47

With absolutely no citation or evidence to back up my claim ;-) I'm going to say that the reasoning is two- if not three-fold…. or maybe more... It's cheaper. It adds bulk. It helps the meatball stay whole; a binder. Similar reasoning as breadcrumbs &/or egg, but see 3. The binder is needed because the EU allows the meat producer to add 10% water to the ...


11

Getting meatballs done is a matter of raising them to the correct internal temperature. 30 minutes seems like a long time even for large meatballs, but it depends on many factors. The best way is to pull the biggest one out and test it, first see if it's firm or squishy - firm means it's getting close to done. If it's firm stick an instant read thermometer ...


11

100% meat would be a burger patty... in German this would be Kartoffel-Hackfleisch Frikadellen or in short Kartoffridellen, while the potato starch cause them to be more crispy on the outside and more juicy on the inside, since the water is being bound by the starch. Generally it's a cheap filler which most people won't notice, unless reading the fine print. ...


9

Hello Cheryl and welcome to Seasoned Advice! Ground veal would be an excellent choice to substitute for ground pork. I think you will find that the flavor will be closer than turkey or chicken.


8

In the US, hamburgers are usually flat patties weighing somewhere between 3 and 8oz. and typically 100% ground beef. Many variations are possible, including mixing spices and other ingredients into the meat, but binders such as egg and breadcrumbs are not common. The defining characteristics of a proper hamburger for most Americans are the shape (flat), ...


6

It won't. In meatballs, pork and beef will behave pretty much the same, the flavor will just be of pork or of beef. The only real difference that you're likely to see (other than flavor) is if you are substituting ground pork for beef of a lower fat content. Ground pork in the US is not generally labeled for fat content, but tends to run about 20% fat. ...


6

While it is true that the mint flavor will fade with cooking, it is still there to some degree. I bet you would be able to identify the difference if you left it out. However, whenever you want to highlight a fresh herb, such a mint, it is good practice to chop some of that herb at the last possible moment before serving, and garnish your finished product. ...


5

According to Cook's Illustrated's article Tenderizing Meat with Baking Soda (possible paywall): Briefly soaking meat in a solution of baking soda and water raises the pH on the meat’s surface, making it more difficult for the proteins to bond excessively, which keeps the meat tender and moist when it’s cooked. This is almost certainly the effect of the ...


5

Ground lamb may also be a good substitute. It has a bit more fat than veal does, which would come closer to pork (though it may change the flavor a bit, adjust seasoning as needed). Alternatively, a fattier type of ground beef should work good (like ground beef chuck which is around 80% lean habitually). This will have less impact on the flavor than ground ...


5

You should be able to combine as many as you want. Pay attention to the fat content in each meat, as that can make a big difference in the yield as well as the texture. However, even if you make a fairly significant change (for example, from 20% fat to 10% fat), it still won't be wrong or inedible, just different. (Although, I wouldn't recommend trying ...


5

First, make sure any veggies added to the beef mixture are diced finely. Then instead of frying them bake them at 350 degrees for about 20 to 25 minutes. They are much firmer that way and you won't have to worry about them breaking apart while frying them.


5

The OP's answer is correct that this theoretically should have an effect, but I have my doubts about its practicality for a few reasons: The goal is supposedly to "reduce burning," which implies carbonization. Carbonization happens most rapidly at higher temperatures (over 400F or so) compared to the ideal temperatures for Maillard reactions. Thus, you ...


4

There's a few reasons for utilizing this method: You'll end up with a juicier meatball, as it is cooked in liquid. It'll be rounder and more plump because it was cooked in a liquid. You'll be 100% sure that it was cooked thoroughly without being burned. The reason for the pan browning is just a reverse sear - purely for color/crunchiness and perhaps some ...


4

Baking soda or baking powder? Powder will produce gas bubbles. Both baking soda (but not baking powder) and corn starch are prevalent in chinese cooking and its derivatives elsewhere in Asia. I am reasonably sure that they are used even in home cooking. Corn starch is used as a binder and texturing agent in minced or finely chopped meat. I have also seen ...


3

Ground chicken can be very soft and sticky, and difficult to form into balls without everything sticking together or going "squish". If you tried to make balls from completely cooked chicken, though, the balls wouldn't stay together. So, cooking part of the chicken gives the mixture some structure so they can be formed, and will stay together when you put ...


3

My Mother has always cooked her meatballs in water. Why? Well, first the meatballs had rice in the the meatball, parsley and depending on the cook prepared it, some other spices like minced garlic and all the indgredients listed above. She was making a soup with the liquid she was cooking the meatballs in and the meatballs were the size of tangerines, ...


3

If you add salt to your meat and leave for a few hours this will break down some proteins in the muscle (myosin), which cross-link / bind with each other. Hopefully you wouldn't need the egg to bind. I have done this with burgers and meatballs before, so no reason this wouldn't work OK for kofte


3

I theoretically can answer my own question, although I'm not 100% sure as to how it would affect the flavor. Yes, you can. When doing research, I saw that the maillard reaction preforms much more quickly at a higher PH. As per this article, making the reaction more basic quickens the browning process. As noted, increasing the speed at which it browns ...


3

My experience with meatballs has always involved multiple meats combined together while hamburgers contain a single meat. In fact, I'd go so far to say that MeatLoaf is a closer cousin to Meatballs barring size, shape and spice.


3

Whenever I have freezer burnt or really old frozen meat, my go-to solution is to use my slow cooker. Find a recipe that sounds appetizing to you and has a long cooking time (6-9+ hours on Low), and go for it. For example, here's a Meatball and Vegetable Soup recipe (which I'm not endorsing, it's purely as a "this is the style you're looking for").


2

Use a binder, like a couple of slices of white bread (with the crusts removed) torn into small pieces and then soaked in some buttermilk until it turns into a paste. In your case, you're also going to want to make sure that the onion pieces aren't too large as they'll cause trouble when trying to get the meat to stick together. Maybe consider substituting ...


2

Heston Blumenthal recommends generously salting the meat to be used for burgers as it helps it bind the meat together, the same principle would also apply to meatballs. http://www.gq-magazine.co.uk/entertainment/articles/2011-07/07/gq-food-barbecue-recipe-guide-barbeque-bbq-grill/the-burger-heston-blumenthal-fat-duck Take the minced meat, add a generous ...


2

No cheating necessary, and this always works in our kitchen: Mix the raw ground meat in your stand mixer with the paddle attachment for a couple of minutes (makes an emulsion). Then proceed as usual. If adding onions, grate them and set the juice aside, then make the meat balls. This should work even if your meat is extra-lean. Of course, it helps if ...


2

Three concepts apply here: 1) cooking the meatballs -- 20-30 minutes should be enough to properly cook the meatballs; 2) flavoring the sauce -- you can leave the meatballs in a gently simmering sauce for up to 90 minutes to flavor the sauce; 3) texture of the meatballs -- there is a split of preference between those who like to brown the meatballs in a ...


2

Bread crumbs do not help meatloaf hold together. It was started back in the depression when they wanted meat to stretch out, they would add the crumbs. The thing that hold meatloaf together is the eggs.


2

It doesn't matter in which modality (banking, simmering) you bring the meatballs up to temperature, only that you do. Normally, if you are cooking them in the oven first, it is for browning generate additional flavor. Otherwise, you could simply simmer them from the beginning, which is perfectly viable.


2

I've made meatballs from Beef, pork, beef/pork blend, chicken, all kinds of fish (from white fish to blue fish), self caught blue crab, even clams but those were more like fritters than meat balls to be honest, even out of chick peas (those are actually called falafel and not really a meat ball, but they are similar) Season appropriately for the meats you ...


2

The recipe that I traditionally used calls for cleaned then boiled lentils that were then allowed to cool and then transferred to the food processor and reduced to a smooth paste.


2

There really isn't a safety issue here as long as you brown the meat soon after taking it out of the fridge and immediately re-refrigerate it. Just don't leave it out of the refrigerator longer than necessary to do the browning. It wouldn't hurt to save the browned meat in a clean container, not the one that that held the raw meat.


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