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25

I've never used ricotta or any soft cheese on my lasagne - I wonder if it is an Italian American convention. I use bechamel sauce, mozarella and parmesan, and it works very well.


19

Time...lasagna needs to allowed to rest for a while before serving. At least an hour. If you try to serve it straight out of the oven it will slide all over on you. Time will allow the cheeses and other filling to firm a bit to give you the distinct 'layers' that you want to see out of a traditional lasagna. I would even recommend making your lasagna the day ...


16

It's true. I've done it quite a few times, before the 'no boil' packaged varieties were commonly available (if they even existed ... this was ~15 years ago) Unfortunately, I haven't done it for many years, so I'm quite out of practice. (found out I had a problem with dairy, so lasagne isn't something I make anymore) From what I remember, you needed to ...


12

I'd say freeze nearly all of them uncooked and bake when ready. That way they go through only one cooking and maintain the fresh lasagna taste/feel. The sauce and and the cheese will freeze ok. Mozzarella is a pretty sensitive cheese and once it's been baked, it's not going to hold as well when thawed and re-warmed. In my experience it gets gummy and the ...


10

The general process of making lasagna is: Cook the other ingredients - brown the meat in a pan (maybe with seasonings); if you're using fresh tomatoes, cook them; if you're using canned tomatoes, drain the extra liquid out. The important thing is that everything is cooked, and there's not too much liquid left, since that'd make the lasagna messy at the end. ...


10

Traditionally, you start with a layer of pasta at the bottom, then go ragu-bechamel-lasagne-ragu-bechamel-lasagne, and finish with a layer of bechamel directly on top of the last pasta layer, followed by a liberal covering of grated parmesan. It is also common to add a sprinkling of parmesan on top of the bechamel in each layer. Ratios are subjective but ...


8

Rather than freezing it after baking, I would assemble the lasagna and freeze it today and then bake it on Sunday. It is rather difficult to reheat a whole baked lasagna from frozen without getting soggy noodles.


8

Assuming TVP is what you used... it is essentially a byproduct of the production of tofu, and as such is largely tasteless on its own. Generally, to use it you first rehydrate it with a 1:1-1.5 ratio of TVP to liquid. The liquid can be pretty much anything, from water, to broth, mustard, ketchup, liquid smoke, etc. Very similar to tofu, it will absorb the ...


6

I hate to be a party pooper but no, it generally doesn't work right to use pasta in a baked dish without boiling first. Even just made fresh pasta needs a quick bath in boiling water. That's because cooking the pasta is about more than just making it tender, it's about hydrating and plumping each grain of flour. Even if your sauce is very wet, you're not ...


6

Use any fresh cheese like fior di latte, bocconcini, or fresh mozzarella with a little bit of fresh parmesan. It depends on the region, some people use non cheese sauces like béchamel and even some use orange cheddar. If you like a fresh and subtle tasting lasagna without the gritty texture of ricotta, a nice mix of fior di latte and fresh mozzarella ...


6

Lasagne is the Italian name for the noodles used in a lasagna casserole. So it would be technically incorrect to use it for a casserole made with a different type of noodles. And I'm not aware of any other use of lasagne noodles, so while you will probably have to call your soup "lasagne soup" if it contains them, and Italians will also use the term "lasagne ...


5

For one nondairy option you can use a puree of cooked garbanzo beans (chickpeas), lemon juice, salt, a bit of cornstarch, and garlic if desired. I like this for lasagnas as it doesn't overpower the dish with a cheesy flavor and lets the vegetable flavors really come through. Another option is to soak cashews for a few hours, then puree them with lemon ...


5

In Italy with Pasticcio we are usually referring to other kind of pasta rather than the lasagna noodle. The classic lasagna and pasticcio are made with ragù and besciamella, but there are lots of different types. For example I simply love the white lasagna with artichokes! Disclaimer: as almost the totally of the italian dishes this differs from region to ...


5

Anything airtight is fine. If the sheets will fit in a Ziploc, that would be perfect. Another option that would certainly be big enough is a bread bag, well sealed. If you still have the box the pasta came in, you can put the bag inside the box to give the pasta a small measure of protection against breakage. I checked with Still Tasty and they didn't have ...


5

Gordon says "white sauce", which is a simpler term for bechamel-based sauces and is quite common when making lasagna. Yet the stuff that gets stirred in the bowl looks somewhat "fluffier" than classic bechamel and when it's piped has a "raggedness" that plain bechamel doesn't have, but smoother that pure ricotta. My conclusion: it's hard to say for certain,...


5

Layer them between wax paper, parchment paper or microwave cling film.


4

I have cooked Lasagna, cooled it overnight in the refrigerator, cut the Lasagna in portions, vacuum sealed and froze the portions. I have received all positive feedback on the Lasagna.


4

There is no way to answer this. An exact calculation is next to impossible, anyway. An educated guess would have to take into account the temperature at which the lasagna is frozen, the setting you choose for your oven, the lasagna thickness, and the temperature at which you want to eat it, and will still be way too inexact, something like "between 45 and 75 ...


4

I make lasagna without boiling the noodles all the time! I have also made other noodle casseroles without first cooking the noodles. If your sauce is "wet" enough or if you add a little extra water to your sauce, it cooks fine! Most of the dishes I make, bake for about an hour and that is plenty for plumped up noodles with the same texture as boiled ahead. I ...


4

Cream Cheese is a great substitute. I have a friend with similar distaste to cottage cheese so we just use cream cheese, cheddar and mozzarella.


4

I agree with the texture issue. I had luck this week using real - not light - sour cream instead of ricotta. I combined provolone, mozzarella and the sour cream togther before adding the additional ingredients.


4

The version of lasagna that I grew up making was a collection of layers of various things. These layers were (at minimum) - sauce; pasta noodles; a mixture of white, soft cheese and other things; and other cheeses, usually mozzarella. This means that there are actually two cheese layers - one shredded, the other creamy. Here's a recipe I've grabbed from Food ...


4

It can be done (my mom does it every year for Christmas Eve). One thing to note, however -- you must boil the noodles before assembly -- it doesn't take long, maybe a minute or less (although, work in batches). This will prevent the noodles from turning into paste as they sit.


4

The simple answer is Yes. Of course you can use Portobello in your lasagna. You can dice them up and add them to your sauce, no problem at all. If that is the end product you want then you should make it that way but I would recommend slicing the Portobello into long thin slices. This will accentuate the lovely texture of the Portobello and you could add a ...


4

There are probably as many variations as there are people making it. It's probably a good idea to spread the ragu/red sauce a bit more evenly (I usually use a vegetarian ragu with lentils instead of the meat) I tend to make mine ragu/pasta/bechamel/pasta/ragu/pasta/bechamel/cheese but regard that as a matter of preference. I think this approach is common ...


3

It works. It tastes great. I've done numerous variations (All Veggie, White lasagna, etc.) for numerous dinners and no one has EVER known the difference. Including several Italian moms.


3

Just add an extra cup or so of water to the sauce. It comes out fine! I do it every time.


3

The thing about lasagna is that it really only needs to be heated through. All of the components (pasta, the sauce or sauces, the cheeses) are already cooked, or don't need to be cooked. So baking the whole lasagna heats it through and helps the flavors to meld. A 4" thickness not tremendously thicker than some more traditionally proportioned lasagnas, ...


3

Sounds like it could be the stripped down version of eggplant parm that, oddly enough, eschews the parm. I've had it a couple times in Southern Italy. Essentially, it's just layers of eggplant (with the moisture salted out in a colander, then the rounds dredged and fried), roma tomato passata, bocconcini (or any fresh mozzarella), basil leaves and sea salt. ...


3

I read through all the answers because I was out of my two favorites for lasagna -- ricotta and cauliflower. People interested in a great alternative to ricotta and cottage cheese, might try steamed, pureed cauliflower with some cream cheese stirred in while hot. I like this as "faux mashed potatoes" but it works well in lasagna, especially with slides of ...


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