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41

Use a sharp knife, dull knives don't slice, they split the same way an axe splits logs and that will generate that sideways force that throws carrot bits. Also learn to practice your slicing and chopping technique. You shouldn't be dropping the blade straight down like a axe or guillotine. You should be moving the blade in a orbital movement, so that you ...


39

One option is to cut the carrots slightly diagonally instead of perfectly square. The resulting pieces are not perfectly cylindrical, but they tend to tipping instead of rolling all over the cutting board. (Note that this method only works if the diameter of the carrot is substantially larger than the thickness of a piece.)


37

This is physics. There's an effect called: "Granular convection" It's a phenomenon where if you have materials of different sizes in a container and vibrate or shake them, that the largest objects will move to the top and the smallest to the bottom. To keep the onion from sinking, you should make the chopped onion pieces bigger relative to the other ...


30

Why bother paying for instruction or books. The best way to learn is watching a video and practicing. Youtube Youtube has a great wealth of videos on knife skills. I'm more a visual learner. I like to see a video. A book are not going to help me squat. Knife Skills: Julliene with Ann Burrell Knife Skills: Chiffonade with Ann Burrell Knife SKills: Slicing ...


24

even the greatest knife masters will forget every once in a while to clean with the edge in the opposite direction No, they won't, not after cutting themselves a couple of times. It's natural to cut yourself while cutting food, occasionally, but I have never cut myself while slipping food from the blade. Always keep the edge away from you, place the side ...


23

I don't think the issue here is dicing vs slicing the onions. The reason why the latter appears to present better in this answer is in my opinion because of the size relative to the other ingredients. In the left hand image, the diced onions are much smaller than the tomato and cucumber, whereas the sliced onion on the right is a closer match in size. This ...


20

Try freezing the oreos first and then cut with a sharp knife. Let the oreos warm to room temperature again. They will not lose any texture or crispiness. Update: In the name of science, I froze some oreos and tested the outcome. Freezing the oreos made the cutting much more...achievable. A room temperature oreo just wants to crumble in too many places, ...


18

Both Escoce's and Elendil's answers are great: the key is a sharp knife, and the vast majority of people (in my experience) do not have very sharp knives in their kitchens. When people come over to my kitchen and try to cut something they are often shocked at how easy it is. If your knives slide off of food (like onion skins or tomato skins) rather than ...


17

I found that slices float better and present better. They don't take much longer to cut and you don't need much onion for a salad. Slices on the right Thick slices can be cut to taste. You want some to sink. I like them for a little crunch. They're easier to pick out if anyone doesn't like onion at all. In some cases thin slices might be better, ...


14

If you take a slender slice off the carrot (down the length), then your carrot is no longer round, and it'll nicely sit on that now-flat side. (You can do this with a sharp knife, or with a few passes of the vegetable peeler). Visually, though, it's hardly noticeable especially after cooking.


13

One thing I've done in the past is use the tendency to roll to my advantage, rather than fighting it. I position a shallow dish to collect the carrots at the "bottom" of the cutting board (the edge furthest away from me), and prop the cutting board up slightly at the "top" end (where I stand). I use a kitchen towel, since that keeps things from sliding ...


12

To my experience, the cutting "trajectory" (not sure if that's the right vocab) of a dull knife is less consistent and less controllable than a sharpened one, and is more subject to be influenced by the texture of the material being cut, especially cutting something hard, thick and fiber-ish such as carrot or big melon.


12

Cutting bacon into cubes was a regular prep task for me when I was cooking professionally, so I got very fast at it. Here are the tricks I found: Fully cooked (baked) bacon cuts MUCH faster and cleaner, and you can make perfect cubes Don't use a serrated knife. It'll be easier to cut with, but it will shred and fray the bacon as you slice, eventually ...


12

Although this is partially personal preference, in general you should have the uncut ingredients on the side of your non-cutting hand. This will set up a logical flow of material which keeps you from having to reach over your cutting hand. If you chop with your right then you'd have the uncut ingredients on your left, as after knife work your chopped ...


11

Back meat on poultry tends to be rubbery, inaccessible, and there is relatively little of it. The meat is almost like other dark meat but is found only in thin sheets. Also since during traditional roasting the back meat is down in the pan it tends to be less cooked than is pleasant for dark meat. It isn't practical to try and carve it because it is a ton ...


11

Egg slicers work very well for this - consistent, thin slices. It's also good for more than just eggs - mushrooms, avocados, mango and strawberries also slice nicely in a well-made model. Avoid the cheap ones - the wires aren't solidly mounted and will break with regular use.


11

Use a bigger, sharper knife. If you're having to apply so much pressure to cut a vegetable that it's flying off into the ether, your knife isn't sharp enough. Furthermore, a blunt knife is a dangerous knife, because it is more likely to slip off the surface of the thing you're cutting and end up in your hand.


8

For vegetable knives, the main advantage of the front-side single bevel is that it's easier to make super-thin cuts. For example, a test of knife skill involves paring daikon radish to remove the peel, then continuing to cut to make a long continuous paper-thin strip, longer than you would be able to make if you just sliced it. See, for example, http://www....


8

Between slices, dip your (very sharp) knife in water. It really does work. You don't want your knife wet enough that it makes your eggs wet, it just lubricates. Also, the eggs should be very cold before slicing. Your finger food looks great BTW.


8

Let me tell and admit that usage of Aruvamanai is a bit tricky. It is not mostly used by younger generations. But my mother and my mother in law still use them and they wont switch to board and knife. I have seen watching them use it skillfully, hence I can tell the ways to hold it down and use it properly. First sit on the floor with left leg extended ...


8

I found only two Youtube videos demonstrating the use of the aruva(-)manai: In cleaning fish with an Aruvamanai you see that the woman has small, delicate gesture when she moves her hands in the direction of the blade, and larger gestures when she moves the fish across the blade (for descaling). Her thumbs/fingertips are already 'behind' the edge when she ...


7

After 4 years... the classical spoon based method for avocado processing is obsolete. The Triptych Peel Method This combines a well known method to remove the seed, with a scheme for conservatively reducing the skin tension by a series of shallow cuts along the surface. This process allows for direct removal of both seed and skin, with minimal effort and ...


7

Tried a lot of ways, grating, cutting with knife and food processor. Huge fails. This worked, use thinner pieces of ginger. Cut with clean scissors half way up in small rows. Do not cut all the way to the end. Turn the ginger and cut on the side (criss crossing). Clean your scissors with warm soapy water and a brush often (tried oil, didn't work as ...


7

I first remember seeing Melissa d'Arabian demonstrate using KITCHEN SHEARS to cube bacon during her season on "The Next Food Network Star". I tried it soon after and I find that the scissor action of the shears makes it EASY to cube bacon. Clean, consistent easy to use.


7

I just ignore slices that stick to the blade. Each typically gets pushed off by the next one, so you only have one or perhaps a couple of slices on the blade at a time. When I've sliced the whole thing, I can wipe them off. This doesn't work when you're rough-chopping, in that delightfully casual way the TV chefs say "just run your knife through it all a few ...


7

Try a mandoline. If you're not familiar, it's a gadget that has a horizontal blade for slicing as you slide food across it. Most have a dial that allows you to adjust thickness or to create julienne or "French-fry" shape. You can then just do one more chop to turn the "fries" into dice. Aside from that, I'd be remiss if I didn't make a plug for improving ...


7

If you are not bothered about the shape of the vegetables, you can cut the (for example) carrot along its length, then place the flat side against the chopping board. You can then slice, dice or whatever with much less effort, and the carrot pieces won't roll off the board.


7

There is no law of nature that requires salad to be served in a bowl. In fact I rarely see it served in a bowl: I'm used to seeing it served on a plate. You can toss together the leafy components, dressing, and any other ingredients you want to mix well, plate them, and then sprinkle the onion on top and serve.


6

Another option is to pre-cut the bars, before baking. You will still need to cut after, but the ingredients will have been cut through, making it easier and far less likely to crumble.


6

I would say a chef's knife, for sure. Make sure it's sharp! If you've never sharpened your knives (not just honed using a steel) it can make a world of difference. If you are having troubles, making sure the meat is chilled will help. Straight out of the fridge works okay, but it is even easier if you throw it in the freezer for 15 minutes or so.


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