12

Yes, all dishes should have flavour combinations, unless the dish consists of one single ingredient with no seasoning added, no oil added, it can't help but have them... even then a tomato for example has different flavour in the skin than it has in the pulp, than it has in the seeds, the inner leaves of a brussels sprouts will have less bitterness and more ...


8

Here's a little story about one successful day of palate training. I would think a similar exercise would work with all kinds of flavors. Just pick a handful of complementary flavors at a time. I went "back home" for a few months a couple of years ago. My dad came to me and asked my help with stir-fries. He wanted a better feel for the seasonings, how to ...


7

In my view this is pretty simple: make things you want to eat. As long as you cast your net wide enough as you look for recipe ideas, there will always be new things that you'd love to eat and will learn something from making. And as long as you want to eat the food, you'll be motivated enough to actually follow through and do it. Most of the time, this ...


6

To try take one small aspect of a really really broad topic... Try making the simplest salad in the world. 4 tomatoes, 1 onion. Chop into chunks & put in a bowl. A little salt & pepper & it's done. ..but wait - over there we have a choice of three fresh herbs we could add. Cilantro [coriander], flat-leaf parsley or basil. Add cilantro it's ...


6

No, not all dishes need to have flavours combinations. I would also say that it's not about "sweet and hot". IMHO it's more about particular flavour. Like when people drink wine and say "an earthy flavour with a note of pineapples and just a hint of pining for the fiords". Knowing the flavours means that you know what impact have different ingredients on the ...


3

In terms of just flavors, get to know each flavor on its own and then you'll be better equipped to combine them in ways that show you "understand flavor". Like colors to a painter, or sounds to a musician. When you taste things by themselves, you begin to develop an intuition as to what to add to what to have the outcome you're looking for. You want to be ...


3

I highly recommend the book, "Taste What You're Missing" by Barb Stuckey. She's a 'supertaster' and a professional taster, and her book includes suggestions for testing and improving taste bud tastes (salt, bitter, umami, etc.) at the end of each chapter. She also covers how we taste and why some of us taste things differently than others. Lots of great ...


2

Identifying a spice mix is hard, but you can get familiar enough with individual spices to narrow down the likely components, particularly the dominant spices in the mix. Since the dish in question is an Indian dish, good candidates would be cardamom, turmeric, cinnamon, garlic, black peppers, coriander, ginger, asafoetida (aka hing), and cayenne. If I'm ...


2

I alternate between whipping from the elbow and the shoulder (keeping my elbow slightly bent but not engaged). I also find that a slightly wider stance helps, distributing my weight equally to both legs, and rooting them firmly to the ground.


2

Serious Eats has some videos and what not in their Knife Skills section. The basic skills are covered in this article (slice, chop, rock chop). Other things to note include how to carve meats, how to cut herbs and tomatoes. America's Test Kitchen is pretty good as well, since they go slow and show things visually though they often don't narrate their ...


2

This is really going to depend on where you're headed. What direction do you want your next step to be in? I think generally knowledge like this will flow pretty organically: You know how to roast a chicken. Decide you want your chicken to be more moist. Learn how to braise a chicken. Decide you want to add more flavor to your braise. Learn how to make ...


2

If you really want to do this, you have to become a pedagogue first and train yourself in cooking second. This involves: Decide which specific skill you want to work on. Example: judge the doneness of pie crusts. Read the theory on the subject. Yes, there are books which explain how pie crusts work. Assess how far you are in your current skill. How ...


2

If you can I can roast a chicken, bake bread, improvise a dinner with what's in the fridge, etc...you've got some skills. So, the question becomes...what is your goal? You clearly can follow recipes, but want to get better. I would take several approaches to upping your game. First, search for techniques that you are less comfortable with. Find recipes ...


2

This is a difficult question to answer. I you can roast a chicken, try stewing... if you can fry, try poaching instead. You want to "step up your game" by learning new techniques or by learning new recipes? IMO, the penultimate are desserts and in particular pastries and confectioneries where techniques and measurements are really important. I would ...


1

My suggestion and how my husband and I got started with cooking was Cooks Illustrated (and their various other outlets like Americas Test Kitchen). By spending a year reading their articles and cooking their recipes, we learned a lot. We especially learned what to do and what not to do. Having those knowledge building blocks, we could take random recipes ...


1

The book "The 4-Hour Chef" covers this quite well. If you can get a copy, take a good look at Lesson 02: Scrambled Eggs and the flavor chart that follows. Testing different flavor combinations Scrambled eggs cooked in grapeseed oil are the best base for testing different flavor combinations. Grapeseed oil is neutral and makes sure that the oil doesn't add ...


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