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16

What you're seeing is called chocolate bloom. It doesn't happen because of tempering, it happens in spite of it (or sometimes due to improper tempering). Sugar bloom is pretty straightforward - it happens due to moisture exposure (e.g. condensation) causing dissolution and re-crystalizing of the sugar on top. You can easily check if you have sugar bloom by ...


13

It's not. The original consumers of chocolate, the Native Americans, had their chocolate in bitter teas and savory moles. They mainly were after its caffeine effects. We could speculate about the overuse of sweeteners in general, especially among peoples of European descent. Other ingredients like mint, cinnamon, and cardamon come to mind. In the European ...


12

Spanish hot chocolate and Italian cioccolata fiorentina both use cornstarch as a thickening agent. Both are used more for dipping or sipping (churros in the former case), however you could easily just use less cornstarch to make it more 'drinkable'. Try a teaspoon of cornstarch, mixed with a little cold water, added to the milk when you boil it. As Kate ...


11

If you can get instant espresso powder (most big grocery stores in the US have it) that's what you want to use. NO WATER, small amounts of water will ruin chocolate, cause it to seize. Just sprinkle some powder in while the chocolate is melting. It will blend right in. If you can't get espresso powder, you can use instant coffee, just be sure that it's a ...


9

I am sorry, but the accepted answer is incorrect in many details. When chocolate seizes, it is due to a small amount of moisture. Imagine a cup of sugar. It will pour freely. If you add a small amount of water, clumps of the sugar will stick together and stop flowing. Add enough water, and the combination of sugar and water dissolve together, and flow ...


8

I see enough here: Rheological measurements of chocolate quality: non-Newtonian liquid non-ideal plastic behavior time-dependent behavior Thixotropic/non-thixotropic transition To make me think that changing the direction in which you are stirring melted chocolate might easily cause changes in the properties of the melt that take a while to settle down. ...


7

How do you make chocolate thin enough to dip strawberries? Melt it. I'm not trying to be funny here -- you should have no problem dipping strawberries or pretty much anything else (that's solid) in melted chocolate. When candy makers coat things in chocolate, that's all they're using -- they don't add anything to make the chocolate thinner. If you're really ...


7

Heating it up in the microwave will temporarily make it runnier, but then it will go back to its original consistency. Here are some ways that may work for you: Add some neutral flavored oil: just a bit though or it will get greasy Add chocolate syrup: chocolate syrup is very runny will thin it out while still keeping the chocolate flavor. Hershey's is ...


7

It depends on what you're doing with the chocolate. If temperature isn't that critical and its going to be mixed into a cake or brownies or such, then do it in the microwave. Its simpler and as long as you don't rush it, its does a good job. Just go 10-20 seconds at a time, in bowl that doesn't hold heat well. If you need precise temperature controlled ...


6

From the recipe and your "fudge" description, I think the problem was that you didn't get enough air in the batter. Trying a different recipe is a good idea. The way to get more air into a flourless cake is through the eggs. Look for recipes which require you to beat the egg whites separately to soft peaks. Mix everything very carefully, in the correct ...


6

There are two things to keep in mind while melting chocolate: Keep a low uniform heat I start off the melting process with low to medium heat. Once the chocolate fully melts, I reduce the heat to low and keep gently stirring all the while. If you allow the chocolate to cool, it separates out into non-uniform areas of heat, and the cooler pockets start ...


6

It sounds like the "one correct direction" thing isn't real. However, it's definitely a good idea to stir consistently in one direction, to keep things flowing smoothly (laminar flow) rather than creating turbulence. It's possible that they picked one direction as the standard direction and told everyone to stir that way to make sure it was consistent. But ...


6

Hello @stir_choc and welcome to Seasoned Advice! You really gave us a tough question! I have to admit that I had never heard of this. However after much digging it appears that there is in fact a very scientific explanation for the reason behind this. When I first started researching this, I came up with many results for recipes that gave the instruction ...


6

In the time before electric mixing, chocolate, made by hand, sometimes required the effort of multiple people switching out as they tired, needed to work on some other task, or switched in and out cheaper laborers and experts during less or more critical stages of the process. Mixing chocolate in one direction is important not because there's "one true ...


6

I am scared that the chocolate will stick to the counter top (in plastic) or the sheet pan. Don't do it on the counter top. The best surface would be a silicone mat from a baking store - a smooth one, not the ones that seal an woven steel wool inside and so have a relief pattern. If you don't (yet) have that, plastic foil will do, you'll be able to peel it ...


6

When your chocolate goes grainy it's called "seizing". There are two main reasons for it to seize: Water: water getting into the bowl of the double boiler, either because it wasn't dry in the first place, or because of condensation. Overheating (burning). Unfortunately, once chocolate has seized there aren't reliable ways to re-temper that particular batch....


5

Chocolate is a sol, consisting of solid particles suspended in cocoa butter. It is something similar to a hard emulsion. And it can separate just the way a liquid emulsion does (think mayonnaise). This happens when you melt the cocoa butter completely, so the solid particles separate from the fat. If it happens to a chocolate bar, your chocolate looks grey. ...


5

To answer your last question: yes. Regarding the previous question, it's because the temperature at which the cocoa butter in the chocolate crystallizes affects the overall consistency of the chocolate. If you've ever eaten a chocolate bar that was left in a car on a hot day after it has cooled down again, and who hasn't, you'll know about this. Sometimes ...


5

I would agree with Kate to add higher-fat milk or cream to it and I would avoid putting in thickening agent if possible. One thing I have tried at a cafe before that instead of boiling the milk, they used the espresso machine steamer to mix milk and drinking chocolate powder together. The hot chocolate turned out really nice and thick. The other way of ...


5

Melting chocolate in a double boiler is the safest method for melting chocolate, and it's fairly easy. But it makes two pots dirty. I didn't had the problem of it being grainy. So I don't know what to say about that. Melting chocolate in the microwave oven is faster and requires less dishes, but you have the risk of burning. Therefore, lower the wattage and ...


5

If it has a shiny/reflective surface and doesn't melt or bloom (much) at room temperature or hand temperature, then it's already tempered. Virtually every packaged chocolate is already tempered. Untempered chocolate generally needs to be refrigerated for longer-term storage, so if a package doesn't specify refrigeration (and I've never seen one that does), ...


5

If really want to substitute for that coconut oil in this particular application, you want a pure, relatively flavorless, saturated fat. This will be one that is solid at room temperature. That means commercial shortening, such as the US brand Crisco. Update: cocoa butter itself, of course would be ideal, if you can get it. But, then you would want to ...


5

Will it end up being a (probably delicious) cake? Yes. Will it have the texture of a Victoria sponge? No. The melted chocolate will destroy some of the airiness of the sponge, making it more like a brownie. Instead, I would recommend substituting a few tablespoons of flour for unsweetened cocoa powder. That will give you a chocolate Victoria sponge.


4

Most chocolate you buy are already tempered(the ones with real cocao butter) but when you melt the chocolate so you can work with it, you must temper it again. I found this great article on allrecipe in regards to this. It gives step by step information about melting and tempering chocolate. http://allrecipes.com/howto/tempering-chocolate/


4

After experimentation, here is what we came up with: 1 tsp. of milk (I know you said no milk, but you need the fat in it to keep the Nutella from seizing) 1 TBSP. Nutella Instructions: Heat the tsp. of milk a couple of seconds in a bowl in the microwave - just a couple seconds!! Take a little chunk from the TBSP. of Nutella and stir it into the milk until ...


4

What you're missing is solids. 17g of cream (especially when you consider the high percentage of fat in cream in relation to solids) is not going to be enough against 60g of cocoa butter. Where are you from? In the US, milk solids (in the form of dried milk powder) are cheap compared to cocoa butter. Many high quality white chocolate brands do not contain ...


4

Have you checked your food coloring to make sure it isn't water-based? The addition of any water into chocolate will cause it to seize. You might be better off looking for a powder like this one: https://www.ckproducts.com/categories/276/Powder-Color-Cake-n-Candy Because it's a powder, it won't cause any harmful side effects to your chocolate. They sell it ...


4

As other answers have said, the result will NOT be (3). The chocolate may melt somewhat during baking, but it will solidify again as it cools. How much it sinks will depend on the thickness of the cake batter -- in some cases it may end up on the bottom, and in other cases it may not sink very much. To achieve your desired result (a "semi-liquid state"), ...


4

The cocoa butter in your chocolate melts fully at 43 degrees Celsius (110 F). But it stays liquid until at least 30 degrees C (85 F). The most heat sensitive proteins in an egg white coagulate at around 65 degrees C (145 F), most proteins stay stable until 85 degrees C (185 F). As you shouldn't overheat your chocolate anyway, you have a certain ...


4

Chocolate will stay fresh for weeks or even months if stored correctly. And yes, the spheres will stay as shiny and beautiful as you made them if you store them correctly: in a cool, dark place away from sunlight but not necessarily in the fridge - taking them out will lead to condensation on the surface at rather constant temperature and dry. So in ...


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