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20

In his book On Food and Cooking, Harold McGee writes regarding beans and legumes: Plain salt at a concentration around 1% (10 g/L, or 2 teaspoons/qt) speeds cooking greatly, apparently because the sodium displaces magnesium from the cell-wall pectins and so makes them more easily dissolved. Baking soda at 0.5% (1 teaspoon/qt) can reduce the cooking ...


15

Frozen peas don't really need 'cooking' at all. The smaller they are the less they need, too; so anything labelled 'garden peas' or 'petit pois' really all you should do is drop them into boiling water, stir & give them maybe 1 minute maximum to heat. Drain & serve immediately. Don't wait for the water to return to the boil, assuming you have maybe ...


15

Assuming you don't cook in excess water then drain it away, there's not a difference in nutritional value here, you're just not comparing the same amount of rice. Raw, uncooked rice and beans are dry. When you cook them you add water. So if say you start with 100g of raw brown rice, you might end up with 330g of cooked brown rice. If you then take just 100g ...


8

Recipes for homemade wasabi peas involve soaking, boiling, and then low-temperature roasting (essentially dehydrating) the peas. Split peas are produced by simply drying the peas after they're harvested and then removing their skins. So the reason is that the snack peas are cooked while the split peas are essentially raw. The cooking process breaks down ...


6

In most countries string beans and green beans are exactly the same thing (see wikipedia's entry for green bean). They are both words used to refer to various unripe cultivars of the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris. The phrase string bean is older and dates back to when beans had a fibrous string down the pod that you could peal off. The first stringless bean ...


3

This is a standard task for pressure cooking. Normally, pressure cooking only saves you time. But with dried legumes and with potatoes, the result is typically creamier. Also, try switching your chickpea source if you only had your experience with one batch. Maybe you just happened to use a batch that was old, or grown under imperfect conditions. The ...


3

I have made chickpeas 2x recently and I was happy with them. What I did: 1: Rinse and then short soak - maybe 1 hour. 2: Long cook, covered - more like 12 hours. Chickpeas are little beasts. They can take it. 3: Salted cooking water, enough to cover chickpeas and not extra. I think cooking in salty water gets the salt thru and thru the bean. I ...


3

Your suspicion is correct about "far less mass than a chickpea" means you don't need to soak them as much. Chickpeas seem to need lots of soaking, but you don't have to soak lentils at all. I guess there are lots of kinds of lentils - the kind you have, the big ones with the skins on; the little peeled orange ones; the smaller dark colored ones with skins on,...


2

adzuki beans are quite sweet and used to make various desserts in Asia. I will note, however, that typically some form of sugar is also added in whatever dish is being prepared with them.


2

Peas are very sweet, especially when you eat them young. I don't think any others reach them, but I don't think I've tried every legume in the world, so it's possible. If the natural sweetness of legumes isn't sufficient for you, they take very well to added sugar.


2

It will be inconvenient, and you are likely to run into food safety problems. You would have to somehow make sure that they cool quickly enough after the first cook, and then heat up quickly enough for the second, and then cool again, that the total time in the danger zone is below 4 hours. The more practical thing is to soak them before cooking. You can ...


2

Italy here. Therefore I refer to dried lentils commonly found here. We used to "pre- treat" them like soaking in not cold water etc. This winter I got multiple packs of IGP (protected geographical identity) lentils from center of Italy. All packs suggest a very simple recipe typical there (it is basically lentils on croutons, to give you a preview of the ...


2

Perhaps the uncooked nutritional facts are dried split peas, and the cooked nutritional facts refer to these same peas cooked and reconstituted(re-hydrated). In this case the difference in nutrition could simply be the fact that the cooked peas in this case have the same serving size in both volume and weight, but the cooked variant has water added to it. So ...


2

Sodium chloride along with sugar is something that most manufacturers add to their products. Yes, rinsing will reduce the sodium content.


2

I've recently changed from tinned beans to dried in my mixed bean chilli, which I slow cook. White (cannellini or black eyed) beans stay fairly white if starting from tinned, but dried beans absorb some colour in soaking/cooking. This is reduced by soaking the kidney beans separately (it makes it easier to boil them hard to remove phytohemagglutinin) and ...


1

Just a thought, but I would suggest bypassing the dark black beans in the mix, (or soaking them separately), soaking them all overnight with just a dash of baking soda, rinse them thoroughly the following day, then steam in a pressure cooker. The colors leach into the cooking water, so steaming may preserve the color better. Without the pressure cooker ...


1

When processing legumes, you're adding oxygen which promotes bacteria growth. If you do that at lower temperatures, risks increase. Professional cooks have to bring the processed legumes back to a simmer before cooling them rapidly. So, in your home kitchen, process them while they're still hot.


1

Baking soda in your court bouillon only destroys the cell wall of your vegetables.


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