16

Since you specified not wanting any equipment other than a campfire and a stick, the best I can do is add one more piece of equipment you should be able to find anywhere (i.e., not have to carry with you): a rock. If you put a flat-topped rock just to the edge of your campfire, you should be able to place a graham cracker and slab of chocolate on top of it. ...


13

If you can, just get better marshmallow skewers/forks. If there are two prongs on the end, the marshmallow can't rotate. (And as long as you're not holding it at a really steep angle, they'll have a hard time sliding off the end too.) You can get fancy ones with nice handles, but just plain metal is fine. And it doesn't have to be super strong, so you can ...


11

After contacting Sterno with the same question, they indicated that the only safe gel product for direct food heating is marked “ethanol” on the canister. Those marked “methanol” are not meant for direct food heating.


11

I was recently on a canoe trip. We ran out of chocolate for the s'mores a couple nights before the end, so we substituted Nutella. No need to worry about melting, just spread it on the graham cracker. The resulting s'mores are much messier, though, since it all tends to squeeze out between the crackers. Overall, we judged it enough of a success that we'...


10

Are you using a metal skewer? Metal will carry heat much more than other materials such as wood, and will cause the inside of the marshmallow where it is skewered to soften and slide under the weight of the rest of the marshmallow. If you're aiming for a golden brown crust, then the key is to cook it quickly at just the right distance away so that the ...


8

Yes, there are two schools of marshmallow thought - with egg whites and without egg whites. Most recipes without egg whites have another difference that might better explain why your recipe acts so differently from what you see with commercial marshmallows. Egg white recipes use corn syrup as only a fraction of the weight of the sugar in the recipe - ...


8

Sterno suggests this use in multiple ways. On their site they have a pdf recipe for smores "indoors" that instructs you to roast the marshmallows over a can of Sterno. They also manufacture a Smores-n-more set that is really just a ceramic pot with a grill that you place a can of Sterno in to keep people from getting too close to the open flame. My guess is ...


7

Sterno is (roughly) alcohol mixed with gel. The same type of alcohol (ethanol mixed with enough methanol to make it poisonous) is commonly used in marine stoves because it's considered to be quite safe: it doesn't explode and it can be extinguished with water. Alcohol also burns cleanly and quite completely, so there are essentially no methanol molecules ...


6

Kraft's Jet-Puffed brand claims the following conversion factor: 1 Regular Marshmallow = 13 Mini Marshmallows That puts you at around 156 Mini Marshmallows for 12 Regulars.


6

Aquafaba Aquafaba (/ˌɑːkwəˈfɑːbə/) is the name for the viscous water in which legume seeds such as chickpeas have been cooked. Due to its ability to mimic functional properties of egg whites in cooking, aquafaba can be used as a direct replacement for them in some cases, including meringues and marshmallows. Its composition makes it especially ...


5

This nutrition data says that: 1 cup of miniature marshmallows weighs 50 grams, 10 miniature marshmallows weigh 7 grams, and 1 regular marshmallow weighs 7 grams 1:10 is a bit different from Sam Ley's answer; maybe Kraft is a little off average or this data is a little off. In any case, it's helpful in that it'd let you measure: 12 large ("regular") would ...


5

The nice thing about recipes that are using weight instead volume or numbers is that you can simply use scales to weigh the amount you need. If you absolutely don’t have a scale, I recommend you count the number of marshmallows in the pack, then determine how much one weighs. From there, it should be easy to calculate how many you need to get 500g or how ...


4

I'm gonna guess you just didn't go long enough. I make my own in the food processor all the time, but I turn it on high, go have a snack and come back in 10 minutes. It certainly does take quite some time.


4

There are two tricks that I know of: Stuff the chocolate in the middle of the marshmallow. More time in the fire will help it get melty. Roast your marshmallow long and slow so it's hot all the way through. It should practically fall off the stick. The hotter the marshmallow is, the more heat it can transfer to your chocolate. Let the whole s'more sit ...


4

I don't know about the safety standpoint, but from a texture standpoint -- don't refrigerate them. The problem is that they turn into an brick when cold -- rather than being a nice dessert, it's something that you have to gnaw at and fear that you're going to chip a tooth. You might be able to get around this by warming them back up before serving, but I'...


4

So from someone that has been making Rice Krispies Squares his whole life (Grandma taught me) Let's look at your typical ingredients: Rice Krispies: Does not need to be refrigerated Marshmallows: If form the bag they do not need to be refrigerated Butter: Does not need to be refrigerated Vanilla Extract: Does not need to be refrigerated So based on that ...


3

I have made marshmallows using Alton Brown's method; it works and is a lot of fun. If you don't form the individual marshmallows, but just swirl it into the ice cream while it's still a sticky mess, that should work for your swirl. There is even a video in that link. As ElendilTheTall mentioned in comments, you probably should reduce the amount of gelatin ...


3

There are 2 types of Sternos out there. There IS a type that burns something harmful for open-flame-to-food cooking. I believe it's an older way of making them though and that Sterno just makes the "safe" ones today. Just wanted to put this out there though. I own a Sterno can that is probably over 7 years old and it says to not eat food that touches the ...


3

I have tried adding marshmallows into my brownies, but I've learned that putting the bigger ones on top then drizzling with more brownie mix is the way to go. The marshmallows become gooey and melt on top and into the batter. They don't burn up and get nasty.


2

Use the tiny dried marshmallows used for hot chocolate drinks you can find them next to the cocoa on the baking isle. Here's a package on Amazon.


2

I think you're taking an overly complicated approach to this, I've had great success with a recipe from the DIY Cookbook from ATK, in their version, they use: confectioners’ sugar, cornstarch, unflavored gelatin, corn syrup (not high fructose), granulated sugar, salt, vanilla extract The only non-vegan ingredient in this manifestation is the gelatin, ...


2

The number of available thickeners is very large. Some work for high temperatures, others for low temperatures. For your filling I would use Iota Carageenan (Its used for thickening in many commercial ice cream products). It might be a bit difficult to find. Your second choice would be Xantham Gum. When using these thickeners be sure to hydrate correctly ...


2

Not recommended, sterno as it is known in the catering business is proven to be poisonous if consumed. Although the less fortunate have been known to drink the stuff to get drunk (another practice that I don't recommend). IMO the only purpose of a sterno or Choice Ethanol Gel Chafing Dish Fuel, as you put it, is for... exactly that: chafing dishes.


2

Like Jefromi said, having two prongs to hold the marshmallow will keep it from just spinning around the stick/skewer. You might want to look into getting a skewer like this: (I found this one on a site called outdoor roasting.com) Having two prongs really makes all the difference! Having it wrap around like a safety fork is kind of an added bonus, ...


2

Microwave the chocolate first in a microwaveable bowl, then heat the 'mellows and the crackers, before putting it all together. It's what I call "indoor s'mores".


2

Puffed Rice treats can be stored at room temperature in air tight containment (zip-top bag with no air in it), for 1 to 2 days without any ill effect. They keep longer than they last, if you get my drift.


2

You can refrigerate them. They turn to bricks, but if take them out of the fridge an hour before eating, they go back to a normal texture. They haven't lasted more than two days for me so I don't know how they will be for longer than that.


2

If you don't have marshmallows, egg or gelatin do you have brown sugar butter vanilla and half-and-half? If so you can make a simple caramel that can bind your crispy treats. There are a variety of similar recipes that might use plain sugar, milk. Do you have Honey, Molasses, or Karo? You will probably want to gently warm the stuff before mixing it with ...


1

The treat you are describing I believe is a meringue. These little guys are tricky to get right the first time, as it is all about how long you cook them for and how finely you whip the egg white mixture. What I like to do is add a bit of lemon zest on each one. Not only does it enhance the vanilla flavour (if you're using it), but it also serves to tell you ...


1

To replace the high fructose corn syrup, another syrup could be substituted without having adverse effects. I would recommend a agave syrup as it is functionally and flavorfully very close to HFCS. Fructose levels in agave syrup can vary from around 50% (very close to HFCS) up to 90% (which would be sweeter but functionally similar). You could also make an ...


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