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20

None of those is a necessary element in bolognese; find a recipe that doesn't use them (use beef mince, or quorn).


20

Meat lasagna minus meat will not be as satisfying - it'll be missing both a flavor and texture component. And tofu by itself does not have much flavor, especially compared to the rest of the lasagna. Substituting for meat is a broad question, as you'd see if you'd tried searching for vegetarian lasagna. If you're determined to make something that's as close ...


11

There are many bolognese variations out there, some which have milk in them, but there are many which do not as well. My understanding is that a traditional bolognese does not have milk, but as always with Italian food what's traditional is what Mama makes. In any case, you can drop the milk products without substituting anything for them. I don't think that ...


9

I'll try to weigh on in this as much as possible with a non-authoritative answer: First of all, I simply can't state this emphatically enough: kashering is not brining! A kosher bird is not "pre-brined", and professional chefs who claim that it is are either misinforming their audiences or simply misinformed themselves. Kashering (sometimes called ...


8

There are a few aspects to consider, but will always boil down to "you have to ask the individual". Making a piece of cookware "safe" for a given person involves two components: Removing the contaminant in question in a manner that will prevent accidental ingestion of said contaminant. Making the item seem un-contaminated. At first glance this is similar ...


8

Yes! I was able to make a panna cotta using this product in a standard recipe with some minor changes. Just incorporate the Jell Dessert powder where the gelatin is called for and subtract 1/4-cup from the prescribed sugar. I started with this recipe on JoyofBaking.com. The recipe, like most I've seen, calls for one standard 1/4-ounce packet of gelatin. ...


8

My favorite meat replacement for lasagna is mushrooms, preferably a mix of the more hearty mushrooms like Shitake, Lion's Mane, Porcini or others. If those aren't available, most stores have "Baby Bella" or "Crimini", which are just the young version of the "big" Portobellas, and a darker variety (with a little more flavor) than the white button mushroom. ...


8

Sauces like pan sauces and Roux-thickened sauces like bechamel or veloute are not traditionally finished in the same way. Pan sauces, like for steak au poivre involve deglazing, reducing (still primarily water-based liquid,) and either reducing further with heavy cream, or adding cold butter directly and not heating anymore, so it stays emulsified. Roux ...


7

Depending on the dish, maybe duck confit. It works really well in tacos. It has the nice unctuous fat and goes well with tomatillo and avocado. But it'd probably be hard or expensive to get in large quantities.


7

While some of the kosher rules are food-safety rules developed by the Israelite priests (or given by God), the prohibition against mixing meat and milk is because of an ancient ritual that involved cooking the meat of a slaughtered animal in its mother's milk, a religious practice forbidden in Exodus 34:26 "... You shall not boil a kid in its mother's milk",...


6

My company now distributes the Omnia Oven which is a modern version of a wonder pot. These are available at http://lunatecgear.com/products/travel-gear/omnia/ and Amazon. You are welcome to contact us if you have questions about Omnia. 858.653.0401 Cheers, Nick


6

You are not going to find any other meat with quite the same unctuous texture as pulled pork and mild but meaty flavor. Certainly no cut of beef will do so. If you feel compelled to use beef, use the corresponding cut of beef, which is the chuck. It will pull (although a little more shreddy), but it won't have the same texture, and it will have the ...


5

I explained several of the differences in my answer to Brining a kosher bird and also discussed some issues relating to salt consistency in a much earlier answer to Chicken comes out salty... occasionally. To make a long story short, kashering is a long process with many steps, but the part you're concerned with is similar to the "dry brining" technique ...


4

Your issue revolves around 2 things: Some (not all by any means) vegans have a tendency to be a bit fanatical. Whatever cleaning you may do is strictly based on whether or not they want to 'accept' it. There's no 'official' guidelines, especially considering the different types of veganism. If you're worried about cross-contamination of fatty oils (...


4

You can either substitute the bechamel or the ragu: Bechamel Use soy or almond milk and vegan butter Ideas: http://www.onegreenplanet.org/vegan-food/how-to-make-classic-sauces-vegan/ https://realfood.tesco.com/recipes/dairy-free-bechamel-sauce.html Ragu Simple.. just use vegetarian mince: https://www.quorn.co.uk/products/meat-free-mince ...


4

You can use most margarines, which are pareve. Most margarines contain lecithin to emulsify the (vegetable) oils with water to yield a butter-like texture. The lecithin should serve the same purpose as the emulsifiers found in butter. Kosher cooks have long used margarine as a general substitute for butter. I have not tested it in a pan sauce, but I would ...


4

Latke translates into 'little oily thing', so really it's anything small and fried. Potatoes are a new world crop, and the celebration of oil as a part of Hanukkah goes back much further. The original latkes were actually made with cheese But most people today associate them with any sort of shredded, fried vegetables. Most anything starchy will work (...


4

I'm not expert on Kosher thing, but what about using chicken schmaltz?


3

The great Jewish thinker Maimonides argued that (basically) all the laws of forbidden foods exist for health/scientific/safety reasons, and he laid out the connections. In Guide for the Perplexed 3:48 he writes the following: I maintain that the food which is forbidden by the Law is unwholesome. There is nothing among the forbidden kinds of food whose ...


3

Mushrooms for flavour. Plenty tomato in the ragu sauce. Pep it up with some basil and other herbs. There is no reason that a vegetarian lasagna shouldn't taste good - though it won't taste like a meat lasagna - it can still be satisfying. Tofu, though nutritionally good, tastes of little (similar to the pasta) and will make for a dull lasagna. In fact, tofu ...


3

Interesting question and I'll try to give an answer to the questions that you state explicitly. Blood is edible and is eaten in loads of countries. Black sausage comes to mind. However, blood tends to coagulate rather fast and meat needs a fair amount of time to mature. I'm guessing that leaving blood in the meat will give the meat dark spots that are not ...


3

for those wanting to buy a wonder pot, like me. i found this today. wonder pot is being sold in israel (jerusalem and tel aviv), sharing the link. http://www.carine.co.il/htmls/page_683.aspx?c0=13572&bsp=13800 i plan to have one shipped to singapore before december. will keep you posted how this turns out.


3

Milk (and, I guess as an extension, cream and cheese) is included for richness, pork because a mix of pork and beef is somewhat lighter than beef alone, and pancetta for flavour. None of these ingredients is essential and a "basic" Bolognese sauce would work just fine without all of them.


3

In the original italian recipe of "Ragù alla bolognese", pork is optional, there is just beef mince simmered with red wine until reduced, some vegetables (carrot, onion and celery), tomato sauce, and absolutely no compulsory dairy products (cheese is added on personal taste when the dish is served). this one seems perfect, notice: olive oil or butter ...


3

When I was growing up, my family had a tradition of having bolognese once a week. We liked putting cheese on top and my mother is vegetarian, so for both of these reasons we used soy "mince". I don't know how easy it is for you to find but I often see both dried and "fresh" varieties in my supermarket. It's often sold under the name "textured vegetable ...


3

I'd personally just go with a mushroom ragu. You can find plenty of recipes online, such as from Serious Eats or the New York Times. I can't remember if fish counts as "meat" for Kosher rules, so you may need to avoid recipes that call for fish sauce or Worcestershire sauce.


3

You can use any fat at all in a roux, including animal fats like suet and schmaltz. With a roux, all you're doing is toasting the flour to get rid of the raw flavor, and using the fat to make sure it doesn't clump up. The older, less sophisticated beurre manie technique involves kneading flour into cold butter, throwing knobs of it into your boiling liquid, ...


3

Those are two different processes. Unfortunately English language don't have two words for the outcome and they are both called "pickles". Usually Polish pickles "kiszony" should be made with: cucumbers, dill, fresh horseradish, garlic and salt. No vinegar. Kosher pickles, called in polish "korniszony", are made with brine that contain vinegar. I assume ...


2

Regarding halaal meat, the quality varies. In South Africa, particularly the inland provinces, halal beef sold by Muslim-owned butcheries and supermarkets is of relatively poor quality, but due to limited choices, Muslims didn't know any better. In South Africa at least, well-done beef was almost universally consumed by the Muslim community, until recently, ...


2

In regard to the Wonder Pot, this item is made in Israel and it is imported to the USA by Weiss Gifts Ltd. in Brooklyn NY Can be purchase by there site at www.weissjudaica.com Hear is the direct link to this Wonder Pot: http://www.weissjudaica.com/system/scripts/results_big.cgi?product=100


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