6

If you want your Kombucha be strong, consistent, and to taste like a commercial one, then you need to use the same SCOBY contained in a commercial kombucha. Remember, making Kombucha, just like brewing wine, mead, or beer, is nothing more than glorified yeast herding. You give the SCOBY what it wants to eat, and it does the rest. It's really that simple. You ...


5

Your question has two facets. I’ll answer the first one. While brewing beer or wine as well, you’re advised to sterilize all the equipment and use a specific culture of bacteria. The reason for that is, if the “stuff” you’re trying to ferment gets some wild yeast/mold/bacteria, your end results won’t be what you desire. So you’re trying to minimize that ...


4

Do not EVER refrigerate a kombucha scoby, as this will weaken several of the bugs comprising it and make it more susceptible to mold. You can actually just let it keep going past 10-14 days. The tea will continue to acidify and the scoby will be happy hanging out in it. Just leave it where it won't be disturbed, as always. Here's an article which talks about ...


4

I use 1 rounded teaspoon for 12 to 16 ounces (depends on the mug I'm using), so about 8 teaspoons (or about 2 1/2 tbsp) for a gallon of water. Hot water, just under boiling, is best. Ideally, the water is heated and poured onto the tea at just under boiling. Because I don't think you want to boil a gallon of water, I'd use the amount of hibiscus for a ...


4

There's two reasons for preferring the original instead of the Synergy version: Most people make kombucha with a neutral base and then put in additional flavors when bottling. By starting with a pre-flavored kombucha, it gives you less flexibility in the flavors you might chose for yourself. For example, if you wanted to make a strawberry & basil ...


3

Absolutely you can. I typically use a Turbinado sugar when making mine because it's what I buy in bulk and because I like the robust flavor. In my searches, I did come across this article indicating that you shouldn't use such raw sugars because they're more difficult for the scoby to digest, but as long as you start with a healthy one you should be fine. ...


3

If you're talking about raw kombucha (rather than pasteurized) then the answer is yes, inevitably, in the sense that it loses its desired probiotic properties. The kombucha will start to grow its own culture (though small), more commonly referred to as a mother or a scoby, which forms at the top of the bottle (container) and in time will take on both the ...


3

When they say "probiotic", what they mean is that there are microbe cultures present in the kombucha. It's really nothing more than a sweetened tea which has been fermented by a symbiotic mix of yeast and bacteria. The odor and distinctive flavor is the result of a low alcohol content and acetic acid (the same acid found in vinegar) produced by the ...


2

Pasteurisation would reduce viable cell count in your kombucha which is undesirable. Refrigeration, as I just recently discovered, only slows the growth of the scoby but it would give you enough time to keep the liquid clear. Given enough time (>3 months in my case), you will see growth at 3C. Whether it is a single or double ferment, there is really no ...


2

I'm not terribly familiar with the nuances of kombucha, but I suspect the answer lies between "maybe" and "probably". The key question is, how similar the finished kombucha tastes like the original tea used - the more that is the case, the more the initial tea quality will matter. The few times I've had kombucha, it has seemed not terribly similar to plain ...


2

You do not have to use tea to make kombucha. For example, the Noma Guide to Fermentation contains seven kombucha recipes, none of which use actual tea. A recommended way of storing SCOBYs when not brewing is to store them in a water + sugar solution, which needs to be refreshed every so often. Thus, your suggested method of making "kombucha" from water + ...


2

All of your scobies look safe and healthy. They will start out thin and slimy. If you want to grow a more substantial scoby, leave your ferment for longer than usual until it is strong enough to not crumple completely and can continue to grow in future batches. For your food safety concerns, you want to avoid anything green, blue, or fuzzy. One method of ...


2

The whole point is that nobody is able to give you a meaningful prediction model for food poisoning, or else food safety would be much easier. The models which exist and are used by the FDA to set up food safety rules are as complex as weather prediction models. "Used for 1000 years" is also completely unrelated to modern food safety, during most of these ...


1

The SCOBY should act in the presence of fresh sugar, so if you are getting cold tea, then it isn't working, assuming all the conditions of time, temperature and clean vessel are met. You can try again, dosing with a little more sugar, but if it isn't turning tea into booch then it is probably dead. Not sure if you cultured that SCOBY or bought it, so you ...


1

When Kombucha gets old it turns to vinegar, then one can make salad dressing out of it. I have been brewing booch for while now and that has been the ultimate out come. I double ferment with ginger and home grown berries so when mine get old, i all ready have a vinegarette waiting for me. Hope that helped


1

I brew Kombucha and use Organic but refined sugar. This helps especially when cooler temps come and the brewing time slows down because of it. The harder you make food available for the scoby the slower the brew time. With a slower brew time comes a higher risk of contamination. Remember that the sugar isn't for you, it's to feed the scoby If you flavor ...


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