42

Mayo, at its most basic, is egg yolk and oil, with a little vinegar, whipped into an emulsion. Aioli starts with oil and garlic, and sometimes vinegar or lemon. Some versions (French-Provençal, apparently) add egg yolk for an end result close to mayonnaise, but the yolk is not required. Hollandaise is a cooked sauce made from egg yolk and butter, ...


29

There has been thorough scientific research done on this question. The main problem with Alton Brown's recommendation is that his room temperature "rest" is not long enough, since the scientific literature recommends 24-72 hours at room temperature, depending on acid concentration. The most common acids used in mayonnaise recipes are acetic acid (vinegar)...


26

Welcome to the world of urban legends and old wives' tales. Handmade mayonnaise can be a fickle thing to create if you don't work within the laws of physics and chemistry and don't achieve the desired emulsion. So like with other tricky processes, many "rules" have developed, that are more myth than method. (I was even told once to "always stir counter-...


21

The difference in Mayonnaise is varied. For example, in the USA Hellman's and Best Foods Mayonnaise (Same company by the way and same product) add sugar to reduce the acidity. Regional tastes are also taken into account by the manufacturers. Hellman's mayo in Europe has different ingredient percentages than the same mayo uses for the American market. Many ...


17

I have to make both mayonnaise and aioli every day at my job. We sometimes do R&D on off days and we spent quite some time trying to imitate our favorite gourmet mayonnaise. I think that we were successful, here are some tips: Lemon juice comes closer to that crisp tartness that I taste in even cheaper mayonnaise. Try using the juice from lemons, limes, ...


13

OK, I did it. The rice vinegar was definitely the biggest difference. A pinch of MSG (Accent) sealed the deal. I found a recipe on Serious Eats. I tasted after every addition, saving the MSG for last. It wouldn't be as close having skipped anything that I used. I didn't have real hon-dashi or Japanese mustard, but I had some instant miso soup powder and ...


10

It's just rounding. The Hellman's nutrition matches the USDA generic mayonnaise nutrition very closely for the single serving size (1 tbsp, 13.8g), but the USDA one also includes amounts per 100g. It's 0.96g protein per 100g, and when scaled down to the serving size that's only 0.13g and gets rounded to 0.


8

Many cake batters call for mayonnaise. It makes for moister cakes. Using mayonnaise instead of its constituent ingredients adds convenience as well as extra emulsifiers. It is true that mayonnaise doesn't handle high heat on its own but it doesn't have to. It is part of a batter that will set. If you really don't trust the recipe- the mayonnaise can be ...


8

This is an old chef's tale. The important things when making the emulsion that is mayonnaise are that the oil is evenly dispersed and that it is broken into the smallest possible droplets. The direction of whisking has no effect on those factors. In fact, I find that a back-and-forth (zig-zag) whisking motion works best, especially when getting the ...


7

Regarding Romanian recipe... Actually in Romania people tend not to use raw yolks so much. Most often we eat relatively raw yolks just in fried eggs or soft boiled eggs. In most of recipes the yolks are cooked. Regarding mayonnaise there are three ways of preparing it: using just raw yolks (most simple), using raw and cooked yolks 50-50, and using just ...


7

There is no reason that they should be harmed in any way by their sojourn under refrigeration. In fact, since the rate of chemical reactions is directly related to temperature, their shelf life may have been slightly extended. You can move it to dry stores. While there are some circumstances where very fresh mayonnaise should be kept at room temperature, ...


7

Yes, hollandaise is a warm mayo. The melted butter should denature the egg yolks a little bit, so even if it's made with olive oil, I'd expect there to still be some heat involved to classify it as 'hollandaise' and not simply 'mayonnaise'. Aïoli that you see in restaurants is often just mayo with garlic in it, but the classic Spanish recipe is made with ...


7

Mayonnaise - unless made by a recipe that is explicitly designed to yield a shelf stable version (as many commercially made mayonnaises are) - is not a shelf stable food. That means the common standard of unrefrigerated storage time of 2 hours max, or 4 hours if immediately consumed, is to be applied. So spoilage after room temperature storage of 8 or even ...


6

Xanthan gum emulsifies by being a hydrocolloid, so agar and acacia have a chance of also working since they are also hydrocolloids. The amounts would have to be altered as agar sets much more solidly than xanthan gum, and gum acacia sets less solidly. Lecithin is a commonly used emulsifier in mayonnaise (probably even more so than xanthan gum). It's ...


6

Nope. The only way you can really preserve things at home for room temperature storage is by canning in a boiling water bath or pressure cooker, and the heat from that will break the emulsion of your mayonnaise, completely ruining it. On top of this, mayonnaise will also tend to break at room temperature, so it won't work even if you make it safe. ...


6

Kewpie mayo contains MSG. This boosts the umami flavor. Perhaps you can approximate Kewpie in your homemade by playing with the addition of MSG.


6

You are basically talking about a Hollandaise sauce, which is similar to mayonnaise in that it is an emulsion of egg yolk and fat. The main difference is that in mayonnaise the fat is oil, whereas in Hollandaise it is butter. The main flavours in mayonnaise come from an acid (lemon juice or vinegar) and mustard - Hollandaise likewise uses lemon juice, and ...


6

The sulfur content in the distilled white vinegar used in commercial mayo really emphasizes the egg flavor. If you're using a different vinegar, I think that you should switch to see if it does the trick. The cooked egg flavor you're looking for comes from pasteurizing the eggs for the mayo. If you've got an immersion circulator, you can do a relatively ...


6

The mayonnaise itself is only a stable emulsion in certain temperature ranges. If you are talking about standard mayonnaise (made with egg yolk), it will split when heated, and won't help your new sauce at all. If you are planning to use one of those vinegar-oil emulsions sold in supermarkets under the name mayonnaise, I cannot predict how they will handle....


6

Fatty acids are not the emulsifiers here. Long chain fatty acids are excellent for emulsification, if they are deprotonated. But then they would be called “fatty acid salts”, and their flavor would be soapy - bitter. If they're neutral fatty acids, they're not ionized enough to retain a sphere of water around the micelle, and block aggregation of the ...


5

Cook an egg, put it in the blender with some oil, lemon juice, mustard and salt. This allows you to create a mayonaise-like substance, but with less fat content so you'll have much less of a greasy texture. For something like a potato salad I'd add some heavy yogurt to this.


5

I'm going to step out on a limb based on experiences I've had. I suspect that adding garlic and or chopped clams after you have emulsified your other ingredients is simply adding moisture and making your mayo/aioli thinner. (Especially since you said that it doesn't break.) I would suggest putting your garlic or clams in at the beginning with your other ...


5

The mustard is used as a flavouring - either you like whatever flavour the alternative mustard yields, or you don't - and as an added emulsifier. The emulsifier effect can be achieved with pretty much any mustard, be it english, french, or in powder form (mind flavor interaction with vinegar in that case...). The mayonnaise might even work without any ...


5

The fizzing is a warning sign: There is unwanted life in your mayonnaise. The fizz indicates microbes - bacteria and/or yeasts - growing in your bottles. The fizz is likely CO2, a byproduct of their digestive activities. Any food with signs of unplanned and unknown fermentation processes is not safe and should be discarded. You don’t mention any “...


5

With the exception of the water and salt, any of those ingredients will burn if you heat them hot enough. If you're seeing it more with a particular brand, though, and if it's happening at temperatures below 200 degrees Celsius, it's probably the egg. Mass-produced commercial mayonnaise like Kraft has relatively little egg, while 'boutique' mayo (or homemade ...


4

You're going to need to add vinegar (or lemon juice, or something acidic). After making mayo with vinegar, just leave it out for a few hours before putting it in the fridge, so the acid has a chance to kill the bacteria in the egg. You can keep it for a week after that, 2 weeks is at your own risk though. Personally, I'd risk it - but I don't decide ...


4

Food quality isn't binary; it doesn't go from perfectly good to perfectly bad in an instant. Even if it did, the time it would take depends on the storage temperature. And for non-liquid foods, it's possible that only a part went bad (how well does it mix?). So, you don't get a precise date, but a rough interval at which time the decay starts to set in. As ...


4

Note that basic mayonnaise normally is made from egg yolks, oil, mustard, citron juice, salt and pepper. This is means that the flavors in mayonnaise are a bit sour. This is normally compensated with sugar in the recipe, but you are using a non-sugar recipe. I think the idea of adding mayonnaise for the texture is ok. However I experienced the effect of ...


4

Megha's answer covers contemporary usage among hobbyists. There is an alternative point of view: the standard classification schema for French sauces. It is still in use in posh restaurants today. This schema absolutely precludes that "an emulsion of egg yolk with seasonings might be called by any name" and gives a separate name for dozens of possible ...


4

The Organic way: You're saying that you've tried adding more raw eggs to your recipe, but do not provide any details, so I'm assuming you make mayonnaise with the entire egg (like my aunt does) whereas I only use the yolk of eggs of vegetable and maize-fed chickens and mine tastes much more "eggy" than my aunt's... So: Buy your own chickens and feed them ...


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