23

America's Test Kitchen did a segment on digital kitchen scales. Their judging criteria were: Accuracy: Does the scale display the correct weight? Button usability: Are the buttons in an accessible location? Can they be pressed without too much force? Display visibility: Can you see the display when a large bowl is on the scale? Are the numbers large enough ...


16

According to the nutella nutritional fact label, 1 tbsp = 19g. There are 16 tbsp in a cup so 16 * 19g = 304g


13

Generally, I'd suggest trying to make sure the display and buttons are easily accessible, even if you've got something big on it. That often means something that looks more like the one on the left than the one on the right: If the buttons and display are on a single flat surface along with what you're weighing, that can work, just try to make sure it's ...


12

One thing that hasn't been mentioned so far but is listed as "feature" of the first scale you linked is auto-off. I expect that a manufacturer like Soehnle is able to implement this in a useful way, but better double check how it works and whether this is suitable with your work-flow. I've met scales with time-triggered auto-off that were extremely ...


9

Hello dennismv and welcome to Seasoned Advice! This page gives information and history on the faceted glass, so popular in Russia. From what I could glean from other sites your measurements are correct. For use in recipes you would fill to the top of the facets or, as you say, the natural edge. This would be 200 ml. **EDIT Update -- The recipe below, ...


8

Your scale is measuring weight, not volume. Some scales do have an option to "convert" to volume, but they have to do so based on density; they don't actually know what's on top of them. So unless yours is really fancy, and has a bunch of densities programmed into it, so that you can say "this is flour" and let it convert, it's probably just assuming ...


8

Every scale should indicate its accuracy in its manual. A good guess if you have no manual is that the accuracy is approximately half of the size of the smallest unit it reports (for example, my digital scale reports down to grams, so its accuracy is probably within about 1/2 gram). If the scale is analog, you can get an idea by the smallest interval on ...


7

(1) A packet of yeast is typically 7g exactly. So if you're buying yeast by the packet, use one packet. But assuming you will be measuring from bulk yeast, the correct measure by volume would be 2 1/4 tsp instead of 2 1/2 tsp. (2) The weight of salt relative to its volume varies considerably depending on what salt you are using - the best way to work ...


7

I actually measured and weighed a cup of Nutella and I got 290g. Of course we have to take into consideration my 1 cup measurement (I'm pretty sure they are not exactly the same) and my scale. But it just shows that the 300g mark is not far off.


7

In my experience the only characteristic I'd add to the considerations is: - Ability to switch between different measurement systems (U.S./Imperial vs. Metric)


6

appears to be a similar concept to what one cup is in United States. Sadly, this is not the case. While the US cup is an imprecise way to measure baking ingredients, the Russian glass is even worse. The cup in the United States is a standardized measurement of volume. When a US baker has to measure a "cup", she doesn't use a cup from the cupboard. She ...


6

Well as a chemist the densities of water and any watery liquid like milk will be very close to 1 gram per milliliter (g/ml) -- within a few percent. However corn oil would be off since it is about 0.90 g/ml. Lard seems to be about 0.87 g/ml. So be careful, but I'd guess that most ingredients in a recipe would work if within 10%.


6

On my Nutella jar it says that 2 tablespoons of the deliciousness is 37 grams. So, 37x8= 296 grams of Nutella is one cup.


6

Here's my trick for measuring sticky, dense things like Nutella: Take whatever liquid you're using and measure an amount, like 1 cup. add the Nutella to the liquid and the level will rise to the measurement you need. For example, if I need 1/2 cup of Nutella and there is milk in my recipe, I'll put 1 cup of milk on my measuring cup, add enough Nutella to ...


5

I estimated that 1 cup of nutella is around 294 grams: I bought a jar of 350 grams of nutella, used a marker to indicate the nutella level of the jar. Emptied it (I was gonna use it for cookies anyway adjusting the recipe to just one 1 jar). After cleaning the jar out. I put it on a scale and filled with water. In went 282 grams of water = 282 milliliter ...


4

Mine gets it right to the nearest gram. It's easy enough to test the accuracy of your scale using water. For tiny increments, you can use coins. A US quarter weighs 5.67 grams, a nickel weighs 5.0 grams, a dime weighs 2.268 grams. I'm pleased with mine. It doesn't do fractions of a gram, but when I weigh 2 quarters it comes up 11 grams occasionally bouncing ...


4

You'll need a sub-gram scale for that such as this one by Jennings: The bigger scales' are at best accurate to a gram or two (the expensive german one in our kitchen is good to 2 grams). That defeats the point of weighing coffee given that amounts effect on the result.


4

I was born and raised in (at that time) Soviet Russia. Though my answer to your question is 3 years overdue, we did measure flour and sugar in cups, and the rest of the ingredients in grams or ml, for dry and liquid respectively. And yes, 1 Russian cup of flour is close to 1 standard American cup, but not exactly. I found, when converting my mother's old ...


4

Some scales seem to try to make the display look more stable (or clandestinely compensate for a calibration drift problem?) than it is by not reacting to very small, slow weight changes until a threshold is reached - e.g., if you try to add baking powder by the gram you will get no change in display for the first few grams, then a sudden jump (or the small ...


3

If you have an RS232 scale you have a couple of very decent options for getting the data out of it. You could get an RS232 to USB adapter and write a script of some kind to request and pull the data - probably the easiest option - however it would not have network access, just access from the wired computer. If you genuinely want it to be on the LAN then I'd ...


3

What would a network-attached scale even do? You'd have to configure it to report to something, or have something else poll for it (and then you'd still have to configure it, either via DHCP, BOOTP or similar to set its IP address). It'd be a security nightmare, as it'd be like a network attached medical device (or old printer) that never gets updates to ...


2

I tend to use cheap digital ones and just replace them when they break ... if you are paranoid about accuracy, get two from different brands and occasionally compare. For testing, just find some unopened ingredients packaged in light, labelled bags and weigh them... one might be off but not all of them (unless they are all hygroscopic and you stored them in ...


2

I've been using a 15 Eur model for years now, and I am very happy with it. By the way, my brick and mortar store sells the same model for 30 Eur. I have a calibrating weight, and I can tell that the scale is still as accurate as ever. I only use one feature (tare), and all scales I have seen have it. The scale has a resolution of 1 g and can measure up to ...


2

If you want consistently very accurate results, you can get a model that lets you calibrate the scale using known weights. This is especially helpful when you replace the batteries. The MyWeigh i2600 has the calibration feature; the weights are an optional feature.


1

I'm wondering what considerations should inform my decision. The biggest consideration for me is to have a separate tare button. Models with a single button for tare vs. "off" require you to long-press the button to get either function, and that just annoys. I would take a flat one with a recessed button/display area. I.e., not one like the Soehnle 67080. ...


1

I have one that includes a digital watch. That means it runs out of battery everytime I need it for something important. Had I been aware of that, I would have chosen a model, that did not use power when not in use. So get one, where off means off.


1

Reply just received from pot's producer. In case someone would be interested about "the magic": The scale with 2,5l just applies to the empty jug without funnel and cartridge. So the funnel with cartridge inside displaces the water in the jug. I just tried this out with my own Initium jug. If you fill in 1000ml it´s the same amount of water, but it ...


1

Traditionally in my family 1 glass means 180 gr. If you see the note - full glass it's approx 200gr (may be a little less).


1

In my research I found my answer to my question. A 13 oz jar of Nutella is equivalent to 1.6 cups for persons that use volume measurements. I used 1 cup 6 oz. Hope this helps somebody:) Fredsmom


1

Nutella is a bit specialised for most online converters, but butter is virtually the same density, and a cup of that weighs 238g. I wouldn't think you'd go far wrong with that.


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