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56

It's possible to get specialized equipment for this: a plunger measuring cup. The base is adjusted to the level you need to measure, the sticky honey or syrup is poured in, and then the cup is upended and as the base is pushed in, it scrapes the sides as it travels. I'd only invest in this if you very frequently measure sticky ingredients -- it's not ...


51

As, since this answer other suggestions have abounded, let me clarify. These methods assume you want no wastage & also no cross-contamination of your source jar of the sticky component. They also require almost nothing in the way of 'extra equipment'. Depending on what the next steps to your recipe are, I can think of three alternatives. None are ...


49

Your concern is NOT getting the measuring item clean. Your concern is ensuring the right amount of ingredient goes where it is desired. If you have decent accuracy digital kitchen scales (relatively cheap usually but may depend on your location), you can measure by weight. If you need to determine the weight by measure of your sticky substance, start with ...


49

What I do, if the recipe calls for any sort of oil, measure that first, then the honey slides out pretty well.


36

It seems that B/E is a corruption of ¼ (as MaxW has suggested in a comment). A Google search for "B/E- inch slices" finds https://www.drperlmutter.com/recipe/zucchini-yogurt-gazpacho-saffron-marinated-chicken-breast/ (which I guess is what you are trying to follow), but it also finds the PDF file http://www.fasttracktohealth.net/members-only/...


33

Quite often, it's because a manufacturer prefers to decrease the size of a packet than to increase its price. Customers notice when the price goes up but don't tend to notice the product getting smaller. For example, jam in the UK used to be sold in jars containing one pound, which became the equivalent 454 grams with metrication. But, more recently, that'...


33

Obviously you can't "heap" a liquid. What helps is if you remember that in cooking measurements are not set in stone. The amount given in a recipe can basically always be tweaked to your liking - a tablespoon need not be the "perfect" amount, but should be a good starting point. E.g. the siracha: some like their dish hotter, some less so. In your case I'd ...


29

While 127 is a weird number, 227 isn't - it's the grams equivalent of half a pound. In most cases where something is a weird (nonround) size in metric measurements, it's 10 fluid ounces or a quarter of a pound or something else reasonable in imperial units. Why so many 454g packages instead of 500? So the same machine can be used to make 1 lb packages (just ...


28

Is it more accurate? ABSOLUTELY Does it mean that you can still follow a recipe by weight exactly and expect perfect results everytime? No You're right in that humidity will vary the weight, but if you're consistently working in the same area with a small change in humidity - its not something to worry about. You'll adjust your recipe once and then ...


25

Assuming you bought a rice cooker designed by a Japanese company (and apparently even other brands tend to meet that market's expectations), the measurement is 1-gou, slightly more than 180ml, which, by no coincidence, is also the typical measure of a wooden sake, cup, and is closely associated with a historical sake bottle size (approximately 1.8l) http://...


23

After searching different places, I could not find a clear answer. I therefor decided to measure it myselfe. I bought a bunch of normal sized lemons, and squeezed them. On average, the lemons I bought yelded 55ml, thats 3,67 tablespoons of juice per lemon.


23

Simplest solution: Buy a more sensitive scale. There's plenty around that can measure grams. If that's not an option, you can sort of just about get it quite, but not completely wrong by using measuring spoons: A full teaspoon with something in it is usually around 5 grams. A quarter teaspoon would be 1.25 grams, if you happen to have a 1/8th measuring ...


23

It is to show you the ratio of juice to water, but leave the quantity up to you. This way you can make different amounts: for example 1 unit lemon juice to 3 units water. You could sub in pints or liters or gallons or hogsheads or whatever was appropriate for the amount of lemonade you wanted to make, according to the ratio provided. The puzzler is how ...


21

Much more often, expert chefs will use an accurate digital scale, particularly for baking. Cups are OK for liquids, and most people use spoons for small measurments like salt or yeast, but scales are accurate for everything from flour, to honey, to water, to softened butter. Plus, since you can generally tare scales, you don't have to wash anything out but ...


20

Assuming you're talking about USA usage, you're correct, a "cup" is usually 6oz. In the USA, the standard size for a "cup" of coffee is 6oz, even though nobody drinks cups of coffee that small (12oz to 20oz is more common). For that matter, the size of a "cup" of tea can be 5oz or 6oz when the number of "cups" a teapot holds is listed; a "6 cup" teapot is ...


18

Looks like a misprint for Pound. The point of Pound Cake is that you use the same amount of each ingredient - for example, a pound.


16

It's not a perfect solution, but using two spoons and scraping one with the other you can get the majority of the syrup off the spoons relatively quickly.


15

According to Red Star, a very common yeast brand in the US: The strip contains three packets; each packet in the strip is considered one package. Each package contains 1/4 oz. or 2 1/4 teaspoons of yeast. This is approximately 7 grams, or 11 ml. This is representative of all of the US brands.


15

The math answer: 1/2 = 3/6 1/3 = 2/6 So (3/6) - (2/6) = 1/6 cups As 1 cup is 237 ml, 1/6 is about 40 ml. 40 ml is two tablespoons (15ml each) plus 2 teaspoons (5 ml each). To fill 1/3 to make 1/2 cup add 2 tblsp + 2 tsp. The lifehack answer: Dump the 1/3 of a cup into a 1/2 cup and fill it up.


14

Yes they do; mostly for baking and pastries where precision is more important. For other types of cooking, precision is not that important. Experience play a role when knowing the quantity needed for a recipe. Also, most of the time, we see chefs (on TV or in real cuisine) handling small containers of prepared ingredients, and those are measured when they ...


14

This question is actually answered in a comment to the recipe you linked: kimberly says: Sorry for silly question, but the ingredient list says ” ½ sleeve celery $0.65 “. do you mean 1/2 of a stalk or 1/2 of a bunch of celery? [...] Beth M says: Yes, I meant a half bunch. Sorry about the confusion! :) I used about 4 stalks or so. They ...


14

Because a fluid ounce and a dry measure ounce (both volume measurements) are about 20% different, though "dry measures" (other than the measuring scoops and spoons in a USA kitchen) have become far less common as most product is now marketed by weight, not volume. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dry_measure A US dry quart is 1101 cc, while a US liquid quart ...


14

Silicone spatulas are quite good at cleaning hard vessels well. Combine that with a small enough measurement - so don't measure 50 ml of honey in a 1000 ml cup, use as close to 50 ml as this gives you a better ratio of volume-to-wall-surface - then scrape with the silicone spatula, and it will be almost as clean as licked. For getting the cup clean ...


13

How about Ruhlman's book, Ratio: The Simple Codes Behind the Craft of Everyday Cooking? The entire work is dedicated to breaking cooking down into ratios, and it includes recipes. I hear the bread recipe is particularly good.


13

According to the Kitchen Companion, a terrific general handbook which I recommend, 1 lb (about 2 cups) of dried beans is roughly 6 to 7 cups cooked beans, and one 15oz can of cooked beans is roughly 1.75 cups drained, making it equivalent to 1/4 to 1/3 lbs ( or 1/2 to 3/4 cup) dried. Per my personal experience, dried beans increase in volume from 2.5X at ...


13

Better is a subjective term, however you can see what is done in practice as a guide to what people think is generally efficient as a balance of preparation speed, accuracy and cleanup. Many recipes use a combination of volume and weight. Volume for most liquid measurements like milk, water or stock is considered more efficient than weighing them because ...


12

Italians weigh it and it's really the only fail-safe way. Using a kitchen scale with a big bowl on top should work for just about any pasta shape. 40g for a small portion, 100g for a big plate full. Cooked volume will depend on the type of pasta, but with spaghetti for example about 55g of dry will produce about 1 cup of cooked spaghetti. This agrees ...


12

Changes in the weight of ingredients due to humidity are very small compared to changes due to how loose or tight your flour gets packed into the measuring cup. Weighing the ingredients eliminates one (major) source of measurement error. You'll still have to compensate for other things on your own.


12

Oh man. That's a lot of cilantro. Some people are more sensitive than others, but make sure you like it a lot before putting that much in a dish. In a perfect world we would all have ready access to scales and all recipes would list ingredients like these by weight instead of volume. That said, reality tends to lean more in favor of the volume-based ...


12

I think this is a typo. The original is probably 3 ст. л, which means 3 tablespoons (an abbreviation for столовые ложки). Note that, in Russian cursive handwriting, a т looks like a Latin small m, and can also, with the wrong amount of slant and writing speed, look like a Cyrillic small m. I don't know where cursive handwriting can have come into play in ...


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