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16

Summary: Baking soda is mostly used to soften the beans faster and decrease cooking time by increasing pH. In some scenarios, it has been shown to aid in breaking down gas-causing sugars as well. Higher concentrations of baking soda and/or pressure cooking may be needed to make this latter effect significant. In most cases, an increased soaking time will ...


12

The actual action of soaking is what does most of the work. Most legumes have complex oligosaccharides, a type of complex sugar. Digestion of this complex sugar is what causes flatulence. By soaking your beans will help remove some of this excess sugar. Be sure you discard the soaking water. Though it is often said that adding baking soda helps I've yet ...


11

Lentils are good for a long time: Many claim that they stay safe "indefinitively". While that is clearly an exaggeration, properly stored lentils stay edible for years if you keep them well-sealed in a cool, dry and dark(-ish) place. Note that dry storage keeps mold at bay, closed jars protect from insect damage and cool temperatures slow trace amounts of ...


8

Preamble I will act in the interest of the OP and not close the question. I assume that my premise that the ratio doesn't matter (explained in the answer proper) is an established fact (at least I don't know of any source claiming the opposite). If we find a claim to the contrary, we will have to close the whole question, because it means that there is no ...


7

The recipe you linked to has lentils in it. Most recipes with lentils tell you to rinse and drain them, and also to pick over them for stones. Lentils are seeds from a plant, and during their harvest, it's not uncommon for small stones to be picked up as well. (Same goes for rice and any type of legume.) If you didn't check for any small stones before ...


7

In addition to what rheone said, I have noticed that using baking soda kind of softens food. A characteristica example of this is Use baking soda in green vegetables to keep them green after cooking is done which isn't the best solution because just a minute is enough to miss it and eat a soup instead of green vegetables. I have also noticed that if ...


7

They are not the same, there is a difference. Red lentils can be purchased whole or split. Most red varieties are skinless, those that do have skin don't appear very red. The measurements aren't going to be affected much, you'll get slightly more lentil in a cup of split lentils than a cup of whole lentils. The cooking time will be more dramatically ...


7

That just looks like some chaff from the harvesting and packaging process. It's good practice to always rinse beans before use. Lentils (organic or not) are no exception. Place in a bowl, fill with water and drain a couple of times. You should be good to go.


6

There is a couple of possible reasons I can think of. Over stirring the mixture could be breaking the rice down releasing more of the starches which will be making the sauce thicker and sticking the rice into clumps. Over cooked rice again making the rice overly sticky. Like you've mentioned, lack of liquid. If the sauce is getting far too thick the ...


6

Throw it away, it's spoiled and probably contains several colonies of foodborne illnesses. Sealing food isn't sufficient to stop it going off, you need to refrigerate it or freeze it.


5

It looks to me like you need umami. One easy, healthy thing you can add is powdered dried shiitake or porcini mushrooms. I just throw the dried mushrooms into a spice grinder, it's a powerful punch. EDIT: (SAJ14SAJ refers to the same concept, glutamates, in his answer)


4

Main ingredient for making a traditional dosa is rice. Rice can't be substituted. Although you can definitely reduce the amount of rice you are using. From what you've mentioned, you are using 3:1 rice to black lentil ratio. Using 2:1 rice to lentil ratio can also yield you similar batter without compromising the crispiness. I am assuming that you only use ...


4

Coriander, toasted cumin and grains of paradise all are spices. Grains of paradise being the more uncommon spice is similar to black peppercorn and was historically used as a substitute. They play the role of what spices commonly do which is flavor your lentil soup. Without it, it will just taste different than the recipe intended. If you cannot easily ...


4

Red lentils have no skin and are thus more absorbent. They literally sucked up the wee bit of water clinging to them along with their neighbors. Surface tension of the water couldn't be broken by the light-weight pulses. When crumbled apart, the brick doesn't feel pasty, no? Next time maybe pour lentils into water; either way, no harm to finished dish.


4

While I agree with some of the other answers that glutamates and nucleotides will help enhance the flavor of your dish, I don't think that's where you need to start. As is, your "health mash" barely has any flavor to enhance. I'd start instead by adding some aromatics. You'd be amazed how much more flavor you'll get if you just add some sauteed or ...


4

There's quite some bitter components in there: Fenugreek Nigella seeds Mustard seeds In general to balance bitterness, you either add salt, fat, or sugar. In yours case, maybe the addition of the mustard seeds pushed the bitterness just beyond what you like. So quite possibly you could also choose to reduce the amount of nigella seeds and fenugreek.


4

Yes, it's perfectly natural. Dust being rinsed off the outer surface of the lentils makes the water more viscous and helps to trap air in the form of small bubbles. In a strainer, the dust would be rinsed away, so you don't see the same effect; a spray nozzle especially adds a lot of turbulence, which causes more air to get trapped. You can get similar ...


4

I can only speak for UK supermarkets and you haven't said where you're from, but our lentils are clean as bought. A typical packet doesn't say to rinse them. With red lentils the only reaosn I can see for rinsing is to (slightly) reduce foaming; with Puy lentils and some others even that's not an issue and you may lose flavour. Some Indian recipes (...


3

There are three main things that are going to add or enhance the flavor of food. Salt, sugar, and glutimates. This is why the restaurant trio of salt, butter, and bacon is so effective at making things taste good. Cheese is another ingredient that brings most of these factors to the table, especially hard aged cheeses like Parmesan. Tomatoes also help ...


3

Almost certainly: lots of recipes online. I'd go with the 'porridge' or 'brown rice setting' if your cooker has it. Concensus on water ratio seems to be about same as for rice. Here's a question which lists More things you can cook in a rice cooker. With a quality cooker, you can also make baked beans and tasty onion soup.


3

You likely won't find a definitive answer out there, as there's a range of times for the lentils. To summarize an article from the Washington Post : Red, orange or yellow split lentils : 15 to 25 minutes Black beluga lentils : 20 to 25 minutes French du Puy lentils : 25 to 30 minutes Brown or green lentils : 30 to 40 minutes ... suggesting that you'd need ...


3

Your suspicion is correct about "far less mass than a chickpea" means you don't need to soak them as much. Chickpeas seem to need lots of soaking, but you don't have to soak lentils at all. I guess there are lots of kinds of lentils - the kind you have, the big ones with the skins on; the little peeled orange ones; the smaller dark colored ones with skins on,...


3

None. I have recently discovered that lentils do not require to be soaked prior cooking - and nor baking soda. I have already detailed this in an answer but I am not sure how to find it and link to it. I try and I will edit this. Another point is that the producers recipes were all clear about this : they recommend a minimal amount of salt in the cooking ...


3

In dal recipes I have made, the lentils and tempering are cooked separately, then combined later. They generally begin by toasting spices (careful, mustard pops, but that is what you want), then caramelizing thinly sliced onion in the spices. This brings out the sweetness of the onion, which can offset the bitterness of some of the spices. Once the ...


3

The biochemistry of the sprouting process is a little beyond me, but essentially the lentil converts stored energy (carbs) and protein into different proteins and fibre. The new proteins are quite useful to our own biochemistry, which is why sprouted lentils are considered "better" for you. It is the fibre, however, which causes the cooking time to be ...


2

Yes, they will take up some of the flavor of the stock. However: 1) the flavor will be subtle and hard to detect, especially if you are spicing the dal heavily (as you usually do with Indian food) 2) it's not that authentic, since Indian food is often vegetarian. Personally, I'd freeze the chicken stock and use it for something else. Or make Turkish ...


2

You should probably be soaking your lentils, but it depends on what type. Soaking expands and softens the lentils, which may be the effect if you're going for something like dal (yellow lentils). Lentils are high in phytates, which is an anti-nutritional - it's undigestible, and makes certain important minerals unabsorbable, like zinc, iron, calcium, and ...


2

As long as you're cooking on the stove, and probably stirring now and then, it doesn't exactly matter. You can add more water as needed until they're done, and measure what you add if you want to know for later. Since the ratio depends on your preference anyway - you can make anything from intact lentils to thick mashed lentils to lentil soup - this may be a ...


2

In surveying the web, I have found a variety of ratios from 1:2 to 1:4 by volume, and some which measure the toor dal by weight. I suspect some of the variation comes from the desired outcome (more or less soupy or poridgy), and whether or not the peas were pre-soaked. You can google "toor dal recipe without pressure cooker". This recipe for stove top ...


2

Yes, you can make dosa without rice! I am very health-conscious and one day tried making dosa without rice and it worked very well. Moreover, this doesn't even require fermentation. Just soak urad dal for couple of hours and grind it into a smooth paste. Make the batter as thin as regular dosa batter and enjoy :)


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