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21

My knowledge about the phenomenon itself is limited but I did see it mentioned in "Modernist Cuisine" (Nathan Myhrvold, p. 147) Many recipes for foie gras, liver, sweetbreads, and other offal include a soaking step before cooking. For kidneys, this step serves a very simple purpose: to remove any trace of the animal's bodily fluids. Recipes often call ...


7

You have a few options to lower their explosiveness: Pierce the skin, like you do before baking a potato. Lower your frying temperature can help a bit, but you'll probably always need to use a temperature higher than the boiling point to get any kind of crisping action. Dehydrate the liver a bit before frying. You could use a dehydrator, a low-and-slow oven ...


5

Yes, you can safely soak it at room temperature, but why would you? There's no reason not to refrigerate. Meat is safe for about 2 hours in the temperature danger zone of 40F/4C to 140F/60C. Beyond that, it should be cooked or refrigerated. So, if you do decide to soak at room temperature you should cook or chill it promptly.


4

Of course you can freeze meat. If it would be unsafe, your local supermarked wouldn't be allowed to sell it. What you have to keep in mind when freezing your own meat: Storage time is limited, for guidelines see here or here. Freezing does nor remove bacteria, mold and other "nasties", but stops them from multiplying. Rule of thumb: What's on the meat when ...


4

I usually let the livers soak overnight in milk. Then i pat dry and fry with onions. even if i cook them for longer they will still stay moist. You can flavour the milk if you want. I usually put thyme and garlic.


3

I can't speak to health reasons (and we don't answer health related questions on SA) but, as for taste, rinsing chicken livers can be quite important. I always rinse and check the chicken livers well to be sure that there are no gallbladders (or pieces) left attached to the liver. The gallbladder contains bile and even a small piece can ruin the taste of ...


3

OMG this turned out great! Really good. I ended up using half of the liver called for in the recipe, otherwise I followed it to the letter. There is a richness to the sauce that I don't think it would have had if I had skipped the liver entirely, but I can't taste it. For a bit of extra protection from toxic nastiness, I did carefully clean the liver and I ...


2

I hate to waste food and I always have too much liver. I use beef broth or bouillon so the liver does not dry out or get tough. To reheat: Slice up fresh onions if you don't have enough left over onion. Slice cooked liver on the diagonal into 1/2" thick strips. In saucepan, make up enough beef broth or bouillon to completely cover liver in pan (about 3 ...


2

With liver I'd say there isn't much point in reheating it as it'll cook in about the same time if you cut it thinly. You could eat it cold but whether you'd like it is a matter of personal taste.


2

You may consider blanching the liver if it still has the tough outer membrane intact. Ice water on the side, boil water to cover the liver, dip for a moment or two, then plunge into ice bath to stop cooking. Loosen and peel membrane, slice, soak in milk for as long as you can, a few minutes to a few hours. Dry the slices and let them rest while you grill ...


2

A few finely diced mushrooms or olives can add a lot of extra flavour, Worcester Sauce is of course an option too for quickly adding flavour. There are quite a few 'proper' recipes which recommend fried and blended celery but I've never found it to work that well, it can add body if thinly sliced but doesn't do much flavour wise. Personally I'd add a good ...


2

Milk is very close to neutral pH, hardly worth calling acidic, but it does contain lots of calcium, and is a buffering agent, meaning it will tend to pull strong acids or bases closer to it's own pH. Any time you soak meat in fluid with different salt content, it is going to cause fluid to flow in and out of the meat, this is the same way brining a turkey ...


2

The milk has caeisin wich pulls out blood and impurties as well as some metallic elements. Same stands for tapia as it pulls out some of the muddy and overpowering stony elements. I have put in 12 years in kitchens and have seen milk used in many soaking applications mostly for cleansing methods.


2

Let me do a breakdown of the typical ingredients of liverwurst ("Leberwurst") roughly based on food laws in Germany (aka liverwurst country): roughly 10% - 30% (sometimes up to 40%) liver: mostly pork because it's cheapest, using partly veal or poultry is more expensive but tastewise no big difference. muscle meat and bacon, again typically pork, but beef, ...


2

Poaching a foie gras torchon is not necessary. Essentially, the liver is a cured charcuterie before the poaching step would occur. From this Serious Eats method of preparation: To Cook or Not To Cook? At this stage, the most classical of recipes will have you poach your torchon in a bath of sub-simmering hot water for about 20 minutes, long enough ...


2

As you note, the recipe I was able to locate for Nando's spicy chicken livers (with tagliatelle pasta) did the trick. While that version calls for veg (marrow/zucchini) and pasta, here are the directions for the chicken liver and sauce. Heat 5 Tablespoons of olive oil or butter over a medium heat. Add the chicken livers and sauté for 4 minutes. Add one cup ...


1

I haven't tried this myself, but I have a suggestion. You could slice the liver as you might when frying it. Then put butter/oil and a single layer of the meat in a glass pan. Cover with a paper towel. Microwave only a few seconds at a time and always keep an eye on it. It could explode or burn. Rotate the meat a few times. You could also try boiling it, but ...


1

A few items that when added up result is a lack of bitterness: Though bile is produced in the liver, it ends up being stored in the gall bladder for both humans and cows. I wouldn't expect the liver to be full of bile as a result. One of the main functions of the gall bladder is to concentrate the bile by removing water and electrolytes from and making it, ...


1

If the liver scares you, please take a look at this Ragù Bolognese recipe. This is the "original" (registered on 17 oct 1982 by italian kitchen academy) recipe and does not involve liver.


1

I looked at five recipes, none of them called for the foie gras to be chopped. You have already cleaned the liver, and have a different method chosen to form the ballotines, but I really liked these instructional photos from The Renaissance Girl Cooks describing the method from The Squire (a restaurant with two Michelin stars), and thought that later users ...


1

The flavor doesn't come from one thing, but from the sum of its parts. In the recipe you posted you have many different ingredients, for instance sage, mace, shallots, and brandy. All these add complexity and depth, and combine to make the flavor. As for what is it that makes you personally like pate there's no possible way to answer that on this forum, ...


1

I have done the milk thing and never noticed any real difference in either the texture or the flavor. Maybe its just me. What I did notice is "how" you cook the liver. A Hot pan so when the liver hits it it shrinks right now. Flip it and cook the other side a short time then out and into an already prepared bacon and onion mix to simmer for awhile followed ...


1

After reading different sources on how to reheat liver, I tried by placing liver and onion in foil wrap, placed in 350 F oven for about 3 to 5 minutes. It came out very decent, not hot, not cold, but edible.


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