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30

Don't throw it away. Worst case you use up the mystery sweetener on yourself, and use a new pack of Stevia for your wife and anything you share. That's what I recommend if you're not convinced by my solution or don't have sensitive kitchen scales. At room temperature, sucrose (normal sugar) is very soluble in water: about 200 g of sugar will dissolve ...


27

Ants don't care about artificial sweeteners. Make two piles: one of your mystery sweet stuff and one of real sugar (as a control to make sure there are ants around). Maybe moisten them some or make syrup. Leave them outside somewhere you see ants. Then check them later. Carbohydrates (sugar) are fuel for all animals. Stevia has no food value. Ants ...


22

The flavor / odor notes you're experiencing are probably sulfuric compounds. Cruciferous vegetables like broccoli and cauliflower contain sulfiric compounds that are released on cooking. That's why the stir-fried crisp-tender broccoli tastes so different from the limp overcooked olive green florets. Similar to how spicy salsa fresca grows ever spicier after ...


21

This answer is specific to OP's situation, and doesn't apply for the general case where "getting it wrong" has fewer consequences. is there any surefire way to tell if this is Stevia and not sugar? No, there is no surefire way you can tell. Within the bounds of an everyday kitchen, and lay-person knowledge; there is no method by which you will be 100% ...


14

Have you tried spiralized zucchini, yellow squash or carrots? I use this: Once they're cut I just blanch them and then toss into any pasta recipe, like so:


14

The classic example would be spaghetti squash. It has the unique property that when you cook it, it can be pulled apart into long, thin, pasta-like strands. You can then sauce it or use it in a manner analogous to pasta, but its nutritional profile is far more similar to squash, because, well, it is squash.


13

Cauliflower is from the same botanical family as mustard and horseradish. They all produce sulfuric compounds in different amounts. The odor of the sharper family members such as mustard is primarily based on those compounds. My best guess is that your cauliflower already had some less-pungent sulfuric compounds present. When sitting, they either oxidized ...


12

Wow, do not throw it away, especially if you have a scale or yeast handy. There are 2 easy methods to determine whether the unknown sweetener is sugar or not. Try fermenting unknown sweetener with yeast With the exception of lactose, yeast can feed on all "real" sugars, or at least the ones you'd normally keep in your kitchen. On the other hand, in all of ...


10

Cows, goat, soy, almond, and coconut milk have around the same carbohydrate levels, so there is not enough difference to make the effort to rework recipes etc. Also coconut milk has more than 20% fat compared to milk having 1% to 5%. A normal human body can use fats as efficiently as sugars, so total energy of coconut milk will be very high Approximate ...


10

I think the best solution is to avoid pre-mixing or pre-saucing anything. If you bring out a big bowl of pasta tossed (or topped) with sauce, the only way to get sauce is to eat pasta. Imagine instead you bring out: a big bowl of pasta, perhaps tossed with a little oil to keep it from sticking a bowl of brown rice marinara sauce alfredo sauce olive-oil-...


9

Though it's true that yeast will consume some of the carbs to produce byproducts (such as CO2) that affect the flavor and texture of the bread, the amount that these microorganisms will consume is tiny compared to the amount of carbs that exist in the bread. It won't be a noticeable amount from a human nutrition perspective.


9

OK, this one will not be very practical, but I was inspired by one of the answers who claimed that there is no surefire way to tell But there is. Sugar is optically active. A linearly polarized light beam will rotate while traveling through sugar. There is an instrument that measures this called polarimeter and, actually, its main use in business is to ...


8

Preamble I will act in the interest of the OP and not close the question. I assume that my premise that the ratio doesn't matter (explained in the answer proper) is an established fact (at least I don't know of any source claiming the opposite). If we find a claim to the contrary, we will have to close the whole question, because it means that there is no ...


8

You can buy prepackaged low-carb pasta (or gluten free pasta) if you want to make a quick dish. For a healthier option, you can make zucchini noodles. All you need for this is a lot of zucchini and a mandolin or spiral slicer. "Zoodles" are so easy to make and delicious with pasta sauce and fresh cheese! I make these a lot and oftentimes add caramelized ...


7

The primary reason coconut flour recipes (especially a high hydration recipe like pancakes) end up tasting like eggs is because they are primarily eggs with very little flour. Coconut flour is extremely absorbent, which means two things: For the same amount of liquid, you need less coconut flour compared to other flours like flaxseed meal, almond flour, ...


7

"High" gluten flour has, at most 15% gluten. "Indian" white flour, or maida has 7.5%. If you manage to pull it off, you basically end up with what's essentially a pan fried slab of mock meat, rather than a bread - basically seitan. You typically add gluten to flour to modify its characteristics - the only way you're going to be able to make naan that ...


6

Your recipe has no gluten in it. Baked goods without gluten tend to have a crumbly texture; muffin batter usually contains at least some wheat flour, which contributes gluten toward the muffin's structure. The Kitchn has a good blog post about using vital wheat gluten, which can be added to a recipe that is in need of a more bread-like structure (assuming no ...


6

This is a rather general question, and I will try to answer it in a general manner. First, the total amount of carbohydrates will not change, or maybe there will be a neglible reduction due to things like burning tiny bits of surface carbohydrates to carbon, or cleaning the vegetables. Second, the ratio of all carbohydrates to everything else can easily ...


5

Shirataki noodles are quite the rage, although I've never actually tried them. I understand that they smell fishy when you first open the package, but that goes away. They claim to be made of naturally water soluble fiber with no fat, sugar, or starch. Supposedly some varieties have zero net carbs and zero calories. They have been recommended for Italian ...


5

It depends a lot on what you expect. I wouldn't call it a mess. The result will be edible, and will have a similar flavor to a brownie. The texture will be very different from a brownie. It will be dry and dense. Personally, I wouldn't eat it. First, the fat plays important roles in baked goods besides taste. I am surprised to see a recipe which uses ...


5

Yes, they would be processed under pressure. What I'm not seeing in your ingredient list are any thickeners or binding agents, which definitely works against creating density in the final product. Now, I've never made protein bars (because I'm a fat kid and don't eat them (not that I'm actually fat)), but I have made granola bars, and in granola you use a ...


5

Are you only using pork belly? No added fat? Even though pork belly has a high fat content, my experience is that sausages require even more. Add some ground, or finely diced, pork fatback and see if it makes a difference.


5

They were literally thrown away, physically removed from the whole. The basic steps of making tofu are: Make soy milk out of the soy beans. The residue after straining the milk, called okara, is not used in the tofu. It contains lots of carbohydrates, especially insoluble fibre. Curdle the soy milk with epsom salt. Separate the curds from the whey and ...


5

I hate answering my own question, but after a month I did (finally) find a pseudo-answer that works for Stevia. I've not yet tried it for any other sweeteners. Melt into fat and freeze it For example, the recipe I use for cookies needs four (4) tablespoons of melted butter. I started by melting two tablespoons in butter (well, 1TB butter and 1TB ...


5

A soubise is a classic french onion-based sauce. Really it is just slow cooked onions with a bechamel added. Of course, bechamel has flour in it to thicken. However, I have seen recipes where the bechamel is replaced with heavy cream. For example, here, onion, cream, and vadouvan spice are blended together to make a flour-free soubise. It would make a ...


5

Put a pinch of each into a pan and heat it. Real sugar will turn into brown and sticky caramel. Sweetener won't.


4

This suggests gelatin as a binding agent. You could try increasing your salt content for binding, but this could hurt the flavor. For moisture you could experiment with adding a little red wine to keep them moist. Wine has "carbohydrates" but they aren't processed in the same way as regular carbs. This ingredient is used more in Italian sausages, though, ...


4

I've had this happen with tortillas. Generally it's moisture or humidity that will cause them to stick. Try putting the entire stack in a low-temp oven (unwrapped and uncovered) for a few minutes to dry them out. You should be able to separate them easily. At that point you could either put them in separate bags, or stick a sheet of waxed paper/plastic wrap ...


4

If you make the proposed recipe it will taste nothing like a brownie, will probably taste pretty awful and dry. It won't save many calories either. Mixing in cabbage will also not work. I know the above recipe won't work, because I've made similar attempts myself. Sugar substitutes like Splenda usually produce a yucky result in brownie recipes. You need ...


4

Yes, an emulsifier is the way to go. Lecithine is an emulsifier, and will work. The downside is that it might impart a slight eggy taste, I don't know if this will be a problem for you. Also, it is a bit harder to store than the other emulsifiers, it tends to lump from ambient humidity. The more common emulsifiers for your case would be xanthan or guar gum....


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