, which start creating small ...


5

Regardless of the (lack of) fire safety of that specific area, your room will have a smoke detector in it. Any time your cooking produces the slightest whiff of smoke, the entire building will be evacuated and the fire brigade automatically summoned. This will make you extremely unpopular and lead to disciplinary action from your university: cooking in your ...


4

I've had this issue for years of living on apartments. After trying just about every off the shelf product nothing worked. I found this mixture to be amazing: Equal parts of the following: Boraic or borax powder Icing sugar All purpose flour Sprinkle this in all your cupboards and around the house (corners). Within three days I was roach free. Since ...


4

There are a variety of types of smoke detectors. Those that are most prone to being set off in the way you describe are the ionization type. As you burn gas on your range or in the oven, it produces carbon dioxide and water vapor, both of which can trigger the sensor on an ionization-type smoke detector. These detectors are, however, cheaper to buy and ...


4

The intention, I think, is that you'll use them for your most ornamental presentation dishes, that are saved for best. If you don't have such things, I'd suggest using them for the rarely used items rather than for pretty things, but that's because I have more rarely used gadgets than decorative kitchen-/table-ware, and am of a practical nature. In ...


4

After doing some more research on this question, I have found that this is actually a pretty common problem because a lot of people build to the ceiling, otherwise the cabinets will collect dust on top. It turns out that the display cabinets up there are mostly used for the following: Fancy china that is not used regularly Fancy pots, like beer steins, or ...


3

I used to be a chef. A trick I learned was to leave maybe half a bottle's worth of beer in a bottle and leave the bottle. They'd go in there and drown. Usually solved the problem in two or three nights if it was really bad. Something else super simple is to tie your trash bags, but leave a tiny bit of an opening. Leave them like that overnight, the flies ...


3

Some tricks that I like: Have something to put trash in right near where I am doing prep. A plastic bag from the grocery, an empty box, or if nothing else, just a steel bowl that is easy to clean. All of the trash, trimmings, and so forth go right into the trash container as they are produced, and when I am all done, that is emptied or discarded into the ...


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