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17

As you probably know, making Macarons is tough, especially making them at home. But it is possible as I have been able to create perfect macarons in my home kitchen, using Italian and french meringue. The Italian meringue always got me better results. There are many reasons why your macarons don't come out like expected. First off, the meringue. It should ...


16

Take a look at this photo: The feet are the ruffles on the edges.


10

You had too much air in your batter. This isn't a result of beating to much, but rather insufficient macaronage after folding in the sugar and almonds. The excess air expands in the oven and creates a hollow shell that then collapses. The macaronage is really the trickiest thing about macarons - it is very hard to convey in recipes exactly what the texture ...


10

The meringue should be glossy and form soft peaks. When you take your whisk out of the meringue it should look like this: The French say that when you take the whisk out of the meringue, it has to look a bit like a bird's beak, hence the way the meringue forms a soft peak slightly pointing downwards. But to be honest, I don't believe that is you problem. I ...


8

A macaron (won't go into the dispute over macaron or macaroon) is a semi-foam/liquid composed of a meringue folded into tant-pour-tant (half and half of icing sugar and ground almonds). When they are baked the top shell layer of the macaron cooks and it means that the macaron can no longer expand and must rise up, this forms a frilled ruffle or foot.


6

Yeah, don't. Either don't use guides at all (you shouldn't need them after the third or so batch), or use good ones, like this. Macarons are difficult and fussy anyway - you don't need to add to the fussiness. Eventually, you'll either thank me or curse the very idea of those wretched cookies. I've tried to remove paper templates from under the silpat. It's ...


5

Yes, you can whip egg whites (or whipped cream, or....) by hand. There are a few things you need: a reasonably large bowl a good, sturdy whisk, again not too small proper technique a good amount of ellbow grease patience It will typically take longer than when using a mixer (for beginners, I've seen pros that could keep up with any measly old mixer, ...


5

The need to leave macarons to form a skin is debatable, but if you feel it's necessary, put them uncovered in the fridge, which will dry them out nicely. Be careful that there's nothing else in there with a strong smell that may taint the macarons, however.


4

You say: Also I have an electric mixer in which I usually whisk eggs for a cake. Why not use it? There's nothing special about an electric egg beater, really. You'll find it much less strenuous than hand-whisking, even if it's a hand mixer rather than a stand mixer.


4

When I've seen people make macarons in the past, they drop the tray onto the work surface once or twice (from a relatively low height) before they leave them to sit before going in the oven. If you haven't been doing this with yours you might want to try adding this step to your process as I believe it could help with your problems.


4

The process I follow for making macarons is: Whisk egg whites until foamy Add caster sugar gradually and whisk until very stiff, adding any colouring near the end. Stir in almond meal and icing/confectioners sugar (there is no need to fold gently) Use a dough scraper to mix the batter in a back and forth motion until the batter falls like a ribbon off the ...


4

As a macaron fanatic, eating that is, and collector of recipes and cookbooks, I referred to Les Petits Macarons by Kathryn Gordon and Anne E. McBride and to Pierre Hermé Macaron and, you are correct, the difference is the meringue, itself: French, Italian, or Swiss. The French method produces the correct texture and taste,light and delicate, for the French ...


3

First, it's easy to fix your oven. Grab a spare tray and put it right next to the heating element. This will diffuse the heat and even it out. Since you have 2 elements, maybe switch one off or use 2 trays? To test it, grab another tray, dust it with flour and put it in the middle of the oven. Bake until the flour browns. 100C for 20 minutes or something. ...


3

And also try letting the moisture out of the oven by using a wooden spoon or chop stick to hold the oven door.


3

according to Adriano Zumbo the trick to thinning the mixture comes after you have folded all your sieved ingredients into your stiff peaked egg white: using an electric beater give the mixture a pulse to loosen it. Check it & pulse again if needed. It will only take a few pulses to loosen. The consistency you are trying to achieve is still very thick but ...


3

Almond flour and almond meal are pretty much interchangeable terms. What you are essentially looking for is the finest ground almonds you can get hold of. I buy ground almonds (because they're easily obtained) and sift them to get the finest bits. This isn't very economical (90g of fine almonds from a 150g bag, usually) but you can use the coarser bits in ...


3

Here I'm assuming that you mean macaroons as in the French patisserie macarons rather than the simpler coconut or almond based macaroons. In any case almond meal and almond flour are essentially the same thing, both are almonds ground into a fine (or not so much in your case) 'flour' or 'powder'. Apparently, almond flour is made from 'blanched' (almonds ...


3

The text on p.62: "Once a macaron is finished, its flavor is good, but it will get better. This is why we freeze the macarons (it also makes them chewier and more fun to eat). .... It sounds like they're freezing the completed macaroon, filling and all.


3

I don't know about the Bouchon recipe, but my wife just attended a macaroon making class at Mille Feuille last weekend. They recommended refrigerating the whole macaroon overnight (and up to a week), not freezing. The idea is the moisture from the filling migrates to the cookies. This causes the cookie to be moist on the inside, but still have a firm and ...


3

I can tell you that yes, every part of the process, including precise measurement, has really low error tolerance. Do something a bit wrong, and you end up with an edible cookie, which does not resemble a macaron in shape or texture. My explanation for the different ratios you found is: the really important thing about the ratio is the final moisture ...


3

Ah, macarons. If it's not one thing, it's another. Uneven pied usually indicate that the oven was too hot. You should use an oven thermometer to determine the exact temperature of your oven, because oven dials themselves straight up lie. I once had an oven that was always 20C over the temperature on the dial. If you get a thermometer (or have one) and this ...


3

I work at a charcuterie but we are partnered with a professional baker who provides us with macarons to sell in our store. From your picture, it looks like the tops of your macarons have deflated. I wouldn't decrease your temperature, but instead increase it. Our most common problem was deflation and often times our temperature wasn't high enough in the ...


3

When the macaron batter sits on the sheet tray prior to being baked, the outside dries a bit and becomes solid and inflexible (at least relative to the rest of the batter). During the baking process, the batter inside is heated, which causes some of the water to turn to steam and expand. This forces the interior batter to expand. It lifts the dried ...


3

A dacquoise isn't so much baked as it is dried. Usually this is done for an hour or more at a temperature below 300F. If you have problems with the top drying too quickly and leaving the bottom unset, you can get a simple spray bottle and mist the top with water toward the beginning of the baking time to slow it down. Also, I notice that the picture is using ...


3

As well as the answer I gave in the question @Catija referred to in her comment, I suspect you are not beating your meringue enough. In total you should be beating the initial meringue for a good ten or eleven minutes. There are a lot of myths and complications around macarons. The Internet would have you believe that you must used aged egg whites from ...


3

Mine used to fail, but now they always turn out well. The climate doesn't matter. But you have to keep them away from water. I use following measurements: 35 g almond meal 50 g icing sugar 30 g egg white 30 g sugar Beat the egg whites with the sugar until stiff on low speed, and have patience, as beating on high doesn't stabilize them. Next, fold the ...


3

As this answer was originally downvoted for not being helpful answering all 3 questions in that one single question separately: a. Powdered sugar contains additives to ensure it doesn't re-crystallize into a big hard rock of sugar under normal atmospheric conditions and only using that one would give the macarons a powdery taste. b. Using granulated sugar ...


2

I suspect high humidity, or overbeating. If they are not getting dull and dry, they are not ready to go in the oven. If you touch it and it wiggles around a bit, leave it to dry longer. It sounds like humidity shouldn't be a problem, as you have already tried letting them dry out longer, but if it is, here are some ideas- Allow the macaroons to dry for ...


2

I don't make macarons often, and I really hate hunting around for fillings that work, so I use a very comprehensive list of ideas from Sortrachen. There are 20 recipes there, so it's not often I have to do a lot of searching. When I'm refreshing my mind as to the types of alternatives I could use, I head to Indulge with Mimi. As you can see if you check it ...


2

As well as the previous answers and if not already doing so, try using beet sugar (e.g. Silver Spoon in UK) rather than cane (e.g. Tate Lyle in UK) as beet sugar takes a little longer to Brown.


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