54

It is mostly a fancy way of saying that they are combining flavors. There are no solid, physical layers involved anywhere. Still, there is a reason why the "layering" metaphor is more apt than simply saying "combining". Flavor is mostly about aroma, which leads to two aspects of "layering". First, aroma is not perceived all at ...


24

In addition to the accepted answer: This is called Fresh Yeast in English. There are two other types of yeast commonly available in the English speaking world, called instant (bread machine) yeast and active dry yeast. Both of these last two are more commonly used as they keep very well for extended periods of time. Fresh yeast is basically a cake of yeast ...


16

It's often called fresh yeast in English.


12

I ran a quick search on ebay Images. Looks like a refrigerator tray is a shallow glass or enameled dish. I saw a few plastic ones, also from the 60s-70s.


11

If you could link the video with the quote in question that would be helpful. In the case of onion and garlic from your example, I would say "layering flavor" is just a way of saying "bring out the best flavor(s) from each ingredient by appropriately adding them in a certain order". Onions have quite a bit of moisture in them that needs ...


10

There is a fantastically wide range of pizza styles available in the US. The traditional American "fast food" pizza, such as one would get from Domino's or Pizza Hut, has a fairly thick, doughy crust, but thin-crust pizzas are nearly as widely available, and have become more common over the past two decades. In the US, it's less common for pizzas ...


10

You don't need the "uncleaned" word there at all. All of the qualitative amounts are just approximates, so "(about 1/4 onion)" works fine.


9

If you really want to do this, "untrimmed" is sufficient. For example: 60 g celery (approx 80 g untrimmed) would tell someone how much to use and how much to buy. "As bought" wouldn't work - I bought ready-trimmed leeks the other day, because the untrimmed ones, while much cheaper, came in a huge pack. Honestly though, just being clear ...


7

Two factors: Leavening: pizza crust is generally made with a leavened, yeasted dough, that has risen for a hour or more before rolling out. Crackers are generally made with a "short" dough, which contains no leavening at all or only a tiny amount of chemical leavening. Even crackers that are made with a yeasted dough (e.g. sourdough crackers) are ...


7

"Une poêle" (pronounced "pwal") is a frying pan, so we have the verb "poêler"(pronounced "pwale") which means to cook in the pan. So we use the word "poêlée" (pronounced "pwale") for anything cooked in a pan, with a more or less reasonable amount of fat, generally at a medium to high heat. In the ...


6

For freezing ice cream or other confections in a refrigerator’s freezer area, a refrigerator tray was a rectangular, shallow, open container. The ice cube tray (often provided with the refrigerator) began, around the mid-to-late thirties, to be fitted with a removable divider so that it doubled as the refrigerator tray. Ice cube trays with removable dividers ...


5

TL;DR: Based on early British and cooks' resources, "a small cup" was probably equivalent to "a teacup", which is 1/4 pint, or around 142ml. However, there are a lot of caveats to that. First, I cannot tell you for certain whether "a small cup" in any particular recipe was a specific measurement. Until the very late 19th ...


5

To me, this seems to be an issue of what we call 'prototypal classification' (sometimes called 'fuzzy classification' when it's computers doing the sorting). Basically, you have two groupings (pizza crust and cracker), and you have to decide how to sort a specific item (the crust on a thin crust pizza). It's important to consider that crackers and pizza ...


4

I also believe a stem pan is what we would call a 'tube pan' or 'bundt pan', as in Joe's answer. I have, however, found a few links to back me up. Here is a comment on a Chowhound question suggesting a recipe using a stem pan. When asked what a stem pan is, the poster replied: "basically, a stem pan is what they now call a tube pan". This recipe ...


4

This seems to be more of a linguistic question to me. It depends on who you ask. In the region where I live: not necessarily, both the American style and French crêpe style pancakes are sometimes called "блин" and "блинчики" (little pancakes). But for a lot of people it's only the French thin ones. And they call the other one "...


3

Try searching for "laminated base pot", alternatively 'sandwich' or 'encapsulated'. Other terms tend to be more trade markey, multiclad etc. You could always buy a cheap pot & an even cheaper simmer ring instead ;)


3

Since we get variations of this question so often, I made a picture to clear it up at a glance. Your understanding is pretty much correct. I would only add that the special "way" of converting wheat to powder is simply leaving coarser particles (for semolina) and smaller particles (for "standard" flour). The question of "when to use ...


3

Your understanding is mostly correct. Durum flour is sometimes used for bread, generally mixed with softer flour. (Pasta is also sometimes made from a mix of hard and soft flours.) It's unusual (in my personal experience) to find soft wheat semolina labeled as "semolina". More commonly it's labeled as "rava", "farina", or "...


3

The pizze on your photos look to me quite near to what is known as New York style in the US, rather flat, but leavened and with some toppings. NY style is also also the US style that comes closest to the Italian original. If you are interested in an even flatter pizza St. Louis style might be for you.


3

In the USA the definition of pizza is wide. Different regions in the US have different styles of pizza. As a result, Americans have pioneered an entire lexicon to help them navigate the churning sea that is popular pizza culture. Looking at your pictures, I would describe your pizzas as thin-crust pizza with ham and cheese. I wish I knew more about you so I ...


3

They wouldn't use the name "cordial" because it has a different meaning in the US. Over here, "cordial" is some sort of flavored alcohol, usually with a sort of connotation of something that rich people drink after dinner or as something refreshing that some rich people on a southern plantation might drink. (so it's not only alcoholic, ...


2

Almost certainly not. They look and sound a lot like cherry peppers, aka pimiento peppers, but are apparently a distinct cultivar. With the exception of commercially important (“Maris Piper”) or widely renowned (“Honeycrisp”) names, cultivars tend to be quite local in penetration, and are unlikely to have translations in other languages. You’d probably do ...


2

Although I agree with the general vaguely toroidal shape of the individual compartments in Steve Chambers' answer, I don't believe those 'baked donut' pans existed in the 1950s, or at the very least didn't have sufficient distribution to assume that people would have them. (as is still true today). I would recommend using a standard tube pan, a bundt pan, ...


2

In German, this is also call fresh yeast (or baking yeast). It is mostly sold as 42g cubes (as shown in your image). Historicaly, most peaple bought it in a bakery, where a 500g portion was subdivided into 12 portions (41.66g). Once supermarkets started, the 42g size was retained since that amount was needed for a 750g loaf of bread. It should be used within ...


1

At stores around where I live (California), this type of yeast is referred to this as wet yeast and the other granulated instant yeast as dry yeast.


1

Yes, it is the same. It refers to milk which has been left out until it has gone sour with whatever wild bacteria it has managed to catch, be they pathogenic, healthy, or neutral. It curdles a bit and changes in smell and taste. If you find a person or author who makes a difference, then you have discovered either some regionally restricted distinction which ...


1

Often, cooking onions over low heat so they turn translucent without browning would be sweating as was already mentioned, but the name would technically mean cooking them until they gave up their liquid. With a little bit of water in the pan, and the lid on, I'd be inclined to call it steaming, but if you then cooked it without the lid some to get rid of the ...


1

Without the water, I'd call it 'sweating'. With the water & lid, they're going to come out a bit like like fairground hotdog onions… not really like caramelised. Fine for Spanish Tortilla (or hot dogs), not so great if you need that Maillard-like reaction. If you don't use the water, or the lid, you can slowly caramelise onions with little supervision, ...


1

This annoyed me. the difficulty of the search not the question! ;-) Though I finally did find something here. And in the spirit of avoiding link-only answers a screencap of the page in question in case it goes away: I am by no means 100% on this as being the Stem Pan you are looking for but depending on the recipe it might be close. BTW I found this linked ...


1

It's confusing. What does the 60 grams of celery has to do with 1 stalk. Don't mix and match units, weights (grams) , volumes (1 cup) , sizes (1 large apple) in describing your recipe. Use one unit for all of your ingredients, even liquid (100 grams water is 100 grams)


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