18

There's no benefit to putting the garlic in as slices from a flavor point of view, it's the cooking that brings the garlic flavor out. I've found that no matter how you do it the garlic flavor pretty much stays with the garlic rather than spreading throughout the meat - you don't get some even garlic hum throughout, instead you get parts with intense garlic ...


12

Potato chips have to be fried in lots of oil. If you are using little, you are doing it wrong and your chips are less tasty than they could be. As Preston Fitzgerald mentioned in a comment, salt doesn't dissolve in oil. It could be that it will fall to the bottom. Alternatively, the convection in the hot oil could move it around. But still, the salt will ...


11

The reason people choose Kosher/Sea/Rock salt over table salt is mainly down to the crystal size and the lack of additives like iodine. Kosher salt is less soluble and less dense than table salt. The large crystals in these salts mean that unless there is a fair bit of water present they don't completely dissolve. This means it is less likely you'll over ...


8

Kosher salt is processed differently and has no iodine in it, so some people like the flavor better. It's not going to make that much difference, any salt will do. Just don't oversalt it, you want to taste the meat, not the salt.


6

You can use Kosher salt or sea salt or even table salt but keep in mind that they are interchangeable by weight NOT volume. Volumetric measurements fail because of different sizes and shapes of salt crystals. Kosher salt crystals are, as you pointed out, larger and end up with larger gaps between the crystals when measured by volume than the smaller table ...


6

"Kosher" salt has nothing to do with parve rules except maybe in the application of "koshering" AKA dry-brining (as a devout atheist, I haven't a clue on that one). It is coarser than regular table salt (making measurements slightly different) and it contains no added iodine. Certain food snobs (ehem) tend to find it somewhat superior in taste. In general, ...


6

Alton Brown just generally prefers kosher salt, for reasons that don't really apply to peanut butter, which will be ground down anyway. What matters is the total weight of salt. Remember, kosher salt tends to weight approximately 1/2 as much (depending on brand) as table salt, per unit of volume. So you can replace the kosher salt with sea salt, or any ...


5

You don't describe the recipe, so it's hard to say why the author insisted on Kosher salt. If you're supposed to rub the salt on the steak to remove surface blood, then kosher salt is more effective than table salt. If the salt is just a seasoning, Kosher salt (which has bigger granules than table salt) will add a grittiness that some people enjoy. Either ...


5

There's no chemical difference between the two, assuming they are both sea-salt originally. Kosher salt tends to be more in flakes composed of small crystals than coarse sea-salt, which is a more rough individual crystalline form. Both should work just fine in your grinder, though the spacing between the two surfaces of the grinder might affect how well ...


4

Another way to achieve what you're looking for... My mother in law will cut her beans and add salt to them. Because the beans have been washed in water, there's enough water to dissolve the salt. She'll then deep fry the beans for a specific dish, and when the beans are done frying, they're salty enough. She does this with eggplant and bitter gourd as well, ...


4

The difference in salt is more related to how the salt is being used. So for the purpose of quickly salting before cooking or at the table any type of salt will do. However if you are salting your meat at least an hour in advance and letting it rest before cooking (which I HIGHLY recommend you do) then using the larger grains of Kosher salt has a positive ...


3

The best peanut butter, in my subjective opinion, contains peanuts and nothing else. Liquidize the nuts in a food processor until it's as smooth as you want it; and you're done. Peanut butter made this way might go a bit stiff if you leave it, but give it a good stir and it'll go back to normal. Good wholefood brands sell ready-made peanut butter of this ...


3

Salt is salt if dissolved into a liquid or blended into a paste. Kosher salt is just larger crystals, it tastes and works the same as any other salt. It is mostly called for because it has become "fashionable". Kosher salt does have specific culinary uses, but not as a dissolved or blended ingredient. There is no global standard on table or kosher salt ...


2

All of the suggestions that sea salt, course, fine or flaked, are the equivalent of kosher salt are misleading at best. Kosher salt in the US is a standard kitchen salt, not used solely for koshering. Its larger granules allow for more precise salting of foods during prep, cooking and serving. There are two main brands, Diamond Crystal and Morton's, ...


2

The texture of the salt used is key here. Try using dust-fine salt (use a mortar or grinder) instead of the usual, still relatively coarse table or kosher salts: it will actually adhere to the fried food instead of being accidentally eaten alongside, and you have more control over the dosage. And no, salt in oil might help dehydrate the food a little ...


2

Kosher salt is fine. The salt crystals should dissolve without a problem. You should season at the beginning and end of cooking - add salt with, say, the onions and spices, then season to your taste at the end, after any reduction of gravy.


1

Your plan seems fine. Cut the slits and insert garlic slices when you take the leg of lamb from the fridge and let it rest for 30 minutes or so. Until it reaches room temperature. Sometimes besides garlic, I also cut slits and insert pieces of bacon in the lamb, too. My family loves that roast.


1

The professional catering services will leave the freshly cut potato chips to soak in a sugary/saline solution for 12 hours prior to frying. If you want to add even more finesse, McDonald's is rumored to add additional additives such as phenethyl alcohol & dimethicone to its French Fries.


1

Melbury and Appleton sell it on line. They have a minimum order level of £10 before VAT and postage. London customers can order on-line and collect from their warehouse which is at marlborough Road, Islington. http://www.melburyandappleton.co.uk/kosher-salt---136kg-3-lb-9980-p.asp I have not ordered anything from them myself but do need Kosher Salt for a ...


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