Hot answers tagged

69

"Cooking wine" is unfortunately ubiquitous on US mega-mart shelves. It is notoriously bad. I mean really, really notoriously bad. It starts bad, and then they add obscene amounts of salt so that it can be sold on grocery store shelves for $6. As pointed out by @Malvolio, "salted wine is supposed to be disgusting! Many US states have special licensing ...


39

It's not just American supermarkets that rarely carry mutton, this situation is similar across the Anglosphere, and I suspect most Western countries too (or at least those without a strong mutton culture). The reason is largely economic. Mutton is expensive and not as tasty as lamb. First, the immediate reason is that nobody really eats mutton anymore. Yes, ...


38

Your pan was too hot. Cast iron pans can get ripping hot (which is good) and retain heat very well (which is also good). But, on the other hand, if you have a thicker piece of meat and want medium doneness, you should not start with maximum heat, depending on your stove. If your pan is really that hot that the outside looks burned while the inside is still ...


24

Imitating the flavor of the lamb itself will probably be much more difficult (if not impossible) than manipulating the other ingredients in the dish. That way, the brain is tricked into thinking it is eating lamb, when it is not. For example, let's say you want to make a meatless lamb biryani. If you can get the texture of a meatless lamb substitute close ...


19

As has been mentioned, most of the lamb in the US is imported -- and mutton is imported, too There's a giant consumer of mutton in western Kentucky around Owensboro. (it's the local standard for barbecue, and past reports put Owensboro near the top of the list for both for per capita number of and spending at restaurants) As we now have a lot of smaller ...


19

It shouldn't be a problem. I would probably use a lower cooking temperature however. Start with a highish temperature of about 180-200C, to bring the meat out of the danger zone quickly, then lower it to 80-90 for a long slow cook. You will probably want to introduce some liquid to the pan to avoid it all drying out.


18

There's no benefit to putting the garlic in as slices from a flavor point of view, it's the cooking that brings the garlic flavor out. I've found that no matter how you do it the garlic flavor pretty much stays with the garlic rather than spreading throughout the meat - you don't get some even garlic hum throughout, instead you get parts with intense garlic ...


16

As confirmed in comments, the dish is khoresht mast. According to this recipe and this video, the main ingredients seem to be lamb or beef neck, yoghurt, sugar, saffron, rosewater, and garnishes of pistachios and barberries. The lamb/beef is simmered with onion and turmeric then mashed and blended, and mixed with an egg yolk, yoghurt, and sugar. This is ...


15

The very short answer: You had bad temperature control. You have to leave meat on the skillet until the proper internal temperature is reached. If the outside burns before that, then you used too high heat. Also, if you have a very thick steak, you may need to use more involved methods. A longer answer: It is absolutely normal that cast iron behaves very ...


9

The simplest way to remove kidney cores is to cut the kidneys in half (horizontally) then snip the cores out with a pair of sharp scissors. With practice this can be done in two or three quick cuts.


9

My understanding is that no cooking method helps with BSE and that seems to be backed up by a U.S. Department of Agriculture fact sheet that states: Current scientific research indicates that cooking will not kill the BSE agent However having a look around at a few references like BSE in sheep from the UK department of Agriculture and Rural Development ...


9

Another option is to freeze wine - buy a bottle, use what you need this time and freeze the rest in containers of about a cup. Red doesn't freeze completely solid so keep the containers the right way up in the freezer. This is also good if you've drunk some of a bottle and know you won't finish it. Some cheap drinking wine is good for cooking, such as ...


8

I always save all my scraps to make stock. I'm not sure what you would do with lamb stock, but it would probably make a good sauce to use on lamb. The fat that renders out is also useful for future cooking of whatever it came from (duck fat for duck confit, for example). I just throw all the scraps into a slow cooker with celery, carrot, and onion (...


7

I'd suggest buying something like Franzia -- a box of wine with a bladder so that air can't get in. They last in the fridge for a few months, so you can use it as a supply for cooking wine for a while. And its OK (not great) to drink as well. As it has been noted time and time again, you can cook with wine that you wouldn't enjoy drinking just fine. Ideally ...


6

You cannot "cook off the calories". Also, caramelized yogurt is still yogurt. Some of the lactose in your yogurt surely got converted to something else, but 1) there is no way to estimate how much got converted and how much remained, and 2) it is impossible to say what the result was (it could have been another sugar). So a conservative estimation is that ...


5

Why are you taking it off. This is the most delicious part of the rack of lamb. It is a complete ruination of a beautiful cut. Whoever invented frenching of lamb racks and cutlets should go back to the basics of what gives lamb its flavour. I am hare pressed to find a traditional old fashioned cut style of a lamb cutlet. It is usually a stick of bone ...


5

According to Britannica: The meat of sheep 6 to 10 weeks old is usually sold as baby lamb, and spring lamb is from sheep of five to six months.


5

You should be able to combine as many as you want. Pay attention to the fat content in each meat, as that can make a big difference in the yield as well as the texture. However, even if you make a fairly significant change (for example, from 20% fat to 10% fat), it still won't be wrong or inedible, just different. (Although, I wouldn't recommend trying ...


5

I disagree with the accepted answer, as the question states it was a dessert, which does not apply to Khoresht-e Mast. I am Iranian myself and to me, it sounds more like a local form of Haleem. It's a sweet dish (dessert), which has creamy consistency, is always prepared with meat and thus, results in an as you called it "rope-y" paste. It's ...


5

That temperature is fine, but is never, ever going to produce “fall off the bone” in one hour. That requires hydrolysis of collagen into gelatin, which takes significantly longer. It’s possible the chef was describing how he finished the lamb, after a longer (and possibly wetter) cook at a lower temperature. Don’t worry too much about losing liquid. That is ...


4

You're asking two questions here. (See Elendil's answer for how to remove the cores.) Chewy connective tissues can be made tender by slow cooking. You will never be able to soften them up by pan-frying. If you want tender kidneys, and are interested in trying a different cooking method, you could make something like steak and kidney stew. (Disclaimer: I've ...


4

Hooves are generally not eaten directly but make great soup. If you Google 'trotter soup', you will find recipes from many different culinary traditions, most of them middle-eastern or from the Indian sub-continent. This page has some typical recipes: http://www.khanapakana.com/recipe-search/s/trotter Although trotter generally means pig's hooves in the ...


4

There are no "secret ingredients" in making soft and juicy kebab. Much like sausage, meatballs, or meatloaf, this ground meat based food relies on salt, fat, and proper cooking to remain juicy. I recommend Chapter 5 of J. Kenji Lopez-Alt's The Food Lab for an explanation of how these elements interact (though I do not believe the book has a kebab recipe). ...


4

As I am sure you know, different species have different flavors...beef tastes like beef...chicken tastes like chicken...and, well, pork tastes like pork. Further, when animals are butchered, we find that different parts of the same animal have different flavors. Further still, the animals diet before slaughter greatly impacts the flavor we perceive. ...


4

Food safety rules are written around the ways bacteria reproduce, not around the chefs' convenience. There is no difference in the speed of getting unsafe between different types of meat (or any other type of non-shelf-stable food). Yes, the lamb is also meant to be defrosted in the fridge. And cooking from frozen is indeed not an option. So yes, you are ...


4

As someone who also hates fatty meat, with lamb honestly it doesn't matter. It's very fatty meat, all cuts. My local supermarket's "low fat" lamb is still 20% fat. They don't tell you what the rest is. The trick is to cook it for a long time - 4 hours or so, or all day in a slow cooker. The fat doesn't magically disappear, but it gets rendered ...


4

There is an extremely easy solution to this problem if you want to invest a little bit of money: sous vide. Cook to just under the desired temp (or just follow the guide for the cut on serious eats or other good cooking site) and sear the heck out of it on the cast iron like you did using a high smoke point oil (peanut or similar). It's cooking for dummies,...


4

Heat moves slowly, and takes a while to travel into the middle your food. If your pan is very hot, the surface of your food gets heated so quickly that it burns before enough heat has got into the middle of your food. The skill in cooking on a pan is finding the right combination of temperature and time, where the middle has time to heat up to a desired ...


3

We used to raise sheep. I never liked lamb, but mutton was good. You mentioned your skills with separating meat from fat. Render the fat down and use it to make pie crust. Cut, sear and brown the meat, and use it to make lamb pot pie. This way, all of the "discards" are used up, and supper is delicious!


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