52

The concern with garlic in oil leading to botulism is about long-term storage, usually in the context of garlic oil as a 'shelf-stable' condiment; the botulism needs time to grow in the anaerobic environment provided by the oil. If you're making a marinade and using it within a few hours or a day or two, as marinades tend to be, and especially if you're ...


8

Sounds like Daikon Radish to me. It is commonly found in Korean supermarkets and looks slightly like parsnip. Some can grow longer than 2 feet. Another possibility is Parsley Root. These look very similar to Parsnips but are generally not as bulbous near the top, longer and more slender.


7

That's mold, and you should discard it. Kimchi keeps forever (well, years) if and only if it's not exposed to air, meaning there's always enough liquid in the pot to cover the cabbage. If you have bits poking up into the air and you leave them there for days/weeks, they'll dry out and start growing mold.


5

It is a fermented chili paste made with rice and fermented bean paste. You could make it at home if you can find all the ingredients. But it looks like a complex recipe and preparation. For example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5IqtT0HcXUE Here's a simpler version (less traditional) : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QiWJor3DQgI I would substitute with ...


5

There is a particular baked good called kastera in Korea, but they pretty much use the term as a generic name for any Western-style sweet cakes (source: my Korean mother-in-law). So the answer is yes and no. You will find a kastera equivalent to Japanese kasutera, but it is a subset of the kastera set. The closest comparison I can think of would be the term ...


5

My friend who was in Korea for a few months said that they are obsessed with cheese. It's not a traditional ingredient, but in modern cuisine they try to introduce cheese to some of the dishes - I guess this is the case you described. In my city (Poznań, Poland) there is a Korean restaurant specializing in bibimbap and the serve one option with mozarella ...


4

The author of the linked recipe appears to be substituting in turn for gochujang, which in addition to spice has a bit of a yeasty, fermented flavor not unlike miso (no surprise, since both include fermented soybean). Sambal oelek will be brighter, generally hotter, and looser in texture. It's less of a paste than the chili stuff used here, so the ...


4

Kahm Yeast. Very common on pickled products "above the brine." Annoying but not actually hazardous. To avoid, make sure there is no "above the brine." Wikipedia "yeast" article: The appearance of a white, thready yeast, commonly known as kahm yeast, is often a byproduct of the lactofermentation (or pickling) of certain vegetables, usually the result ...


4

No. Mirin is a sweet saki for cooking, with a very neutral flavour. Mijak is a ginger flavored wine. If you are cooking a dish that calls for mirin and ginger, you can skate by using mijak. Otherwise, no.


3

You can always just make your own Korean chili oil. For example, here's The Woks of Life formula for chili oil: 1½ cups oil (ideally a vegetable, peanut, or grapeseed oil…light olive oil is fine, but it has a tendency to set in the fridge) 5 star anise 1 cinnamon stick, preferably cassia cinnamon 2 bay leaves 3 tablespoons Sichuan peppercorns ¾ ...


3

Does this product represent a dish in Korean cuisine or is it a fusion variation? If I could find a name I could find a recipe. It does not appear to be a korean dish, rather a version of the chinese pork jerky, which has been seasoned with a korean bbq style. How could I both cook and preserve my pork? If you are trying to replicate the product, it ...


3

The county I live in produces a lot of chillies called Cheonggyeol (청결). They also produce gochugaru here. Here's a link. After some asking around, I can confirm that these are the peppers they use to make Gochugaru (고추고루).


3

Think soluble fiber. The following excerpt from WebMD explains very well the difference between soluble and insoluble fiber and lists foods where each can be found. Soluble vs. Insoluble Fiber Soluble fiber dissolves in water. Insoluble fiber does not. [...] Soluble fibers attract water and form a gel. [...]


3

I made it without nappa. This is my recipe which turned out pretty good!! Kimchi cabbage: Cabbage, salt, water 1. Rinse cabbage 2.Cut into strips 3.Rise again and put salt 4.Store in cool area. Wait 5-8hours Sauce: Celery, onion, garlic powder, garlic paste, ginger powder, chili powder, Hoi sin sauce Soy sauce, worchesteshire, stir fry sauce,sugar. 1.Chop ...


3

Some ingredients more effectively transfer flavor to stock in dried form than in fresh or pickled form. Mushrooms, kelp, fish and shellfish are examples of those types of ingredients. You won't find an exact substitute for them, but they do keep for a long time, so it doesn't hurt to keep them on hand. However, Japanese and Korean cuisine have many ...


3

At least in the U.S., there is no legal requirement to list "live cultures" or whatever on food labels. Short of contacting the manufacturer, there's no way to know for certain whether or not it may contain live cultures. Kimchi, like sauerkraut and similar cultured foods, will continue to ferment and change flavor and texture if it has live cultures. ...


3

The two have almost nothing in common, beyond being fermented and pastes (though doubanjiang is only sort of paste-like). The ingredients (broad beans and chilies versus soybeans) and the taste are very different. That’s not to say that you’re not allowed to make a sauce for your ssam with doubanjiang, of course. But one is not a straightforward substitute ...


2

Buy dried chilis and blend them into powder It sounds like this community doesn't know more about the specific peppers used (and their North American subsitutes) than what @janeylicious has proposed. Howeover, I propose a different methodology for finding a good fit. You can buy dried chilis of many varieties from Latino and sometimes American grocery ...


2

Not sure if this is what you are looking for, but thought I'd post that in researching, I found that Korean side dishes are called banchan, and the specific dish that you are speaking of might be kale namul: Kale namul 케일나물 (Korean Seasoned Kale) Makes 2 cups 1 pound kale 1 green onion 1 clove garlic, finely minced 1 tsp. soy sauce 1 tsp. roasted sesame ...


2

I'm a microbiologist in dairy. Only two things normally grow in such an acidic environment as kimchi. Yeast or fungi (mold). The two microorganisms are practically the same. Fungus is a mutiple-cell organism and yeast a single-cell organism. The two can change under influence of circumstances (such as temperature). So fungus can become yeast and the other ...


2

It might not be mold, it could very well be bacteria or yeast. Lactic acid bacteria and yeast would be happy to grow in the acetic kimchi environment. Looking at the photo I'd suspect it's not mold. The advise to discard it is still spot on.


2

Asking if something is worth it is opinion based, so I will address the differences between the results you get braising chicken thighs skin on and off as I've done both many times. Chicken thigh skins have a lot of fat, when you braise the fat stays in the end result because there's nowhere for it to go, which can make it too greasy for some tastes. The ...


2

If you are referring to gochujang, gochugaru and gochujang have significantly different flavors (gochugaru is thought to impart a "cleaner" hotness to dishes, while gochujang tends to be a bit more complex due to aspects like added sugar and grain e.g. rice flour (which adds a thickening element) and some fermentation. Thus Korean recipes will ...


1

It depends on exactly what you want out of the chicken. Braising consists of browning food and then boiling. Browning meat gives it more flavour on the outside. Each piece will develop flavours on the outside only thanks to the Maillard reactions. Boiling meat breaks the tissue down. I don't think that chicken thighs require any more cooking than heating ...


1

I would use any asian Chili oil. My experience is that they are pretty much the same. I have access to an asian supermarket and all the chili oils are in the same place in the market as well as the hot sauces. Chili oil is very spicy. If not available us Siracha near the end of the saute process instead.


1

I'd like to answer the part of your question that isn't a recipe request. I'm going to paraphrase it as: Is X a "thing" [in American cuisine]? The answer, my curious friend, is a resounding yes... contingent on whether or not you make it. We here in the States have the preposterously good fortune of having access to ingredients from all over the world ...


1

I marinated the meat for 24 hours in the Korean No1 Marinate and I added more brown sugar sesame seed and 1/4 can of coke and sprinkle of salt when I put the meat on the dehydrator. The dehydrator is with the heater and fan. I still rotate the trays every hour. The meat stayed soft, chewy and very tasty.


1

As far as I know, Korean and Japanese tofu are effectively identical in taste and preparation: my Japanese wife, who is generally quite particular about her ingredients, happily buys Korean brands from a Korean grocery for her Japanese cooking. If you're dead set on making your own, in both countries the key ingredient for curdling is nigari (Japanese) aka ...


1

Some substitutions I would suggest to get that similar umami taste that both these products provide and are similar would be: Bonito flakes also know as Katsuobushi Dashi Nori Shiitake Mushrooms (dry)


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