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15

Cooking lettuce is not as unusual as you think. It's kind of trendy to grill romaine, and iceberg lettuce is often cooked in Chinese cuisine, both in soups and stir-fries. There is a recipe for braised lettuce in Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking, and Lidia Bastianich, who specializes in Italian cuisine, recently did a stuffed and cooked ...


10

First of all, visual similarity has little to no importance in cooking. The way an item is handled depends on its texture, taste, flavor and interaction with other ingredients, and it is rare that these are connected among similar looking substances. When it happens, it is because they are related chemically, physically or biologically, not because they look ...


10

Much of the lettuce produced in the U.S. (e.g., iceberg) is effectively just crunchy water; they've bred so much of the taste out of it that it's used for texture and not for flavor. As cooking changes the texture, it then provides no contribution to the finished dish. For those recipes that do incorporate cooked lettuce, it tends to be: lettuce with a ...


9

It appears to be curly endive which is a lettuce. It is crisp and has a bitter flavor. Dole Know Your Lettuce


8

Yes it is still good. A lettuce that is kept outside (as in a farmer's market) will get wilted outer leaves, and the merchant will usually cut them off to make the heads nicer. Depending on the resulting size; if they cut out too much compared to other lettuces, I might ask for a lower price if sold by the unit. Personally, I will buy the lettuce with as ...


7

It is all due to storage lifetime. Lettuce is particularly perishable, compared to many other vegetables. You will get a considerably longer storage lifetime if it is refrigerated, rather than kept at room temperature. According to the USDA: Storage Conditions: Lettuce should be quickly cooled and maintained as close to 0 °C (32 °F) as possible with ...


7

Actually, aphids are totally edible. Depending on the plants they've been eating, they can range from slightly bitter to sweet. They could cause problems for your friend's remaining produce, though.


6

Brown lettuce may or may not be harmful to you, it depends on how far gone it is. We get a lot of questions on this forum asking about how to use ingredients which may be past their prime, and the advice is almost always not to try - mixing bad ingredients with good ingredients is almost always going to ruin your good ingredients and waste time and money. ...


5

Usually sellers hold the lettuce at room temperature during the hours of sale (to show to buyers) and place them in the refrigerator in the night. But attention. The supermarkets assemble the heads under plastic films (as said), which retain moisture, and daily keep them anyway in departments "fresh." The small vendors display the salads without protection, ...


4

The CDC's current advice as of April 20 2018 is quite simple: Do not buy or eat romaine lettuce at a grocery store or restaurant unless you can confirm it is not from the Yuma, Arizona, growing region. So, by the CDC's definition of safety, it's not safe if it's romaine possibly from the Yuma area. It has nothing to do with where you are; things get ...


4

Not sure if this is what you're looking for, but rather than trying to solve the problem, you can also just accept it. Bring it all to the table, and just make wraps as you eat them. It won't make it less messy, but it won't be much slower than eating pre-made wraps, and you'll be spending that time at the table with people instead of waiting to eat. To ...


4

I don't see any reason for it to be unsafe. However, I think you are wrong in assuming it will keep longer. I keep my lettuce in a closed container with water on the bottom, then a trivet, then the lettuce on the trivet, raised above the trivet, and the whole thing in the fridge. It keeps that way for weeks, not getting yellow, and not wilting too much. ...


3

The way mold grows is, a spore has to land somewhere moist, i.e. with at least a tiny amount of liquid water on it. So if you want to keep stuff like fresh berries in the fridge for many days, the best thing to do is not wash them right away, but instead leave them with a nice dry outer surface. That way, even though they're obviously full of wet juice ...


3

There are a bunch of great answers, but I think to me, the most important part is that most lettuces are just gross after you cook them. They go from crisp and refreshing to soft, mushy and sometimes stringy. Obviously, there are exceptions as others have mentioned but simply put, most of your salad lettuces just don't produce a nice cooked product.


3

Lettuce wraps are great further wrapped in rice paper, like for fresh rolls. It gives the wraps an additional layer of lovely texture and holds everything together, making eating them a whole lot less messy.


3

Yes, they can. Most people I know who make them for the first time just use too much filling. Traditional leaf-wrapped dishes (I know them under the Turkish word sarma) use a softened leaf (use pickled ones, or blanch fresh leaves) and a small amount of filling. Use one heaped tablespoon of filling on a 10 cm leaf, then wrap tightly. A demonstration with ...


2

Blanch the leaves briefly (I like cabbage over lettuce) Instead of minced (ground) meat use a decent sausage (whole meat). Prick the sausage skin well so it releases it's cooking juices into the cabbage Add sauce inside or outside the leaves (as you prefer), and bake as you like Quick and simple, little mess, tastes almost the same


2

Many salad packages contain freshness preservatives. That is, if the salad remains inside the original packaging, it will maintain its freshness. Regardless of the "best by" date, you should look for crispness of the greens. If the greens are crisp and smell fresh, they are good to go.


2

The brown spots you see are known as "russet spotting". This is a reaction which is believed to be caused by ethelyne gas emitted from citrus, such as apples, bananas, etc. Bottom line, the lettuce is completely safe to eat. It's certainly less visually appealing, but it is indeed safe to eat. For ideas on preventing russet spotting, check out the source ...


1

I have been keeping lettuce in the refrigerator with only the stems submerged in water for up to three weeks, taking off leaves as needed.


1

The safety of storing your lettuce submerged would depend on what type of bacteria are on it before storage. Anything from botulism to E coli could be hanging out in your wet salad. Both of these, and other, bacteria can survive refrigeration, submersion. E Coli can apparently survive highly acidic environments and fermentation. That said, it's the ...


1

I have a slow baked fish recipe that will be just perfect for you. I found it about 30 years ago in the New York Times Magazine. Cut the lettuce into julienne strips.Rinse it, shake but leave it wet. Place a bed of the lettuce it in a baking pan with sliced aromatics such as onion, shallot or garlic . Sprinkle the lettuce lightly with water or white ...


1

I used to work in produce and at first glance, I thought this was a Bok Choy Cabbage, but I also believe it's the Curly Endive Lettuce.


1

In Sicily we cook Roman lettuce, three ways that are my favourites are: 1. Take the whole leafs and boil in water for about 10 min with just a pinch of salt, drain (not completely) and serve as a side seasoned with just olive oil and a squeeze of lemon juice. 2. Same process of boiling though cut in to half and add little pasta towards the end, serve with ...


1

To the extent that tearing lettuce leaves more cells intact, if a salad is going to be served immediately, cutting is much better. The flavor of lettuce is in the juice, and cutting exposes the juices to the palate. There is nothing better that the sweet crunch of a rib of cut romaine lettuce. Torn lettuce tastes like paper by comparison.


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