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32

Liqueur is essentially a flavoured distilled spirit, with the important distinction of added sugar. Vermouth is not distilled, which is why it's referred to as a fortified wine. Flavoured vodkas usually have no added sugar, and so are not classed as liqueurs. Campari uses both distilled alcohol and sugar, and so is a liqueur. Have a flow chart: And a Venn ...


31

I wouldn't get too hung up on such a specific date. The date given is likely because of it's proximity to Midsummer's Day celebrations. In Italy and France the harvesting of green walnuts was traditionally tied with St. John's Day. The keys for harvesting green walnuts are: Bright green exterior as walnuts will turn yellow-ish as they ripen. Before the ...


18

I am afraid that you cannot do such a calculation in general. Degrees northern latitude is responsible for only a fraction of climate variation and walnut growing conditions. The author of the recipe didn't realize that his recipe relied on localized knowledge which other people will not have, and did not think to make it followable outside of his context. ...


14

Interesting concept. Since I never ever heard of using green walnuts for anything, I looked this up on the inter-webs, and lo & behold: https://www.lifeinabruzzo.com/magical-nocino-italian-green-walnut-liqueur/ I have no idea if this is anything close to what you are talking about, but on that page, there is a picture showing in pretty clear detail the ...


13

I've been making nocino, the infusion you're talking about, nearly every year for the last decade. Being at around 42˚N, I've wondered the same thing with regard to ripeness and location. After some experimentation, I continue to pick them in the night of the 23rd of June or morning of the 24th. (In my understanding that is the traditional time -- it's the ...


5

What you need is a refractometer, also known as a Brix meter. They can be quite inexpensive. Brix is essentially sucrose in baker's percentages, so 1 gram of sugar in 100 grams of water is 1 brix. You just need to choose a model that measures in the range you are interested in. Here are some on Amazon.


4

Add a splash to hot coffee for a fabulous liquor coffee, or use with cold brewed coffee in a Tiramisu dessert. Adding fat (i.e. mascarpone) and bitterness (i.e. coffee) or sourness (i.e. citrus suggested in first answer, or natural yoghurt) will help balance the sweetness. Also chilling sweet food and drink reduces their detectable sweetness - perhaps make ...


4

A good quality ($20 or so) sweet Port, Madeira, or Sherry could be lovely, and add a delicious flavor note of its own. Make sure it's something that tastes good by itself, with a flavor that appeals to you, complimenting a piece of cake. Note that these are so-called "fortified wines" — they are distilled to a higher alcohol content. Historically, this was ...


3

With your plans, you have encoutered some questions and problems. Let's tackle one after another: Alcohol boiling off Although often repeated and assumed due to the lower boiling point of alcohol vs. water, alcohol will not boil off completely. Even after a long boil not only traces, but a significant amount of alcohol remains. There is a question and a ...


3

You can, but it will have a very different effect to your fruitcake. The booziness of liquor is what makes the fruitcake taste the way it does. The fruitcake will probably still taste great, but it won't be what people expect from a fruitcake, which is the boozy mouth and nose feel of the cake.


3

This should be a comment but I have no reputation so I apologise if not much of help. Anyway if you're trying to accomplish something like a cream-based liqueur, sure you can use normal milk. I've prepared a Baileys-like liqueur with normal milk and uht crem and results were amazing! The lifetime of the product was unaffected by the use of a fresh product ...


2

Idea 1: Assuming the leaves are oxidizing: you could add an antioxidant. Vitamin C is handy and will scrounge up oxygen radicals. Crush up some pills and shake them in. It will make it a little sour too - ascorbic acid is vitamin c. Idea 2: deplete your alcohol solution of dissolved oxygen first. When you heat something to near boiling, the first wave ...


2

In the US, while UHT milk can be found, it is not the standard, widespread product generally used. Therefore, cream liqueur recipes simply call for cream or cream & milk, with no specification for UHT. What we consider 'normal' grocery store milk is homogenized and pasteurized or ultra-pasteurized. Ultra-pasteurized products are pretty much the same as ...


2

Aging time is one factor that you might consider, but the amount of fruit you're using, how it's prepared, and other factors can have an impact too. You're correct that the seeds and kernels of stone fruits can produce harmful substances, namely cyanide. More properly, they contain amygdalin, which is readily extracted from the kernels by ethanol. This ...


1

I've infused jalepenos for 1-2 weeks successfully, I don't know if there is an upper limit past that. The alcohol should prevent spoilage and the pH is too low for botulism to be a concern. Infusing them whole is ok. There will be a lot more heat if you leave in the seeds and membranes. Cooking them will change the flavor. Only do this if you want the ...


1

Distilled alcohol doesn't spoil, and in high enough concentrations (20% or above) will preserve food. If your grandma's homemade hooch is strong enough (and it isn't adulterated with any harmful chemicals) it will not have any foodborne illnesses in it and should be safe to drink. A quick test for alcohol content is to see if it starts on fire at room ...


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