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97

It's essentially just water. You can directly see this in the full USDA nutrition facts (link is for "Chicken, broilers or fryers, breast, meat only, cooked, roasted"). Per 100g, there is 65.26g of water, 31.02g protein, 3.57g fat, accounting for 99.85g. The rest is probably just trace nutrients and rounding errors. You'll see the same kind of thing for ...


77

This is a great question, but not one that can be answered with "yes" or "no". In some areas, it is known that the professional grade tools and ingredients require much skill to use well and so the general public is better off using consumer grade tools. (Try tasking the average office drone to create a report with Word or QuarkXpress and you'll see what I ...


54

The bowl (and the salt/pepper) is contaminated if you touch it after touching raw chicken or any other unsafe food. In fact, this is precisely why cooks and TV chefs mix it up in a little bowl first. They don't want to contaminate the entire container or even a perfectly good salt/pepper shaker. They don't reuse the bowl afterward, they throw out any ...


49

My response to this kind of question is always just ask, and if you absolutely can't, err on the side of caution. I'm assuming here that you're talking about a pretty thorough heating and brushing. If you're leaving a bunch of meat stuff on the grill, that someone could conceivably taste, that's not good - you certainly shouldn't be risking food that ...


47

hobodave's answer is most of the way there but I think it understates the importance of protein toxins. With the vast majority of foodborne illnesses, the bacteria aren't particularly harmful at all; what you need to worry about is the protein toxins they produce. E.Coli - probably the most well-known form of food poisoning along with Salmonella - is ...


45

If you premix to make a rub, it's easier to apply spices evenly. Otherwise, you must individually apply a small amount (for example, 1/4 tsp) of several spices evenly. With a rub, you make the spice mixture with the desired proportions, and there is a larger aggregate amount to spread.


36

It's not just American supermarkets that rarely carry mutton, this situation is similar across the Anglosphere, and I suspect most Western countries too (or at least those without a strong mutton culture). The reason is largely economic. Mutton is expensive and not as tasty as lamb. First, the immediate reason is that nobody really eats mutton anymore. Yes, ...


34

Whether you are a skilled cook or not, the quality of the end result will be helped by better quality ingredients. Take insalata caprese as an example, this is a salad of tomatoes, mozzarella and basil finished with a bit of olive oil and seasoned with salt and maybe a bit of pepper. It takes almost no skill to prepare this salad, you simply slice the ...


33

Seems like the bamboo mat used for making sushi rolls would be a good choice for this. Line it with heavy plastic wrap or parchment paper, of course.


32

One important thing to know is that heat doesn't instantly kill bacteria. At least not at temperatures that leave edible material behind. Bacteria take both time and temperature to destroy. The higher the temperature, the less time required. Take Salmonella senftenberg for example, it takes 60 minutes at 140 F (60 C) to kill 99.9999% of the population. But ...


32

It's really a question of taste. It's not going to hurt you, but there will be some undesirable effects. For example, to cook turkey properly, it must come to an internal temp. of 180. If the meat is frozen, it is going to take a lot longer for the internal temperature to rise that high, so the outside of the bird will be somewhat overcooked (compared to ...


32

Searing on a grill to "seal in juices" has largely been disproven. Meat loses juice at roughly the same speed regardless of searing the meat first. Searing does produce the Maillard reaction and caramelization which enhances flavor; however, searing first doesn't produce better results. A test performed by Alton Brown in 2008 demonstrated that searing at ...


31

It's neither necessary nor a particularly good idea; it does little to remove bacteria from the surface of the meat (which you're about to cook, remember) and runs the risk of spraying/dripping bacteria all over the kitchen. The FSIS has an article on it here: Washing raw poultry, beef, pork, lamb, or veal before cooking it is not recommended. Bacteria ...


31

Apple juice is good with pork. The frozen cans of concentrate are cheap and perfect for this use. Apple juice lacks the dark notes of cola. To get those I propose you add hoisin sauce. It is very sweet, a great mix with pork (I have some boneless ribs soaking in some right now awaiting the grill) and will lend the apple juice more of a dark sweet tone. ...


30

It is perfectly safe to eat (when produced, transported, and so on under sanitary conditions, just like any other edible meat). In some cultures it is considered a delicacy; in others, it is not considered appropriate to eat, but those issues of cultural norms, not of safety. The news is because it is a violation of trust (truth in labeling) in a ...


30

Depends on the person but typically... no. I'm not sure how bad cross contamination is in terms of food safety, but grills are high heat, though you might not always heat the food through. Many observant vegetarians however would minimally prefer separate dedicated utensils and cooking surfaces not used for meat. I personally wouldn't eat it, as a ...


28

It won't do anything useful. Brining works on raw meat by denaturing some of the proteins inside the cells so they gel and hold tightly onto their water. It also gets tasty salt in. Cooked meat has already had its proteins denatured by heat. Brining will not cause the meat to hold on to any new water. Basically all it will do is wash away some of the ...


26

One technique, but not the only, is velveting. Here the meat is tenderized in an egg-white/cornstarch mixture for 20+ minutes, then cooked briefly (a minute) in oil or simmering water with a small amount of oil prior to using in stir fries. I've never velveted in straight oil but water/oil definitely gives the chicken that smoothness that Chinese ...


25

No, the mold on meat isn't especially bad. It won't eat your insides. But still, moldy meat is worse than moldy plants. Mold itself isn't a strong health concern. It can't cause an illness, and doesn't grow in the human stomach. There are some kinds which produce metabolic byproducts poisonous for humans, and this means that you shouldn't eat moldy food, ...


24

The USDA has this to say on it: Storing Leftovers One of the most common causes of foodborne illness is improper cooling of cooked foods. Because bacteria are everywhere, even after food is cooked to a safe internal temperature, they can be reintroduced to the food and then reproduce. For this reason leftovers must be put in shallow containers for quick ...


23

Beef (and Lamb): The surface of beef is often contaminated with pathogens such as e-coli. However, the meat is very dense and the bacteria cannot migrate from the surface into the flesh. Therefore, beef is safe to consume once the external temperature exceeds, 160 degrees F. The internal uncontaminated meat is safe to eat raw. Pork: Like beef the surface of ...


23

This seems to be one of those gag gift products you find on the web that has attracted attention for its absurdity... reading through the questions and reviews, it's difficult to tell which are jokes and which are genuine... regardless, it seems that the "Ham Dogger", a device for making hot dog-shaped hamburger "patties", may do what you're looking for. And,...


23

Well, many steak experts have held for years that bone-in steak just tastes better, something about that marrow being good. J. Kenji Lopez-Alt from Serious Eats tested that theory. He found that the steak bones were too impenetrable for the marrow to actually flavor grilling steak, but that the bones provided beneficial insulation: To test this, I ...


21

According to the University of Minnesota Extension (emphasis added): What causes the wild or gamey taste in venison? Venison refers to the meat of antlered animals such as deer, moose, elk and caribou. The 'wild' flavor of venison is directly related to what the animal eats. Corn fed deer will have a milder flavor than those that eat acorns or ...


21

In the UK there are two main cuts of bacon. There's "streaky bacon", which is cut from the pork belly. This is mostly what you get in the US. There's also "back bacon" which is cut from the pork loin. This is generally more popular and is very much leaner than streaky bacon. In the US you call it "Canadian bacon". You can also get "middle bacon" which ...


20

Pull them out on time. Cool them rapidly in an ice bath. The rapid cooling is for food safety reasons rather than any affect on the cooking. Reheat them for cooking however you were going to finish them originally. I wouldn't leave them cooking for 48 hours. I think you run the risk of affecting the texture of the meat negatively. If you're planning on ...


20

Canned foods are by their very nature cooked once they're in the can. That's how they keep so well. It is possible to grill canned meat if you dry it first, and it may benefit from a little browning for best flavour (assuming this wasn't done before canning).


19

There is a grain of truth in the claim that flash-freezing beef "seals in flavour". If meat (or anything else) is frozen slowly, large ice crystals form. These puncture the cells, resulting in a mushy texture when the food is thawed. But, because a lot of the cells have burst, all their contents can drain out, too, so you're going to lose flavour. However, ...


19

Yes, that'll contaminate your spices. You really don't want to touch anything after touching raw meat, unless it's something you're about to wash or cook. It's not too hard to avoid this though. You can keep a clean hand and a dirty hand - grab spices with the clean one, rub them in with the other. As Joe points out, this is also helpful if you end up ...


18

Trying to predict when a roast is done based on time is a very poor method. Many factors can change how long a particular roast takes to cook to your preference, including: Size and shape of the roast--generally the thickest dimension primarily affects how long it takes Initial temperature of the roast What temperature you cook it at The doneness you are ...


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