26

Use a bigger pan...or much less beef in the pan. Stop stirring. If you over crowd the pan, nothing will brown. It will steam, then braise because the water can't evaporate fast enough. Secondly, browning happens when an item remains in contact with the pan. So, stirring (unless you are using very high, wok-type temperature) will only defeat the ...


11

The Malliard reaction is quite complex. The article I linked defines it as many small, simultaneous chemical reactions that occur when proteins and sugars in and on your food are transformed by heat, producing new flavors, aromas, and colors. Oil does not necessarily need to be present, though, especially with regard to meats, fat is often there. If ...


8

While creative, this sounds like an especially poor idea, fraught with disaster. If the water turns into vapor at 100 C, it certainly would not transfer all that heat to the surrounding oil before leaving as steam, so I'd think you would never reach your desired oil temperatures if your goal was 100 C. Plus, as pointed out, in another answer, your food ...


6

If you get a lot of liquid from the meat, whether water or fat, removing some of it helps (spoon or pour). You don't need to add much fat to start with, just enough to stop it sticking. Cooking it in two batches can help (as can a bigger pan but only if you've got one and can deliver enough heat to it). I found that quickly breaking it up as soon as it was ...


6

You cannot "cook off the calories". Also, caramelized yogurt is still yogurt. Some of the lactose in your yogurt surely got converted to something else, but 1) there is no way to estimate how much got converted and how much remained, and 2) it is impossible to say what the result was (it could have been another sugar). So a conservative estimation is that ...


4

I agree with Joe: wet methods are generally good for preventing browning. The general policy is just to use temperatures which are as low as possible (while ensuring food safety and cooking until "done"). The other thing you want to avoid is very long cooking, since browning reactions can still occur if you cook something long enough at a low temperature. ...


4

I avoid dark-colored pans when I want to watch the color of a transparent or translucent mixture, such as cooking down fond or making caramel. (Situations where I need to make a split-second decision on when to stop cooking.) But I agree with GdD -- other things, like onions, are easy to watch in any color of pan.


4

The color of the interior of a pan isn't going to effect how food cooks, but you are right that a dark pan does contrast differently from a light or metal pan. My own experience with pans of many types is that color doesn't make any difference in the end result, I can tell if onions are browning on a dark cast iron pan just as well as a light ceramic coated ...


3

The need for contact is correct, but not really the issue here (else you could have pre-rubbed your potatoes). Both caramelization and Maillard reaction (which are different things) require rather high temperatures. The reason to use steaming as a technique is to not get up to these temperatures. In traditional steaming, you only get your food to 100°C. In a ...


3

Butter, specifically the milk components (sugars and proteins), turns brown and flavorful when cooked. Clarified butter doesn't have nearly the same effect. Fat on vegetables also slows evaporation while roasting, leaving more moisture in them. Oils will also get hotter, than evaporating water, which allows the vegetables brown more. A little bit of pure ...


3

So if you aren't concerned with cooking the meat until it's well done, you can continue with your current approach and evaporate all the water off, and then at that point turn the heat down to low or med-low and then let the beef sit in contact with the pan for a while to brown, then stir/flip it over. You can do this for as long as you want, eventually the ...


3

Any wet method of cooking will keep the temperature down to prevent browning (which includes caramelization ... but that isn't what actually happens with meats): steaming stewing braising poaching You don't need to brown meat before stewing or braising it -- you'll not develop the same flavors, but you're specifically trying to avoid those reactions. Fish ...


3

"Better" is a matter of opinion. Recipes for bolognese vary widely. Both methods are possible. Try it both ways, see which one you prefer. My practice is that the meat is not seared. Because of the nature of the recipe, I usually have a lot of meat, it would certainly take longer to sear it in batches, as opposed to dumping it all in with the sweated ...


3

It won't work. Water doesn't heat past 100C for one thing, which it too low for frying. Yes, if water boils it can impart a lot of energy due to the latent heat of boiling, but it's also going to want to vaporize, taking that energy with it. If you have the oil mixed with the water well then the oil comes with it and makes a huge mess. Also, the water is ...


3

When I do ground beef I usually add the ground beef in the shape it arrives where I am (slightly prismatic block). If I got it at the butcher's as a "pile" - I'll manipulate it slightly into something prismatic-like. I make sure to - on an experience basis - not add too much at once - I'll cut it in half and do it twice if I consider the total amount of beef ...


2

I actually saw a video on this recently. The reason that a lot of times ground beef doesn't get that browned look is because people take it out too early. You're supposed to let it cook until all the water has evaporated, then keep frying.


2

As well as the previous answers and if not already doing so, try using beet sugar (e.g. Silver Spoon in UK) rather than cane (e.g. Tate Lyle in UK) as beet sugar takes a little longer to Brown.


2

I love my Staub dutch oven. I don't feel that the black color of the enamel is a problem. You express this concern: I am worried that it would be very difficult to discern if it's starting to get burnt and turn black against the black interior of the cocotte. When I'm cooking, I'm not specifically making fond. The fond is a (desirable) side-effect of the ...


1

An alkaline environment does indeed speed flavor reactions (enzymatic and non-enzymatic). You can create an alkaline environment with the addition of baking soda, as you point out. However there is a balance here that you have to consider. At some point, the flavor of the baking soda will become unpleasant. So, the reason a pressure cooker is used in the ...


1

Oxygen will oxidize food, and oxidized food is a sign of degradation (brown bananas, brown apple ...) The only thing that comes to mind with oxygen, is its use in wine making. "In some wines, oxidation is used to create an effect or to ensure that the wine conforms to a particular style. In others, it’s a misstep that leads to a spoiled bottle. And yet ...


1

I'm pretty sure that I'll is not part of the Maillard reaction, which by definition happens between proteins and carbohydrates. But remember, browning is much more than only a Maillard reaction. I can confirm your observation that oil creates a better texture on roasted vegetables, and if I had to guess, I would say that it turns the roasting process ...


1

The answer to your question is "not really". As you mentioned in the question, Maillard reaction begins with carbohydrates and aminoacids. Meat is rich in aminoacids, so you don't need to add it to your recipe, it is already there. If you want to increase the Maillard reaction, you need to use a marinade that is rich in carbohydrates, the simpler the ...


1

Two things that encourage Maillard reactions are more heat and higher PH. Modernist cuisine has instructions to caramelise food in water using a pressure cooker and baking soda. Baking soda can taste soapy. You can also look to non-flavored antacid from the chemist and something used in asian noodle making called alkaline salts or lye water.


1

Here's my method. First, rub a well-seasoned cast iron pan with a light coat of oil and heat until the oil is just starting to smoke (400+ºF/204+ºC). Outside of the pan, break the ground beef up into large meatball size pieces, around 2 inches (5 cm) in diameter. Cook only a couple of these meatballs in the pan at a time. For instance, in my 10 inch cast ...


1

Flavor from the maillard reaction is considered very desirable, it's why we barbecue or fry rather than poach burgers, so browning the meat is "better". I have tried it both ways with a bolognese and chili, the flavor from the browning when it is done right is noticeable and my tasters all preferred it to the non-browned product. However, it's challenging ...


1

Bravetart wrote an article about this years ago, and noted that some coloring formulations don't play nicely with the oven. She suggests a few brands of gel pastes which work for her.


1

There are two types of browning, Maillard begins at around 140C and caramelisation at 180C. Maillard needs protein and sugar. Caramelization is a sugar only reaction. Both are exothermic (from memory, could be wrong) and once started, the reaction generated heat will accelerate the browning. Alkaline condition will also promote caramelization. So watch out ...


1

According to the culinary textbook 'On Cooking' (ISBN 978-0-13-715576-7) page 310, you want a temperature higher than 300°F. Studies have proven that flipping a steak every 30 seconds will have a better effect visually and flavour-wise.


1

Caramelization is the oxidation of sugar, a process used extensively in cooking for the resulting nutty flavor and brown color. Caramelization is a type of non-enzymatic browning reaction. As the process occurs, volatile chemicals are released producing the characteristic caramel flavor. The reaction involves the removal of water (as steam) and the break ...


1

You can try roasting in two steps: "Hot air roasting for almonds can be optimized by applying a two-step roasting process. The first step uses an intermediate temperature to stabilize the nut microstructure, and the second step uses a higher temperature to generate the desired flavor and color." Roast at a lower temperature for a longer period of time to ...


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