32

Almost exactly what you describe can be done, it’s shown in this video. The sugar isn’t hot blown, it’s isomalt, a lower-calorie sugar substitute used in lower calorie candies and by foodies because it is formable into interesting shapes, like your sphere. It's a sugar alcohol, derived from sugar, and is considered "natural" (see What does "natural&...


13

I have seen smoke presented under glass domes. Clearly the smoke wasn't put in there while making the glass. source: http://www.weekendnotes.com/onyx-dessert-lounge/ Probably the steps are: Make a bunch of spheres or near-spheres (with openings at the bottom) out of sugar and let them cool plate the rest of the dish - some sort of soft stuff to support ...


5

Making the spheres is doable, and getting smoke in is also do-able. However the smoke won't last very long. Smoke is particles suspended in the air, these particles would deposit onto the inside of the shell. You would want to make the spheres ahead of time, leaving a hole in them, then put some smoke into them just before serving. You may want to ...


5

I think you heated the sugar too quickly. Try again with a slower increase in temperature and you should have better results.


4

You should pour a little heap of sugar on top of the dessert, then swirl the dish around so that the surface is evenly covered with sugar. anything that's left over, dump on to the next one (or into an 'extra sugar' dish). This is important - there shouldn't be any loose sugar on top. Now use the torch as long as you need to, although in my experience ...


4

Unlined copper is sometimes used for serious sugar work, but it is very expensive and requires maintenance. For general home use where you want to get more than one use from the pan, a good multi-ply stainless pan is probably the best choice in terms of utility and easy of maintenance. You do not want ceramic coatings which can craze at high temperatures, ...


4

It sounds like your syrups are crystallizing on you. For a smooth glaze or caramel, you want tiny little sugar crystals. When you heat your sugar and water mixture, after a certain temperature the water becomes super-saturated with the sugar. After this super-saturation point, things get dicey. If the solution is disturbed--say by stirring, or an ...


4

I'm sorry, but what you are asking for is not possible. Caramel is a hard substance (I mean pure caramel here, not the stuff which has added dairy or acid and never hardens). You cannot even keep it melted the way you can do with water, because its decomposition temperature is lower than its melting temperature - at temperatures at which it is liquid, it is ...


4

For sabayon, you have to cook the eggs to hold the foam. Normally, you first mix air into the (cold) sugar and yolk, then heat on a water bath. This looks like an alternative method for heating the yolks, similar to the Italian method for meringue. I haven't used it, so cannot tell you how much it differs. If it behaves like Italian meringue, it will ...


4

You can caramelize the sugar without melting it. Perhaps that will give you the results you are after. http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2016/05/dry-toasted-sugar-granulated-caramel-recipe.html


3

Well, I'd say it has mostly to do with texture, but also with taste. To my knowledge there are three basic methods to making caramel: dry: without anything but sugar. In my opinion the most difficult method, as it tends to burn easily. wet: with water added to make sugar syrup, which is then turned into caramel. The water evaporates during the process. ...


3

There is the same concept for ice balls with smoke inside in this drink recipe: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ur08cq2qHV0 Maybe it can give some useful tips.


3

Presumably you'd blow sugar like you'd blow glass - with a blowpipe (likely not as long as needed for glass, since temperatures are a lot lower), from a molten vat at the correct temperature, and without sucking back. That should be feasible, but somewhat challenging. Smoke in the middle would be ephemeral (sure, you could presumably work out blowing it in ...


3

Walk away. No, really - it works. Once you add the water to the sugar, it will likely harden and clump up (I don't know how to stop that happening). But once it does, you can just walk away, and leave it to sit till it cools down. A lot of the sugar will just dissolve on its own, given time and enough water to dissolve into. Some mixing (occasional ...


2

A fascinating topic for all those interested in sugar-work! Though it looks like OP has abandoned the question, I'm still interested. :) Specifically, refinements to your question might include: Why a temperature of 126C? Aside: at that point you're more like at hard-ball stage (you say soft-ball). Are you working with it after, expecting its properties to ...


1

Without making it I wouldn't know for sure but I would guess there is just to much water in it. In the first recipe there is 4 tbs water=57g plus another 7 tbs liquid sugars=147g (aprox) and 440 dry ingredient. In the second one there is 110ml=110g water 170g liquid sugars and 225 g dry. Both honey and liquid glucose are about 15-20% water so in the first ...


1

Use two pots. As long as you haven’t caramelised the sugar, just turn down the heat on one and use the other saucepan to finish the batch you are working on.


1

Can't say I've ever tried method 2 but if it worked for you then I may actually give it a go as it sounds nice. As far as method one goes I feel like you've mixed the steps up a little. When I make brownies I melt the chocolate and butter together over a Bain Marie, I then remove from the heat once melted. Whisk the eggs and sugar together till fluffy (...


1

I have never heard of melting sugar for brownies, and it seems like a rather extremely fussy step for something as simple as brownies (but that's just me, if it works for you, Hey - it's your kitchen!) The problem of the layer of oil on the top of the brownies could likely be solved with the addition of a couple of egg yolks for their emulsifying ability. ...


1

There is no water left to evaporate at 126°C, it is all but gone already. Sugar does not melt like many other materials, is is breaking down with heat over 110°C ish, and turning into a liquid substance. Continued heating will result in a black mess. You can keep it liquid and at a particular point (e.g. soft ball) by very careful heat regulation. ...


1

Brands of tahini can vary; you might try adding a bit of additional oil (sesame oil would be a natural choice). The ambient humidity where you made this may also have contributed. If you're working in a dry area or kitchen, you may need to add another ounce or so of water to compensate. Lastly, you might also (gently) try heating the tahini and proofing ...


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