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64

The magnets themselves don't dull them; they're not nearly strong enough to deform a blade. But it is possible to damage your knives on those racks. It's very easy to drag the blade along the rack a bit as you pull it off, and easy for the magnet to snap it against the rack as you put it on. Both are avoidable, though. When removing the knife, you twist it ...


56

From this link The key to slicing and portioning foie is to treat it like a rich mousse-cake: Make sure to heat up your knife under running water in between every slice. A cold knife will catch and stick in the foie, causing it to tear or crumble. A hot knife will melt the fat as it goes through, leaving you with clean, smooth surfaces to sear.


32

Ceramic knives: cut get through metal detectors at night clubs Steel knives: cut smash (garlic, ginger...) pry (potato eyes) look good scare burglars stick to metallic thingies on the wall don't scratch glass cutting boards (anyone cringing?) don't snap when thrown dropped. have zen-like qualities, sharpening them is pure meditation. have good mass, more ...


31

All cutting (slicing, chopping) knives should be as sharp as you can get them, really. A dull knife is much more likely to cause an accident and cut you. Dull knives are more difficult to use properly and any knife used improperly is likely to lead to accidents. The duller the knife the more pressure you need to apply in order to cut your food, leading to a ...


26

In general, ceramic knives are great for what they do, but too fragile to do everything. They can shatter if dropped on a hard surface, and can easily get get notched on bone. I use my ceramics exclusively for vegetables for that reason. If you're strapped for funds, you really only need to by one expensive knife (a steel chef's knife or santoku), and ...


22

Typically, you don't want to buy a 'set' of knives. You're better off buying the knives that you specifically want. Often, you'll want to get a mix of knives from different manufacturers, so that you can get the best knife for each purpose. As for what to look for ... I'd have to say that the main issues these days are weight, handle, and how the knife is ...


20

Advantages no hand needed to hold the food, therefore safer for children or those lacking knife skills quicker for those lacking knife skills no need for gloves when cutting foods that can irritate the skin, like chillies. Disadvantages Awkward and dangerous to wash in between the blades for the double-blade version. Difficult to store safely A unitasker ...


19

Yes, I've heard this suggested, using wet/dry sandpaper and a mousepad. It is a very inexpensive way to match a whetstone, and you can use sandpaper with the same grit to produce an excellent edge. You duct-tape the sand-paper together so it wraps around the mouse pad, and then pull the knife along the sandpaper with the edge trailing. This is to say, you ...


18

Using separate cutting boards is advisable, but separate knives are unnecessary. 90% of my cutting is done with my chef's knife. I don't own two of these, nor would I use a subpar knife for the job. I almost always find it most convenient to start my preparation by cutting the veggies, fruit, etc. first and then finally cutting the meat last. Then you can ...


18

The reason you're seeing conflicting opinions is because there are a number of factors (including steel composition, grind angle, grind profile, and usage) that contribute to a knife's edge-holding ability. German/European knives are made of a softer steel than Japenese knives - they need sharpening more often but are easier to sharpen because of the ...


18

I am assuming by "fluted knife", you mean what is sometimes called a granton or hollow edge knife, where there are indentations in the blade intended to reduce sticking or adhesion to the food: Except in very specific circumstances, this feature makes very little difference, those circumstances being: Carving large roasts Cutting large and tough vegetables ...


18

Even for meat eaters, almost all knife work is done on vegetables. Santukos and chef's knives are general purpose knives, with great utility on vegetables. Chinese cleavers are also general purpose knives, the functional equivalent in that culture to the chef's knife. The advice offered to you in this question: Which knife is best for somone just ...


17

I bought my first mezzaluna because I have advanced arthritis and can no longer use a chef's knife properly. It's an absolute lifesaver being able to push down with the strength of both hands instead of relying on a weakened arm with a wrist that doesn't bend attached to a clawed hand that cannot grip a knife the right way. My "go-to" knife is a fairly ...


17

There's no question that a 4 or 5 inch utility knife is going to see a lot less use than your chef's knife or your paring knife, both of which have innumerable uses. The utility knife is a lot more specific, really being for cases where the paring knife is too short and the chef's knife is too heavy or thick. I have a 4" utility knife, which (of course) I ...


17

At a microscopic level metal is malleable, and so the edge tends to bend rather than spall or break off. Still, it is probably technically true to a certain extent, and based on many many years of metal knife usage by millions or billions of people through history, completely irrelevant. Whatever effect it may have is vanishingly small.


16

It is a multi-tool, which appear to have been given out as novelties. The bottle opener and serrated knife are obvious, the slits are there to act as a pot strainer, the semi-circle shape and flat surface allows you to hold it against the edge of a pot and pour out the liquid while keeping solid bits in. I found a few of them on Ebay, the good links (as of ...


16

One should try not to situate the cutting station away from the sink. Most of the time you clean what you are going to cut and you have scraps to put down the garbage disposal. If you need to clean the knife you also need to clean the cutting board. If I had to carry a lone knife around I would extend my arm down the knife next to my thigh blade pointing ...


15

I think it helps the knife to pass through the foie gras quickly without anything sticking to the surface of the knife blade, making for cleaner cuts. Enjoying foie gras


14

I work in a fine dining restaurant, and the standard implement is a bench scraper AKA a dough knife AKA a bench knife. It's basically a stiff, 6" wide sheet of stiff metal with a handle, and can pressed or rocked down on the counter to cut dough into portions. It can also be used to move shaped bread or rolls, cut pastry, fold sticky doughs, and scrape off ...


14

Microscopic metal particles won't hurt you. The iron in fortified breakfast cereal is just food-grade iron particles. You can collect them with a magnet.


13

Carbon steel is more malleable and less brittle than stainless steel. This means that it is easier to hone on a knife steel, to maintain an extremely sharp edge. Some folks feel that the benefit of that sharp edge–for example, in easily slicing tomatoes, and other very fast prep tasks–is worth the compromise of more persnickety maintenance.


13

Judging from the picture, the knife gets thinner towards the spine after reaching a point of maximum thickness somewhere in the middle of the blade. This means a straight piece of sticky food cannot stick to all of the blade face at once unless it actually bends to conform to its curvature - and marzipan is a rather stiff medium. Also, since the food will ...


12

In order to "Sanitize" any surface you must wash that surface (in this case, knife blades) with water at no less than 190°F (~88°C) according to the (U.S.A) National Sanitation Foundation (NSF). Earlier this year the Conference for Food Protection recommended reducing that standard to 160°F (~71°C) as an "energy saving measure" citing a study at Ohio ...


12

Cutting bacon into cubes was a regular prep task for me when I was cooking professionally, so I got very fast at it. Here are the tricks I found: Fully cooked (baked) bacon cuts MUCH faster and cleaner, and you can make perfect cubes Don't use a serrated knife. It'll be easier to cut with, but it will shred and fray the bacon as you slice, eventually ...


12

At the time of my engineering degree (mid-1990s), the knowledge for true Damascus steel was lost, much like the knowledge of the recipes for the concrete used in the Roman Colosseum. It's possible that more materials analysis has been performed since that point, as there have been a number of groups who would like to reproduce the process to determine how ...


12

A stone is the hardest way to sharpen a knife. If you don't get the angle exactly right, you'll just be messing up your knife, not sharpening it. If you do want to go that way, yes, you'd definitely want to practice on something cheaper, because it's likely you will mess it up. This is why a lot of people just take their expensive knives to a professional to ...


12

Carbon steel (and I assume this knife is carbon steel) is supposed to do that. The surface staining changes with every exposure to acidic ingredients, and will eventually stabilize. This so called patina will actually keep the blade from rusting properly and/or transferring metallic tastes to food. That said, there are a few spots (the orange ones) here ...


11

Stamped knives are stamped from a sheet of steel- therefore the metal is all one thickness (or thinness). Forged knives will be thicker at the back and taper to the front. So- a stamped knife will never have a bolster, a forged knife may or may not.


11

You can do anything with this knife that you would do with your santoku or Western-style chef's knife. These are real tools, and they are not especially delicate. It is certainly possible to chip the edge or tip (which requires an annoying amount of work to fix), if you drop the knife or, as the manufacturer warns, whack it against bones. This is a ...


11

It needs to be sharp enough to cut easily and cleanly. A sharp knife grips the food, cuts better, and is easier to control. Food also has a nicer presentation with a clean cut. A sharp knife is safer because it is easier to control. It does not need to be razor sharp and cut hair. Cut paper is plenty sharp for meat, fruits, and vegetables. You can also ...


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