5

Probably a combination of causes. You're using whole wheat flour, which really does not knead like white flour, even used in moderation with other flour: in addition to having less gluten, the shards of bran cut through the dough structure as you knead. Particularly if the "refined flour" (hmm) you were using wasn't high-gluten bread flour, that ...


4

You can achieve great results by hand or using a machine, it's a matter of technique. I prefer kneading by hand as it has the advantage that you can feel the texture of the dough change, and through experience you know when a dough is right. Hand kneading also is good for gauging the hydration of the dough, as you can feel if it seems to dry or too moist and ...


3

Unfortunately, if you attempt to combine the butter into the already risen dough, the dough's structure would most likely get ruined. I wouldn't stress too much over the forgotten butter in the dough though, as the filling will consist of butter as well. Also, you may be able to salvage some flakyness by gently folding in thin sheets of butter into the dough....


3

Regardless of the kneading method you use your loaves need to have a taut skin on top after shaping or they will look ragged. Another consequence of a ragged top is that it doesn't trap the expanding gasses as well and might not rise as high. Boules are easier as you can pull all the dough to the underside in a circle to stretch the top. Baguettes are ...


1

I would say that you simply didn't knead enough, and modeled your expectations on siding that are not similar enough. As Sneftel noted, the whole wheat flour is part of the difference. I'm not sure it has less gluten overall, but it is more difficult to develop, first because of the cutting effect mentioned and second because the bran soaks up a lot of ...


1

That’s a shame after you did all that work. (oops) I’d make a little melted butter and vanilla and brush the cake w/that (lightly) before you frost it.


1

No knead breads follow a high hydration recipe. The typical baker’s percentage for no-knead bread is 75% (meaning for every 100 g flour, you use 75g water). Based on your recipe, i think it might have enough hydration to try the no knead option. I think you can try blending all the liquid ingredients (and also melted butter and sugar) and then move on to ...


1

I am not an expert by any means, but my understanding of the no-knead process is that it really is just TIME that makes all the difference. I do not think you would need to alter the amount of liquid in your recipe. The time is just for the yeast to do its thing and develop flavor in your dough. Kneading accelerates the process, but if you have the time to ...


1

To create gluten from glutenins and gliadins mechanical work is required. So if you want to stick with the NK approach, switching to an even stronger type of flour (Manitoba) or special purpose flour (e.g. Mulino Caputo Nuvola Super) might be your only option. But even then chances are high that the results will not be as good as they could be.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible