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29

This is going to sound strange, but the 'low calorie oil' that you're looking for is water. What you do is you start the sausages cooking in a little bit of water (about 1 cm; 3/8"). The water will prevent the sauages from getting too hot too quickly, and the fat in them will start to render and leak out into the water. Once the water evaporates, you're ...


21

Gelatin and fat are different. Chill your stock. If a layer of fat solidifies at the surface, remove it. If you see no layer of solidified fat, you've probably eliminated as much as possible.


7

I wouldn't believe this - it sounds like marketing hype to me. Stainless steel consistently sticks unless you add at least some small amount of fat. That's true of All-Clad or any number of other brands and pans using 18/10 or 18/8 stainless steel. This copy says nothing about any special non-stick surfacing that would explain the claim; it's nothing more ...


5

There is no really good solution for this, as non-stick pans are by nature slick, and oils bead on them. My preferred solution is to use the right tool/technique for the job. Breaded items are normally meant to be fried in a puddle of oil at least half as high as the item (so it will have been submerged after flipping). If you insist on frying them in less ...


5

Thickening with starch or flour instead of roux can be quite acceptable if some other rich flavors are added. Here is where the calories can be traded in: Good low-fat broth for part of the liquid. celery root or coriander root are particularly good ing. for veggie broth Puree, in small amounts add body and flavor. soft cooked onion is particularly silky ...


5

Oils are fats and there's no such thing as "diet fat". The only way you can get less calories from fat is to eat less of it. The oils used in cooking sprays are the same as those in your bottles, sprays use pressure and chemical additives to create a mist that evenly deposits on a pan, coating it in a thin layer. A thin layer means you eat less, so lower ...


4

The journal article lists the chemicals they used, the concentrations tested, and the suppliers they purchased them from (https://academic.oup.com/chemse/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/chemse/bjv036). Contact the manufacturer and ask for pricing. Their website will likely give quantities and item numbers. Make sure it is food grade. I’ve been able to buy small ...


4

While movie theaters do often add flavoring agents (e.g. Flavacol) during cooking, that's not all they do for seasoning— they also use popcorn salt which is simply extremely finely ground plain salt. Morton, among other salt companies, package it for sale in grocery stores. It sticks perfectly to popcorn with absolutely no liquid or fat whatsoever. If you ...


3

I don't know how Asian dough or Polish dough suggested in the comments will work but I might give it a try. I have found the following online. Low-Fat Dumplings Ingredients 150g / 5½ oz self-raising flour pinch salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley or thyme (depending on preference) 1 egg yolk, lightly beaten 1 tsp ...


2

I use a little spritzer bottle that I fill with Braggs aminos or nama shoyu or coconut enzymes. Just spay a little on as it comes out of the popper. It provided a tad of moisture to then sprinkle on other spices that stick. No fat!


2

You can't make a roux without fat (butter in this case) and you can't make béchamel without roux. Quite the quandary. You might try bringing some milk to near-boil, thickening it with flour. Once thickened, take it off the heat and thin with wine. Add herbs et al. I suspect, however, that you won't like it without the butter. Pardon my pontificating, but ...


2

According to Duke University: Believe it or not, there's a standard of identity for mayo. Mayonnaise, as defined by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration must contain vinegar, egg or egg yolks, and at least 65% oil by weight. It may contain spices and natural seasonings except turmeric and saffron, since yellow color might suggest added egg yolk. ...


2

An alternative to Joe's method is to use no frying medium at all, just start the sausages by themselves over lower heat. Once enough of their fat has rendered out into the pan, your can turn it up a bit. This will take longer but also give you a bit more fond to work with once the sausages are cooked, if for example you're making tomato sauce in the pan ...


2

@Rumtscho has some good points, especially around using non-non-stick pans. A cast iron frying pan would work better for that. However, if you don't have one my suggestion for pan-frying something like breaded fish would be to pull the fish through the oil puddle with your fingers or tongs as you put it in and then let the fish sit on the non-oily part of ...


2

If you can find a copy, Graham Kerr's "Minimax Cookbook" has guidance and several recipes for low-fat baking. He used to be the galloping gourmet, and produced recipes with outrageous amounts of fat, sugar, and so on. Then his wife had a stroke and he re-examined how he cooks in order to be able to meet her dietary requirements while not losing flavor, ...


2

what you are looking for does not exist. a way to make the food [low fat] for him without losing flavor This is impossible. Fat is very important in baking for both taste and texture. Assuming that your husband's fat/salt/sugar diet means that the substitute has to contain less fat per unit of weight than shortening, you will be losing lots of flavor ...


2

It believe is more a question of temperature than technique. Low and slow typically renders more fat. When I want a maximum amount of fat rendered out I place thinly sliced bacon in a pan and cover with cold water. I then place over medium-high until the water has evaporated and then some depending on how crispy I want the bacon to be.


1

As it cools, the fat and water will separate into two layers, with the fat on top. If there is no/little fat layer, then there simply isn't any fat. The thickness that seems fatty is just gelatin that has set like jelly. That's a good thing as it means the stock was well made.


1

Chris, I was surfing for recipes this morning and ran across a link on a Polish site for what Google Tranlate calls Silesian Dumplings. But for the fat in the egg yolk, there is no other fat https://crummblle.wordpress.com/2011/10/20/kluski-slaskie-z-miesem-i-sosem/ These may fill your requirements potatoes cooked and whipped, cooled down potato ...


1

Yes, using lowfat cream cheese could be the reason. Most of the fat content in cream cheese is saturated. Using the right amount of saturated fat in fillings or baking helps them to set or solidify better. If you use Lowfat cream cheese which has about half the fat of regular cream cheese, you are lessening from the solidifying agent of the formula.


1

One thing you can try to increase the fluffiness of your pancakes is to separate the egg whites from the yolks so that you can incorporate more air into the batter. Gently combine all off the ingredients except the whites, whip the whites to stiff peaks, and then gently fold the whites into the rest of the batter.


1

I think non-stick pans are good for one-off use, quick recipes that don't require a lot of even heat (because they'll have movement). Frying a breaded fish seems reasonable for a non-stick. But if you're reusing the oil between heats, then that's a bad idea. Consider fudging with your dredge techniques to get a better cling when you do your fish and chips. A ...


1

A good quality nonstick saucier pan is a good choice to brown onions without oil. Start with a very fresh onion that has lots of it's own juice. Older dryer onions are not a good choice for this method. Preheat the pan on medium. Let the onions sit untouched for a couple minutes on medium heat so that they may sear. Stir and let them sit again for a couple ...


1

I just posted a recipe for something similar! Check it out. I have much more peanut butter than sugar, about a 5:3 ratio, while most recipes you see have more sugar. In addition, I use less butter, about 1/4 of the peanut butter by weight. I also use some cream cheese for flavor and to replace some of the butter. The vanilla will add flavor but not much ...


1

I add applesauce in place of oil. The replacement is equal.


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